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I have filter that I took from django but now I must import too much of django which I don't want and I must put the strange line in my file:

os.environ['DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE'] = 'locale'

This shouldn't be needed since I'm not using django. I use Jinja2 and I took the floatformat filter from django and using it with jinja2 which works if I do the crazy imports:

os.environ['DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE'] = 'locale'
from django.utils.encoding import force_unicode, iri_to_uri
from django.utils.safestring import mark_safe, SafeData, mark_for_escaping
from django.utils import formats
# Values for testing floatformat input against infinity and NaN representations,
# which differ across platforms and Python versions.  Some (i.e. old Windows
# ones) are not recognized by Decimal but we want to return them unchanged vs.
# returning an empty string as we do for completley invalid input.  Note these
# need to be built up from values that are not inf/nan, since inf/nan values do
# not reload properly from .pyc files on Windows prior to some level of Python 2.5
# (see Python Issue757815 and Issue1080440).
pos_inf = 1e200 * 1e200
neg_inf = -1e200 * 1e200
nan = (1e200 * 1e200) // (1e200 * 1e200)
special_floats = [str(pos_inf), str(neg_inf), str(nan)]

def floatformat(text, arg=-1):
    """
    Displays a float to a specified number of decimal places.

    If called without an argument, it displays the floating point number with
    one decimal place -- but only if there's a decimal place to be displayed:

    * num1 = 34.23234
    * num2 = 34.00000
    * num3 = 34.26000
    * {{ num1|floatformat }} displays "34.2"
    * {{ num2|floatformat }} displays "34"
    * {{ num3|floatformat }} displays "34.3"

    If arg is positive, it will always display exactly arg number of decimal
    places:

    * {{ num1|floatformat:3 }} displays "34.232"
    * {{ num2|floatformat:3 }} displays "34.000"
    * {{ num3|floatformat:3 }} displays "34.260"

    If arg is negative, it will display arg number of decimal places -- but
    only if there are places to be displayed:

    * {{ num1|floatformat:"-3" }} displays "34.232"
    * {{ num2|floatformat:"-3" }} displays "34"
    * {{ num3|floatformat:"-3" }} displays "34.260"

    If the input float is infinity or NaN, the (platform-dependent) string
    representation of that value will be displayed.
    """

    try:
        input_val = force_unicode(text)
        d = Decimal(input_val)
    except UnicodeEncodeError:
        return u''
    except InvalidOperation:
        if input_val in special_floats:
            return input_val
        try:
            d = Decimal(force_unicode(float(text)))
        except (ValueError, InvalidOperation, TypeError, UnicodeEncodeError):
            return u''
    try:
        p = int(arg)
    except ValueError:
        return input_val

    try:
        m = int(d) - d
    except (ValueError, OverflowError, InvalidOperation):
        return input_val

    if not m and p < 0:
        return formats.number_format(u'%d' % (int(d)), 0)

    if p == 0:
        exp = Decimal(1)
    else:
        exp = Decimal(u'1.0') / (Decimal(10) ** abs(p))
    try:
        # Avoid conversion to scientific notation by accessing `sign`, `digits`
        # and `exponent` from `Decimal.as_tuple()` directly.
        sign, digits, exponent = d.quantize(exp, ROUND_HALF_UP).as_tuple()
        digits = [unicode(digit) for digit in reversed(digits)]
        while len(digits) <= abs(exponent):
            digits.append(u'0')
        digits.insert(-exponent, u'.')
        if sign:
            digits.append(u'-')
        number = u''.join(reversed(digits))
        return formats.number_format(number, abs(p))
    except InvalidOperation:
        return input_val

Can I achieve this filter's function without the django imports and with no fake django setting that I just put there just because it asked for it?

Thank you for any help

Update

I copied insane amounts of django code for this little use case and it s still not working since I can't find the function get_real_languagethat I must take from django:

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
from datetime import datetime
from decimal import Decimal, InvalidOperation, ROUND_HALF_UP
import os
def datetimeformat(value, format='%H:%M / %d-%m-%Y'):
    return value.strftime(format)

def timesince(value, default="just now"):
    now = datetime.utcnow()
    diff = now - value
    periods = (
        (diff.days / 365, "year", "years"),
        (diff.days / 30, "month", "months"),
        (diff.days / 7, "week", "weeks"),
        (diff.days, "day", "days"),
        (diff.seconds / 3600, "hour", "hours"),
        (diff.seconds / 60, "minute", "minutes"),
        (diff.seconds, "second", "seconds"),
    )
    for period, singular, plural in periods:
        if period:
            return "%d %s ago" % (period, singular if period == 1 else plural)
    return default

def makeid(n, countrycode="46"):
    countrycode = str(countrycode)
    n = str(n)
    return "%s%s%s" % (countrycode, '0'*(12-len(countrycode)-len(n)), n)

# Values for testing floatformat input against infinity and NaN representations,
# which differ across platforms and Python versions.  Some (i.e. old Windows
# ones) are not recognized by Decimal but we want to return them unchanged vs.
# returning an empty string as we do for completley invalid input.  Note these
# need to be built up from values that are not inf/nan, since inf/nan values do
# not reload properly from .pyc files on Windows prior to some level of Python 2.5
# (see Python Issue757815 and Issue1080440).
pos_inf = 1e200 * 1e200
neg_inf = -1e200 * 1e200
nan = (1e200 * 1e200) // (1e200 * 1e200)
special_floats = [str(pos_inf), str(neg_inf), str(nan)]

def floatformat(text, arg=-1):
    """
    Displays a float to a specified number of decimal places.

