Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Trying to implement the decorator pattern in C# from the code in the "Head First Design Patterns" book (written in Java).

I am just starting out with C# and am therefore still new to the syntax, so I am not sure why I can't get the commented line of code below to work.

Here is the first abstract-base class and its derived classes in the Decorator pattern:

using System;

public abstract class Beverage
{
    private String m_description;

    // get a description of the beverage
    public virtual String Description { get { return m_description; } }

    // calculate cost of the beverage
    public abstract double Cost();
}

// HouseBlend coffee implements Beverage
public class HouseBlend : Beverage
{
    // Constructor
    public HouseBlend() { m_description = "House Blend"; }

    // calculate base cost of House Blend
    public override double Cost() { return 0.89; }
}

// DarkRoast coffee implements Beverage
public class DarkRoast : Beverage
{
    // Constructor
    public DarkRoast() { m_description = "Dark Roast"; }

    // calculate base cost of Dark Roast
    public override double Cost() { return 1.00; }
}

// Espresso coffee implements Beverage
public class Espresso : Beverage
{
    // Constructor
    public Espresso() { m_description = "Espresso"; }

    // calculate base cost of Espresso
    public override double Cost() { return 1.99; }
}

The offending code is in the Cost() method of the Mocha class:

using System;

// abstract base class CondimentDecorator is-a Beverage
public abstract class CondimentDecorator : Beverage {}

// Mocha implements the CondimentDecorater
public class Mocha : CondimentDecorator
{
    // Condiment decorator has-a Beverage (recursion!)
    private Beverage m_beverage;

    // Constructor binds the object passed to member var
    public Mocha(Beverage beverage)
    {
        this.m_beverage = beverage;
    }

    // getter implements abstract class Description
    public override String Description
    {
        get
        {
            return m_beverage.Description + ", Mocha";
        }
    }

    // get the Cost of the condiment plus the base-cost
    // of the original beverage
    public new double Cost()               // ERROR: 'Mocha.Cost()' hides inherited
    {                                      // member 'Beverage.Cost()'
        return 0.20 + m_beverage.Cost();
    }
}
share|improve this question
8  
FYI although the book uses Java the book's website links to sample code in C# and C++. –  Ahmad Mageed Jan 22 '12 at 6:41
    
Good to know. I will check it out –  Dylan Jan 22 '12 at 7:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Change new to override. Also, m_description should be protected.

share|improve this answer
    
Derp. Declaring m_description as protected instead of private should have been a no-brainer... –  Dylan Jan 22 '12 at 7:43
    
I would advise keeping the local field as private and exposing it to inheritors via a protected property. –  Erik Dietrich Jan 22 '12 at 18:35
    
Not sure how this would be done... I already I have a property list for setting and getting m_description called Description, but I am not sure how this would be used to access the Cost() method of the beverage object. –  Dylan Jan 22 '12 at 18:55
    
@Dylan: What @Erik Dietrich is saying is the following: keep m_description as private. You can set the m_description by adding a constructor to Beverage that takes a string description and assigns it to m_description in the body of the constructor. Then call this constructor from each of the derived classes by constructor chaining. So, for Mocha, for example,` public Mocha() : base("Mocha") { }`. –  Jason Jan 22 '12 at 20:22

You have declared the Cost() method of Mocha as new instead of override. See here the difference: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/csharpfaq/archive/2004/03/12/what-s-the-difference-between-code-override-code-and-code-new-code.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that explanation; now I see the difference. –  Dylan Jan 22 '12 at 7:43

This is how should your code look.

public abstract class Beverage
{
    protected string m_description = "Unknown Beverage";

    public virtual string GetDescription()
    {
        return m_description;
    }

    public abstract double Cost();
}

public abstract class CondimentDecorator : Beverage
{
}

public class Espresso : Beverage
{
    public Espresso()
    {
        m_description = "Espresso";
    }

    public override double Cost()
    {
        return 1.99;
    }
}

public class HouseBlend : Beverage
{
    public HouseBlend()
    {
        m_description = "House Blend Coffe";
    }

    public override double Cost()
    {
        return 0.89;
    }
}

public class DarkRoast : Beverage
{
    public DarkRoast()
    {
        m_description = "Dark Roast";
    }

    public override double Cost()
    {
        return 0.99;
    }
}

public class Mocha : CondimentDecorator
{
    Beverage beverage;

    public Mocha(Beverage beverage)
    {
        this.beverage = beverage;
    }

    public override string GetDescription()
    {
        return beverage.GetDescription() + ", Mocha";
    }

    public override double Cost()
    {
        return 0.20 + beverage.Cost();
    }
}

public class Soy : CondimentDecorator
{
    Beverage beverage;

    public Soy(Beverage beverage)
    {
        this.beverage = beverage;
    }

    public override string GetDescription()
    {
        return beverage.GetDescription() + ", Soy";
    }

    public override double Cost()
    {
        return 0.15 + beverage.Cost();
    }
}

public class Whip : CondimentDecorator
{
    Beverage beverage;

    public Whip(Beverage beverage)
    {
        this.beverage = beverage;
    }

    public override string GetDescription()
    {
        return beverage.GetDescription() + ", Whip";
    }

    public override double Cost()
    {
        return 0.10 + beverage.Cost();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.