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In coming from higher level languages, I'm trying to rebase myself by learning c. I'm trying to understand pointers and memory allocation (something I've never had to think about before).

Code I'm trying

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{

    int array[] = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52 };

    printf("\nShuffling...\n\n");
    shuffle(array, sizeof(array)/sizeof(int));

    int i;
    for(i = 0; i < sizeof(array)/sizeof(int); i++)
    {
        printf("%d\n", array[i]);
    }

}

int shuffle(int *shuffle_array, int length)
{
    int i, j, newArray[length];
    for(i = 0, j = length; i < length; j--, i++)
    {
        newArray[i] = shuffle_array[j];
    }

    shuffle_array = newArray;
}

First, this doesn't work and I'm trying to figure out why the array isn't reversed on printing.

Second, comparing the concept of in-place editing vs returning a new item within c using malloc() and free().

share|improve this question
    
1st: newArray is allocated on the stack and will be freed after leaving shuffle -> shuffle_array will point to garbage. 2nd you are handing over a pointer and not a reference to a pointer (or a pointer to a pointer), hence your result will not be given back to the main -> no changes after shuffle. –  Till Jan 21 '12 at 23:15
    
cool, but then why does it print out in the original order properly then? if it points to garbage? –  jondavidjohn Jan 21 '12 at 23:17
1  
Since you use C99 (else you wouldn't be allowed to declare a variable in the heart of a function) you should also declare your for loop counters like that: for (int i = 0, j = length;...). Also, shuffle doesn't return anything although you declared it as returning an int. –  Gandaro Jan 21 '12 at 23:23
    
I'm just using gcc on OSX, so should I be declaring variables before anything else? –  jondavidjohn Jan 21 '12 at 23:32
    
The compiler doesn't matter. And no, you don't have to declare all variables at the head of the function, since you use variable length arrays (and they are only available in ANSI C99). You would have to use {cm}alloc() to have arrays of a variable length in C < 99 and thats even better, since you can't detect if you ran out of memory with C99 variable-length arrays. –  Gandaro Jan 21 '12 at 23:40

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When your function exits then your locally defined array drops out of scope and hence no longer exists.

You ought to memcpy back over the shuffle_array ...

memcpy( shuffle_array, newArray, length * sizeof( int ) );

Furthermore you are also starting your read off the end of shuffle_array. The last element in the array is "length -1".

Edit: Reading off the end of the array won't necessarily cause a problem. Its just that what you are doing is undefined behaviour.

The reason you see the same data come back out as you put in is because you don't actually change the data at all.

TBH for reversing an array a much better algorithm is to start at both ends and swap the data over. You could do that as follows:

for(i = 0, j = (length - 1); i < j; j--, i++)
{
    int temp = shuffle_array[i];
    shuffle_array[i] = shuffleArray[j];
    shuffle_array[j] = temp;
}

This way you totally avoid the need for a seperate array and that final copyback. You also save a load of stack memory. Score all round in my opinion.

share|improve this answer
    
Sounds reasonable, could you provide an example? –  jondavidjohn Jan 21 '12 at 23:15
    
and if that is the case, why is it printing it in the original order and not giving me a scope error? –  jondavidjohn Jan 21 '12 at 23:16
    
@jondavidjohn You're not doing anything illegal with the language, it's just that you're not doing what you think you're doing. –  Seth Carnegie Jan 21 '12 at 23:18
    
This looks a lot like a Java example I saw earlier today. –  octopusgrabbus Jan 21 '12 at 23:19
    
That's because you change the local variable shuffle_array of shuffle, not the array array of main. –  asaelr Jan 21 '12 at 23:19

Inside shuffle, you are creating an array called newArray on the stack (which means it will be deallocated when the function ends).

You are then putting each item from shuffle_array into newArray backwards.

Then you are making the pointer shuffle_array, a local variable (which means changes to it are not reflected outside the function), point to the first element of newArray. This doesn't change anything outside shuffle because shuffle_array is a local variable.

After the function returns, nothing has happened to anything outside the function. This is because you are just modifying the local data withing shuffle.

To shuffle the array (or reverse it, or do anything to it) you have to modify it directly instead of modifying a copy. So it should be

int tmp = shuffle_array[i];
shuffle_array[i] = shuffle_array[j];
shuffle_array[j] = tmp;

So that you swap the two values of the array elements you're on. Even though shuffle_array is a temporary variable, it points to the block of memory in main, so that modifying that memory is visible even after the function returns.