    If called without an argument, it displays the floating point number with
    one decimal place -- but only if there's a decimal place to be displayed:

    * num1 = 34.23234
    * num2 = 34.00000
    * num3 = 34.26000
    * {{ num1|floatformat }} displays "34.2"
    * {{ num2|floatformat }} displays "34"
    * {{ num3|floatformat }} displays "34.3"

    If arg is positive, it will always display exactly arg number of decimal
    places:

    * {{ num1|floatformat:3 }} displays "34.232"
    * {{ num2|floatformat:3 }} displays "34.000"
    * {{ num3|floatformat:3 }} displays "34.260"

    If arg is negative, it will display arg number of decimal places -- but
    only if there are places to be displayed:

    * {{ num1|floatformat:"-3" }} displays "34.232"
    * {{ num2|floatformat:"-3" }} displays "34"
    * {{ num3|floatformat:"-3" }} displays "34.260"

    If the input float is infinity or NaN, the (platform-dependent) string
    representation of that value will be displayed.
    """

    try:
        input_val = force_unicode(text)
        d = Decimal(input_val)
    except UnicodeEncodeError:
        return u''
    except InvalidOperation:
        if input_val in special_floats:
            return input_val
        try:
            d = Decimal(force_unicode(float(text)))
        except (ValueError, InvalidOperation, TypeError, UnicodeEncodeError):
            return u''
    try:
        p = int(arg)
    except ValueError:
        return input_val

    try:
        m = int(d) - d
    except (ValueError, OverflowError, InvalidOperation):
        return input_val

    if not m and p < 0:
        return number_format(u'%d' % (int(d)), 0)

    if p == 0:
        exp = Decimal(1)
    else:
        exp = Decimal(u'1.0') / (Decimal(10) ** abs(p))
    try:
        # Avoid conversion to scientific notation by accessing `sign`, `digits`
        # and `exponent` from `Decimal.as_tuple()` directly.
        sign, digits, exponent = d.quantize(exp, ROUND_HALF_UP).as_tuple()
        digits = [unicode(digit) for digit in reversed(digits)]
        while len(digits) <= abs(exponent):
            digits.append(u'0')
        digits.insert(-exponent, u'.')
        if sign:
            digits.append(u'-')
        number = u''.join(reversed(digits))
        return number_format(number, abs(p))
    except InvalidOperation:
        return input_val



def force_unicode(s, encoding='utf-8', strings_only=False, errors='strict'):
    """
    Similar to smart_unicode, except that lazy instances are resolved to
    strings, rather than kept as lazy objects.

    If strings_only is True, don't convert (some) non-string-like objects.
    """
    if strings_only and is_protected_type(s):
        return s
    try:
        if not isinstance(s, basestring,):
            if hasattr(s, '__unicode__'):
                s = unicode(s)
            else:
                try:
                    s = unicode(str(s), encoding, errors)
                except UnicodeEncodeError:
                    if not isinstance(s, Exception):
                        raise
                    # If we get to here, the caller has passed in an Exception
                    # subclass populated with non-ASCII data without special
                    # handling to display as a string. We need to handle this
                    # without raising a further exception. We do an
                    # approximation to what the Exception's standard str()
                    # output should be.
                    s = ' '.join([force_unicode(arg, encoding, strings_only,
                            errors) for arg in s])
        elif not isinstance(s, unicode):
            # Note: We use .decode() here, instead of unicode(s, encoding,
            # errors), so that if s is a SafeString, it ends up being a
            # SafeUnicode at the end.
            s = s.decode(encoding, errors)
    except UnicodeDecodeError, e:
        if not isinstance(s, Exception):
            raise DjangoUnicodeDecodeError(s, *e.args)
        else:
            # If we get to here, the caller has passed in an Exception
            # subclass populated with non-ASCII bytestring data without a
            # working unicode method. Try to handle this without raising a
            # further exception by individually forcing the exception args
            # to unicode.
            s = ' '.join([force_unicode(arg, encoding, strings_only,
                    errors) for arg in s])
    return s

def pluralize(value, arg=u's'):
    """
    Returns a plural suffix if the value is not 1. By default, 's' is used as
    the suffix:

    * If value is 0, vote{{ value|pluralize }} displays "0 votes".
    * If value is 1, vote{{ value|pluralize }} displays "1 vote".
    * If value is 2, vote{{ value|pluralize }} displays "2 votes".

    If an argument is provided, that string is used instead:

    * If value is 0, class{{ value|pluralize:"es" }} displays "0 classes".
    * If value is 1, class{{ value|pluralize:"es" }} displays "1 class".
    * If value is 2, class{{ value|pluralize:"es" }} displays "2 classes".

