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Delphi - NOVICE programmer - (meaning don't expect advanced concepts to be already known )

I am working on an application, part of which is a scheduling function. I look at a group of appointments. These appointments fall on a specific date. I need to create a consolidated view of all the appointments on each date. By this, I mean that I create a "grouping" of data about Jan 17th, this is going to be how many appointments are on that date, when they start, when they stop, etc. This may be an array, a Record, a class, don't know at this point. I may have one for the 17th, then the next one is for the 22nd, then the next is for the 24, and then I may have one every day for the next 35 days... I will have either 0 or 1 structures/containers per day, and I can see having 3 to 5 months months of these...Which ones exist and which ones don't exist will be very fluid. This structure is a consolidated view, meaning that I get some of the information from one appointment, and then some of the information from the next appointment, so as I am reading each appointment, I need to be able to find this structure quickly.

I need these structure to be memory based, so they are fast. They MAY be of different sizes (depending on the number of appointments on that day.

REQUIREMENTS So, I need to be able to create these structures on the fly. (for example, I have just read an appointment for Jan 22, and need to update the structure, but it doesn't exists yet, so I need to make it on the fly).

I need to be able to find them them quickly. (Hash on TDate maybe).

Each one of the structures will hold multiple data types (boolean, TDateTime, TStringlist, etc).

I have Delphi 2010 if that helps...

What structure am I looking for? Easy, fast, already included with D2010 (or free) are all important.

Thanks

GS

UPDATED INFO:

So it appears the TDictionary or TObjectDictionary is the way to go... I have decided (I think...) to use a record to hold my base information, and then store those records in either TDictionary or TObjectDictionary. I am running into a challenge in both of them. In TDictionary, I cannot figure out how to free the records when I am done with them (since they are pointers), and with TObjectDictionary, I cannot create it with a record type... Any help appreciated. Code samples are...

// Create the base record definition that will be put in the TObjectDictionary/TDictionary    

type
     TSummaryAppt = record
       Date : TDate;
       SA_ID : Integer;
       BusyFlag : Array[1..36] of Boolean; // 15 minute periods...
       PCTFree: Double;
       LargestFreeMinutes : integer;
   end;

If I go TObjectDictionary, this will not work...

var
  Dic : TObjectDictionary<Integer,TSummaryAppt>;

begin
  Dic := TObjectDictionary<Integer,TSummaryAppt>.Create([doOwnsKeys, doOwnsValues]);

The Create line fails on execution (compiles fine) with Invalid Class Typecast.

TDictionary appears to be a little friendlier, but I have to deallocate my memory....

var
  Dic : TDictionary<Integer,TSummaryAppt>;
  rec : ^TSummaryAppt;
  p : TSummaryAppt;
  i : Integer;

begin
  Dic := TDictionary<Integer,TSummaryAppt>.Create;

 // Now add some records.  THese have to be created dynamically
// because I dont know at compile time how many there are.

new(rec);
rec.Date := now;
rec.SA_ID := 3;
Dic.Add(1, rec^);

 new(rec);
rec^.Date := now;
rec^.SA_ID := 5;
Dic.Add(2, rec^);

new(rec);
rec^.Date := now;
rec^.SA_ID := 7;
Dic.Add(3, rec^);

// Test ...
  for p in Dic.Values  do begin
    ShowMessage(IntToStr(p.SA_ID));
  end;

// Now free everything.  HERE IS WHERE I AM HAVING PROBLEMS...
// What should I be doing?

 for p in Dic.values  do
    p.dispose;

  Dic.Values.Free;
  Dic.Keys.Free;
  Dic.Free;

end;

Any and all help appreciated. What should I be doing different? Thanks so much! GS

share|improve this question
1  
Have you looked at TClientDataSet? It's pretty much an in-memory database (that can have file-backed storage if you want), supports basically any datatype you might want, supports indexes, and if the amount of data you're keeping is reasonable in size is suitably fast. –  Ken White Jan 22 '12 at 2:54
1  
Your edit to the question is entirely inappropriate. That should be a new question. That said I can tell you that you should not be using New to allocate records. When you do Add on your dictionary a copy of the record is made. So you can use the a local variable of the record type and call Add passing that local. Anyway, please revert your edit here and ask a new question if you want specific help on dictionary use. –  David Heffernan Jan 22 '12 at 16:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Regarding your update to the question (which really needs to be a new question), here's what you need to do.

First of all, since both your key and value for the dictionary are value types you need to use TDictionary<K,V>. When you add items to the dictionary, a copy is made of both key and value so this means you need not do any dynamic allocation.

Your code should look like this:

type
  TSummaryAppt = record
    Date: TDate;
    SA_ID: Integer;
    BusyFlag: Array[1..36] of Boolean; // 15 minute periods...
    PCTFree: Double;
    LargestFreeMinutes: Integer;
  end;

....

var
  Dic: TDictionary<Integer, TSummaryAppt>;
  rec: TSummaryAppt;

....