You can visualise it like this:

in main:

array  - - - - 
               \
                \
                 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ...,  52 };

when shuffle is called:

array  - - - - 
               \
                \
                 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ...,  52
                /
               /
              /
shuffle_array

newArray - - -
              \
               52, ..., 5, 4, 3, 2, 1

Then when you do

shuffle_array = newArray;

It looks like

array  - - - - 
               \
                \
                 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ...,  52



shuffle_array -
               \
newArray - - -  |
              \ /
               52, ..., 5, 4, 3, 2, 1

Then shuffle returns, and everything goes back to just

array  - - - - 
               \
                \
                 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ...,  52
share|improve this answer
    
great info, really appreciate it, learned a lot. –  jondavidjohn Jan 21 '12 at 23:30
    
+1 for the diagram :) –  asaelr Jan 21 '12 at 23:30

newArray is allocated on the stack and will be freed after leaving shuffle -> shuffle_array will point to garbage.

You are handing over a pointer and not a reference to a pointer (or a pointer to a pointer), hence your result will not be given back to the main -> no changes after shuffle.

How about this solution:

//note, the returned array needs to be freed using free();
int *newShuffledArray(int *shuffle_array, int length)
{
    int i, j;
    int *newArray = malloc(length * sizeof(int));
    for(i = 0, j = length-1; i < length-1; j--, i++)
    {
        newArray[i] = shuffle_array[j];
    }
    return newArray;
}
share|improve this answer
    
While I don't like the idea of managing memory if I can avoid it, I appreciate the alternate approach, useful info, learned a lot thanks! –  jondavidjohn Jan 21 '12 at 23:31
    
@jondavidjohn that is totally correct and the right idea of approaching the issue. I just wanted to point this alternative out for making sure you see its mechanics. The best solutions for your particular issue were given by Seth and Goz. –  Till Jan 21 '12 at 23:34
    
I do really appreciate it, dealing with raw memory and pointers is getting me turned around sometimes, but in a good way! –  jondavidjohn Jan 21 '12 at 23:37

FWIW, this will be much more efficient (I prefer code solutions).

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void shuffle(int *shuffle_array, int length)
{
        int i, j, tmp;
        for (i = 0, j = length - 1; i < j; ++i, --j) {
                tmp = shuffle_array[i];
                shuffle_array[i] = shuffle_array[j];
                shuffle_array[j] = tmp;
        }
}

int main(void)
{
        int i, array[] = {
                1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
                11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
                21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30,
                31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40,
                41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50,
                51, 52
        }, length = sizeof(array) / sizeof(int);
        shuffle(array, length);
        for (i = 0; i < length; ++i) {
                printf("%d\n", array[i]);
        }
        return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

As other have mentioned, the problem with your program was that you assigned your result to a local variable.

share|improve this answer

You don't change anything at all. You only set a local variable, so, what did you expect? ;)

#include <stdio.h>

void foo(int* a) {
    ++a;
}

int main(void) {
    int array[3] = {1,2,3};
    foo(array);
    for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
        printf("%d\n", array[i]); // results in 1\n2\n3\n, not 2\n3\nSegmentation fault\n
}
share|improve this answer
    
I find it interesting how my (correct) answer gets downvoted while a wrong answer is being accepted by the interrogator and being upvoted 4 times. –  Gandaro Jan 22 '12 at 13:13
    
You're not alone. I think down votes should print who down voted. I saw this question -- at least I think I saw it -- earlier in the day as Java code with the same question, but I cannot remember if it was the same poster. You probably got down voted because yours and my answers could be construed as comments. –  octopusgrabbus Jan 22 '12 at 18:10

1) You are assigning from an array on the stack. That data won't be there when the function returns.

2) I am curious as to why

shuffle_array = newArray

is used. It almost seems you are thinking there are copy constructor associated with arrays. This is not a criticsm, but is the result of my own curiosity. However, that assignment won't work, because you are assigning the address of an array on the stack to the array pointer that was passed into the function.

3) You would need to assign the local arrays' values back to the array passed in using a for loop or a memcpy.

share|improve this answer
3  
Nobody owes you a comment for downvoting. That isn't how the system is designed or intended to work. –  meagar Jan 22 '12 at 19:23
    
Your first paragraph (about the "array pointer values") is very unclear. I'm not sure what's your point there. It's also not clear what the "You cannot do this in C" refers to, the preceding paragraph or the following code segment. The quoted code does not assign element 0. Also, you can't assign arrays in C++. –  sth Jan 22 '12 at 20:25
    
It's not assigning to the first element of the array, but the pointer stored in the shuffle_array variable is replaced by a pointer to the array stored in newArray. –  sth Jan 23 '12 at 20:35
    
Thanks. I fixed it. –  octopusgrabbus Jan 24 '12 at 0:13

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