Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm interested how could I create a table like layout working only with div elements. I read a lot about "display" and "float" style attributes and I think this code should layout content as I want, but I see a table with the second row moved to one position below.

I expect to see:

left1 right1
left2 right2

but I see

left1 
left2 right1
      right2

Here my CSS

.big {
    display: inline-block;
}

.small {
    display: block;
}

.left {
    display: inline;
}

.right {
    display: inline;
    float: right;
}

And here my html file:

<div class="big">
<div class="small">
    <div class="left">left1</div>
    <div class="right">right1</div>
</div>
<div class="small">
    <div class="left">left2</div>
    <div class="right">right2</div>
</div>

I managed to create the table (add rule "width: 100px" to the ".small" selector) but I don't want to specify width of my DIV elements, because they could have different width.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
I believe left and right css classes must have display:float;. –  Web User Jan 21 '12 at 23:44
    
you are missing a </ div> tag at the end of the html, this a typo? also why? Tables are ok to use for displaying tabular data, just not for layout. –  Stuart Jan 21 '12 at 23:51
    
Missing </div> it's a typo. I'm learning CSS so I've created a task to create table by div element and trying to solve it –  AVokin Jan 22 '12 at 8:18
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If it's a true table layout, it's appropriate to use an html table. If it is not a true table layout, here's what you need in your CSS if you were to keep the HTML unchanged:

.small {float:left; clear: both;}
.left {float:left: clear: both;}
.right {float:left;}

"clear: both" is sort of like a carriage return (ding! for all you with memory of typewriters) "float:left" puts stuff next to each other horizontally instead of the natural vertical stacking of box elements (like divs).

For my own table-ish CSS layouts, I use only two classes, "row" and "column", as follows:

/* Standard CSS for div tables.  By Tom Haws
 * Overview:
 * 1. a row is a box element that wants all its children to be
 *    arranged in a (horizontal) row
 *    and is itself a new line rather than a continuation of a line.
 * 2. a column is a box element that wants all its children to be
 *    arranged in a (vertical) column
 *    and is itself a continuation of a line unless it is 
 *    the first column in a row.
 * 
 * */
/* Any child of a row AND any column class that is anything but first-child 
 * represents another column continuing the same row 
 * */
.row>*, .column
{
    float: left;
}
/* Every first child of a row and every column that is a first child of any parent 
 * represents a new row (first column) 
 * */
.row>*:first-child, .column:first-child 
{
    clear: both; 
    float: left;
}
/* All rows and all children of a column are a new line.
 * */
.row, .column>*
{
    clear: both;
    float: left;

}

Here's how I'd do your little example:

<div class="row">
    <div>left1</div>
    <div>right1</div>
</div>
<div class="row">
    <div>left2</div>
    <div>right2</div>
</div>

Feel free to ask any follow-ups about the nuances of the CSS markup and what it's doing.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Something like this will do. http://jsfiddle.net/V4GeD/

Note that the float:right will completely float the element to the right. You can also use float left with some margins.

I removed one <div class="small"> from your html, I didn't see any reason to keep it :-).

share|improve this answer
add comment

I found that removing the float left from the .small makes this more cross browser compatible.

    .small {clear: both;}
    .left {float:left: clear: both;}
    .right {float:left;}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.