// create the dictionary
Dict := TDictionary<Integer, TSummaryAppt>.Create;

....

// initialise rec, in your code you would put real values in
FillChar(rec, SizeOf(rec), 0);

rec.Date := now;
rec.SA_ID := 3;
Dict.Add(1, rec);

rec.Date := now;
rec.SA_ID := 5;
Dict.Add(2, rec);

//etc.

When you have finished with the dictionary all you need to do is free it. The dictionary owns all the contents and will clean up.

Dict.Free;

You may well prefer to wrap up the functionality of the dictionary and expose it through a higher-level interface. So you may have an Add method that received as parameters all the fields of the value to be added. And you may want an update method that received just the mutable fields.

share|improve this answer
    
If filling in the values (rec.date:=..., rec.SA_ID :=, etc...) why do I need to use FillChar in this example? –  user1009073 Jan 22 '12 at 18:40
    
You don't need to use FillChar if you fill in all the fields. I only did that because local variables are not initialised. You would fill in all the fields (or better, call a record constructor). –  David Heffernan Jan 22 '12 at 19:07
    
I am embarrassed that this answer is accepted. The specific part of the now sprawling question that this answer addresses is a very small part of it. The question should have been split into two and my answer would have been reasonable for the follow-up question. –  David Heffernan Jan 22 '12 at 19:09

Do you know the generic TDictionary collection?

class TAppointmentCalendar = TDictionary<TDate, TAppointments>
end;

TAppointments also can be a generic class, based on Generics.Collections.TObjectList:

class TAppointments = TObjectList<TAppointment>
end;

These classes can be extended as needed, for example to add properties or data aggregation methods.

Then instantiate a Calendar

Cal := TAppointmentCalendar.Create;

Cal.Add(MyDate, AppointmentsForThisDay);

or retrieve Appointments

var
  Appointments: TAppointments 
begin
  Cal.TryGetValue(ADate, Appointments); 
...

TDictionary performs hash based Key lookups.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for this suggestion. But most of the time if you're planning to store objects in the dictionary it is better to use TObjectDictionary because it can automatically free owned objects. –  Linas Jan 22 '12 at 10:21
1  
But such T*Dictionary does not handle storage directly... not sure it is a good idea for the OP. Serializing by hand is not so easy. –  Arnaud Bouchez Jan 22 '12 at 11:35
    
Arnaud not sure either, the best data storage solution, and mapping to data structures, very much depends on the general application design. –  mjn Jan 22 '12 at 11:46
    
@mjn You are right. In fact, the storage will indeed determine the application design. So it is worth talking about this point in the answer. Another issue I see with TDictionary is that there is only one key field available. For internal structures, this is fine, but for storing data, this is quite a limitation: what if the OP wants to search not only by starting date, but by stop date, or from the people involved? You'll need a more complete indexing feature that TDictionary. –  Arnaud Bouchez Jan 22 '12 at 16:01
    
Note that this is just for specific processing. I DO have a permanent data store (ABS Database by Component Ace. - Supports both SQL and TTable implementations.) –  user1009073 Jan 22 '12 at 18:26

First of all, as a novice in data structures, it is worth buying and reading this great book: The Tomes of Delphi: Algorithms and Data Structures - By Julian Bucknall.

Here are some potential layout to implement your application.

A. NoSQL database. For instance, take a look at our BigTable Open Source components.

The root component TSynBigTableis available to records within a file-based database. It is light, and very optimized for speed.

Two of their children do handle fields within records. The field layout can change on the fly. See TSynBigTableRecord and TSynBigTableMetaData.

B. Use a regular SQL database, either like TClientDataSet or direct via SQL (you'll find some Open Source components on a static SQLite3 engine (static, i.e. with no external dll needed).

Using SQLite3 as application data, is a very good idea. It is the main purpose of this library - it is used by a lot of programs, like FireFox or Chrome, or even in most Cell phones OS.

In order to make queries fast, you'll have to create indexes on some columns (e.g. date field), and therefore query results will be immediate.

I do not recommend "to be able to create these structures on the fly". It is not a good programming practice IMHO - or it will become very complex: it would need to store the field layout within the records, so it is not a good path for a novice Delphi programmer.

You should better make your data structures open enough to handle any kind of data. With SQLite3 you can serialize your data as BLOB or text (e.g. with JSON). This is e.g. what we allow in our Open Source mORMot ORM - it is client-server, but can be used stand alone. I'd recommend taking a look at our framework documentation, especially the SAD document which tries to present some design approach, like test-driven, ORM or SOA.

C. If you want a TDictionary kind of storage, take a look at our TDynArray wrapper, which handle the same methods but has some unique features like automated serialization or multiple indexes (not handled by TDictionary), which are mandatory for your request.

