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for(int i = 1; i < 12; i++)
{
        for(int k=11; k > i; k--)
        {
                System.out.print("*");

        }
        System.out.print("\n");
}

I have the code above which displays a design like this:

**********
*********
********
*******
******
*****
****
***
**
*

I am wanting to swap it so that it looks like this:

**********
 *********
  ********
   *******
    ******
     *****
      ****
       ***
        **
         *

I know that I need to use a loop and System.out.print(" ") in some way to leave spaces.

Whats the best approach to use? I created two separate loops, but with the next line commands this wont work in two loops. How would I integrate that into one loop?

share|improve this question
1  
What about printing spaces, then n-(the number of spaces you printed) asterisks? –  Dave Newton Jan 22 '12 at 1:06
    
I forgot to add, I can only use System.out.print("*"), System.out.print(" ") and system.out.print("\n"). –  Brandon Jan 22 '12 at 1:08
    
Since this is homework, incorporate another valuable concept in programming: functions. Write a function that prints a character n times, for example, repeat(char c, int times) { ... }. Then, for each row, you will be calling the function once for spaces, and once for asterisks. –  Dilum Ranatunga Jan 22 '12 at 1:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For the second "picture": you'll have to print a variable number of spaces before the "*". That can be accomplished by using another loop before the loop that prints the "*", and knowing that every time you print a line, the number of spaces printed is incremented by one, and the number of asterisks is decremented by one.

EDIT :

Here's a hint, to get you started. Fill-in the blanks (and remove the comments):

int delta = /*fill*/;
for (int i = 0; i < /*fill*/; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < /*fill*/; j++) {
        System.out.print(" ");
    }
    for (int j = 0; j < /*fill*/; j++) {
        System.out.print("*");
    }
    delta += /*fill*/;
    System.out.print("\n");
}
share|improve this answer
    
After printing the spaces, is there any command to go back to the top? –  Brandon Jan 22 '12 at 1:18
    
No, you don't go back to the top there, first you print the spaces, then the asterisks, then the line break - and that completes a single line. The outermost loop will take you "back to the top" for you to deal with the next line. –  Óscar López Jan 22 '12 at 1:25
    
I like the concept of filling gaps ;) –  jjczopek Jan 22 '12 at 1:32
1  
@jjczopek I had no choice, I don't want to ruin the OP's homework :) –  Óscar López Jan 22 '12 at 1:35
    
So in the code I have above, would i put the added loop inside the first loop or inside of the second loop? –  Brandon Jan 22 '12 at 1:37

Use String.format to left pad your string with spaces.

share|improve this answer
    
The OP said that he can only use System.out.print(), so String.format() is out of the question. –  Óscar López Jan 22 '12 at 2:04
    
Sure, but that information was included in the comments, not the actual question. –  diggingforfire Jan 22 '12 at 2:13

Do it using a 2-D array!!! Its very simple and efficient that way!!

For the second result:- Put '*' in places if row_no <= column_no (the half matrix above diagonal plus the diagonal elements) else put a space " " in other places. Run this in loops for row and column. Then print the 2-D array row wise.

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You can use code blocks to indicate a piece of code. The formatting is also very nice. You can use them by surrounding the text with backticks ( ` ). –  PlasmaPower Mar 20 '14 at 6:22

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