    If the provided argument contains a comma, the text before the comma is
    used for the singular case and the text after the comma is used for the
    plural case:

    * If value is 0, cand{{ value|pluralize:"y,ies" }} displays "0 candies".
    * If value is 1, cand{{ value|pluralize:"y,ies" }} displays "1 candy".
    * If value is 2, cand{{ value|pluralize:"y,ies" }} displays "2 candies".
    """
    if not u',' in arg:
        arg = u',' + arg
    bits = arg.split(u',')
    if len(bits) > 2:
        return u''
    singular_suffix, plural_suffix = bits[:2]

    try:
        if int(value) != 1:
            return plural_suffix
    except ValueError: # Invalid string that's not a number.
        pass
    except TypeError: # Value isn't a string or a number; maybe it's a list?
        try:
            if len(value) != 1:
                return plural_suffix
        except TypeError: # len() of unsized object.
            pass
    return singular_suffix
pluralize.is_safe = False

def number_format(value, decimal_pos=None):
    """
    Formats a numeric value using localization settings
    """
    return format(
        value,
        get_format('DECIMAL_SEPARATOR'),
        decimal_pos,
        get_format('NUMBER_GROUPING'),
        get_format('THOUSAND_SEPARATOR'),
    )

def format(number, decimal_sep, decimal_pos, grouping=0, thousand_sep=''):
    """
    Gets a number (as a number or string), and returns it as a string,
    using formats definied as arguments:

    * decimal_sep: Decimal separator symbol (for example ".")
    * decimal_pos: Number of decimal positions
    * grouping: Number of digits in every group limited by thousand separator
    * thousand_sep: Thousand separator symbol (for example ",")

    """
    use_grouping = True#settings.USE_L10N and \
        #settings.USE_THOUSAND_SEPARATOR and grouping
    # Make the common case fast:
    if isinstance(number, int) and not use_grouping and not decimal_pos:
        return mark_safe(unicode(number))
    # sign
    if float(number) < 0:
        sign = '-'
    else:
        sign = ''
    str_number = unicode(number)
    if str_number[0] == '-':
        str_number = str_number[1:]
    # decimal part
    if '.' in str_number:
        int_part, dec_part = str_number.split('.')
        if decimal_pos:
            dec_part = dec_part[:decimal_pos]
    else:
        int_part, dec_part = str_number, ''
    if decimal_pos:
        dec_part = dec_part + ('0' * (decimal_pos - len(dec_part)))
    if dec_part: dec_part = decimal_sep + dec_part
    # grouping
    if use_grouping:
        int_part_gd = ''
        for cnt, digit in enumerate(int_part[::-1]):
            if cnt and not cnt % grouping:
                int_part_gd += thousand_sep
            int_part_gd += digit
        int_part = int_part_gd[::-1]
    return sign + int_part + dec_part

def get_format(format_type):
    """
    For a specific format type, returns the format for the current
    language (locale), defaults to the format in the settings.
    format_type is the name of the format, e.g. 'DATE_FORMAT'
    """
    format_type = smart_str(format_type)
    if True:#settings.USE_L10N:
        cache_key = (format_type, get_language())
        try:
            return _format_cache[cache_key] or getattr(settings, format_type)
        except KeyError:
            for module in get_format_modules():
                try:
                    val = getattr(module, format_type)
                    _format_cache[cache_key] = val
                    return val
                except AttributeError:
                    pass
            _format_cache[cache_key] = None
    return getattr(settings, format_type)

def smart_str(s, encoding='utf-8', strings_only=False, errors='strict'):
    """
    Returns a bytestring version of 's', encoded as specified in 'encoding'.

    If strings_only is True, don't convert (some) non-string-like objects.
    """
    if strings_only and isinstance(s, (types.NoneType, int)):
        return s
    if isinstance(s, Promise):
        return unicode(s).encode(encoding, errors)
    elif not isinstance(s, basestring):
        try:
            return str(s)
        except UnicodeEncodeError:
            if isinstance(s, Exception):
                # An Exception subclass containing non-ASCII data that doesn't
                # know how to print itself properly. We shouldn't raise a
                # further exception.
                return ' '.join([smart_str(arg, encoding, strings_only,
                        errors) for arg in s])
            return unicode(s).encode(encoding, errors)
    elif isinstance(s, unicode):
        return s.encode(encoding, errors)
    elif s and encoding != 'utf-8':
        return s.decode('utf-8', errors).encode(encoding, errors)
    else:
        return s

class Promise(object):
    """
    This is just a base class for the proxy class created in
    the closure of the lazy function. It can be used to recognize
    promises in code.
    """
    pass

def get_language():
    return real_get_language()
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are using only formats and force_unicode. Just copy these into your code and get rid of all imports.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. formats however appear to import much of django so if I copy that module to my code I will still have the django imports. –  Nick Rosencrantz Jan 22 '12 at 2:40
    
Copy just formats.number_format function. –  Alexander Artemenko Jan 22 '12 at 8:04
    
Thank you. I kind of failed since formats.number_format in its turn also reuires importing lots of django –  Nick Rosencrantz Jan 23 '12 at 7:04

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