AFTER QUESTION UPDATE

Some code using TDynArray:

type
   TSummaryAppt = record
       Date : TDate;
       SA_ID : Integer;
       BusyFlag : Array[1..36] of Boolean; // 15 minute periods...
       PCTFree: Double;
       LargestFreeMinutes : integer;
   end;
   TSummaryApptDynArray = array of TSummaryAppt;

var rec: TSummaryAppt;
    SAs: TSummaryApptDynArray;
    SA: TDynArray;
    F: TFileStream;
begin
  SA.Init(TypeInfo(TSummaryApptDynArray),SAs);
  rec.Date := now;
  rec.SA_ID := 3;
  SA.Add(rec); // rec is now added in SAs[]
  assert(length(SAs)=1); // or SA.Count=1
  assert(SAs[0].SA_ID=3);
  for rec in SAs do // will work like any dynamic array
    ShowMessage(IntToStr(p.SA_ID));
  F := TFileStream.Create('datafile',fmCreate);
  SA.SaveToStream(F); // a TDictionary won't do that
  F.Free;
  SA.Clear;
  assert(length(SAs)=0); // or SA.Count=0
  F := TFileStream.Create('datafile',fmOpenRead);
  SA.LoadFromStream(F); // a TDictionary won't do that
  F.Free;
  assert(length(SAs)=1); // or SA.Count=1
  assert(SAs[0].SA_ID=3);
  for rec in SAs do // will work like any dynamic array
    ShowMessage(IntToStr(p.SA_ID));
  // you need nothing to free the memory, since both are handled by the compiler
 end;

Of course, your array may be stored directly in one block, since it contains only plain data (double, integer, booleans); but our TDynArray wrapper is able to handle any string or other dynamic array within.

Some code using our ORM:

type
 TBusyFlag = set (1..36);
 TSummaryAppt = class(TSQLRecord)
 private
   fDate : TDate;
   BusyFlag : TBusyFlag; // 15 minute periods...
   PCTFree: Double;
   LargestFreeMinutes : integer;
  published
   // already contains an ID: integer field
   property Date : TDate read fDate write fDate;
   property BusyFlag : TBusyFlag read fBusyFlag write fBusyFlag ; // 15 minute periods...
   property PCTFree: Double read fPCTFree write fPCTFree;
   property LargestFreeMinutes : integer read fLargestFreeMinutes write fLargestFreeMinutes;
end;

 // then initialize the database model and use your database:
 Model := TSQLModel.Create([TSummaryAppt]);
 Client := TSQLRestClientDB.Create(Model,nil,'FileName',TSQLRestServerDB);
 Client.Server.CreateMissingTables(0); // will create the database if needed
 ...
 rec := TSummaryAppt.Create;
 rec.Date := Now;
 rec.ID := 3; // but the ORM may create one unique ID for you
 Client.Add(rec);
 rec.Date := 0;
 Client.Retrieve(3,rec);
 ...    
 rec.Free;
 Client.Free;
 Model.Free;

Our ORM is here used locally, all in one executable, creating a SQLite3 database for data storage. But if you change TSQLRestClientDB into TSQLite3HttpClient and TSQLRestServerDB+TSQLite3HttpServer, you'll be able to use your data remotely, via standard JSON (and also from an AJAX application). Without modifying your client code. And if you want to store your data with something else than SQLite3 (even up to Oracle, or an in-memory database), you can.

share|improve this answer
    
Why would an array be better than a dictionary? Without justification that looks very odd indeed. I know you prefer old style code to modern generic collections from previous questions. But option C seems perverse to me. Or is this class actually a dictionary. –  David Heffernan Jan 22 '12 at 13:36
    
@DavidHeffernan If you follow the supplied link, you'll find out that TDynArray is a wrapper around a dynamic array: in fact, it provides methods to access to this array, all methods of TDictionary and more than TDictionary. It allows direct adding, insertion, deletion, search, sorting (including several ordered indexes), hashing (including FindAndUpdate, FindAndAddIfNotExisting methods), serialization (into binary or JSON), slice, reverse, nested arrays... and is easy to get around the biggest performance problem of a dynamic array, by using an external Count variable. –  Arnaud Bouchez Jan 22 '12 at 15:59
    
I did follow the link but it wasn't clear to me that such functionality was available. I'm not sure I'd recommend an object like this to self-confessed novice. There seems to be no type-safety, large amounts of pointer use exposed in the interface, and no use of generics. –  David Heffernan Jan 22 '12 at 16:17
    
Regarding your update code with TDynArray, you show some things that TDictionary can't do but you don't show how to get an item using the key. Could you add something to cover that? –  David Heffernan Jan 22 '12 at 18:02
1  
You are right, TDynArrayHash was added later - this is described in the forum posts, and the framework documentation / source code. You have nice methods like FindAndUpdate or FindAndAddIfNotExisting to work in a dynamic array like with a dictionary. You can even have several TDynArrayHash instances over the same dynamic array (those are just wrappers): so you can have several hashed access to the same data at once - try to do it with a TDictionary! –  Arnaud Bouchez Jan 24 '12 at 6:57

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