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I have a been reading up on email obfuscation.

I found an interesting post entitled Best Method for Email Obfuscation? - By Jeff Starr where he describes various tests preformed over 1.5 years by Silvan Mühlemann.

According to this study, css obfustication was 100% effective throughout the 1.5-year test, despite its various downsides.

Seeing as i was playing around with this method of obfustication before, i decided to give it another go, with the addition of a php function that i came accross.

Here is the function:

// Converts email and tel into html special characters
function convert_email_adr($email)
{
    $pieces = str_split(trim($email));
    $new_mail = '';
    foreach ($pieces as $val)
    {
        $new_mail .= '&#'.ord($val).';';
    }
    return $new_mail; 
}

And here is the php using that function.

$lstEmail = convert_email_adr("{$row['email']}");

This does exactly as described, and i would assume that this would work out quite well, assuming the harvesters have not written code that identifies the string of special chars and decodes them.

So i decided, what if i combined these two methods, as in, i break the string into special chars, then use strrev on it, then use css to reverse the string... Simple...

Here is the added peice of php that reverses the actual string as seen in the page source:

$lstEmail = strrev($lstEmail);

and the css to reverse it again on the client side:

span.obfuscate { unicode-bidi:bidi-override; direction: rtl; }

And the html:

<p><span class='listHeadings'>eMail:</span> <span class='obfuscate' style='font-size:0.6em;'><a href='mailto: $lstEmail?subject=Testing 123'>$lstEmail</a></span></p>

But the problem is that the string is now in reverse and will not be validated... Here is an example:

;901#&;111#&;99#&;64#&;801#&;501#&;79#&;901#&;301#&;46#&;411#&;101#&;001#&;011#&;111#&;611#&;011#&;79#&;811#&;301#&;501#&;79#&;411#&;99#&

What happens is that the special characters are not decoded into actual characters, so all you see is the string of special character in reverse.

There is also the downside as described by Jeff Starr, that you cannot use the css method in mailto as you cannot use the span tag within the href attribute.

So now i am truly stuck at an odds of how to go about this task. I guess i might be able to live with forcing people to input my email address themselves if they would like to mail me... But, on the other hand, i am not so sure about that.

Then there comes the task of validating special characters in reverse...

Would anyone be able to provide me with any type of input or support in this regard? Also any suggestions in different, LEGITIMATE ways of going about this task would be greatly appreciated!!

I say legitimate because i plan to use these functions in one of my live projects that is a business listing website (currently using the php function above)... The last thing i want to do is start playing around and create a gap and let out a bunch of info for the spammers! I think that would be very bad for business...

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1  
I would say that the problem with any obsfucation is that you cannot measure the people trying to contact you who get turned away. In the article linked he says that the method was 100% effective, then moves on. It's abundantly clear that it may have been 100% effective at preventing spam harvesting, NOT 100% effective at allowing continued communication from people looking to actually use the email address. –  Kzqai Jan 26 '12 at 17:27
    
@Tchalvak That is a good point... But i mean in a circumstance like this, would it not be preferable to turn away some users in the hope of better security(less spam) for the majorirty of them? –  IndigoIdentity Jan 27 '12 at 3:53
    
The problem is that without robust tests in place (e.g. javascript counter that pings the server on clicks of the obsfucated email addres or something), you don't how many people are being turned away. And people are often turned away by little obstacles, like email addresses with all the characters reversed when they click them... –  Kzqai Jan 27 '12 at 5:05
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just reverse it before you obfuscate it...

$email  = 'blah@whatever.co.uk';
$new    = convert_email_adr($email);

echo '<span style="unicode-bidi:bidi-override; direction: rtl;">'.$new.'</span>';

function convert_email_adr($email, $reverse = true, $obfuscate = true)
{
    $email = trim($email);

    if($reverse)
    {
        $email  = strrev($email);
    }

    if($obfuscate)
    {
        $pieces = str_split($email);
        $email  = '';

        foreach($pieces as $piece)
        {
            $email .= '&#'.ord($piece).';';
        }
    }

    return $email; 
}
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Generally, a good solution to this is to provide a layer of abstraction around the email address entirely, by which I mean instead of just the email address, providing a contact form. They fill in their info, submit it, and your server sends along the information to the proper email address.

That's not an especially scalable approach, though, generally mostly applicable to a single "contact me" situation, not a "here are our listings of companies to contact" situation, in which case obsfucation is running directly counter to your goal of making sure the customers can contact the targets with as much ease as possible. In that case you generally want to go with good spam protection.

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Why don't you use it that way?

function convert_email_adr($email)
{
    $pieces = str_split(strrev(trim($email)));
    $new_mail = '';
    foreach ($pieces as $val)
    {
        $new_mail .= '&#'.ord($val).';';
    }
    return $new_mail; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting... But still within the scope of my original input, thus allowing for the same side effect. –  IndigoIdentity Jan 27 '12 at 3:54
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As webmaster I always put my email in plain text on the contact site. Its the most comfortable solution for the visitors and it works independent if css is supported or js.

I do this with several emails since 10 years .. yes I got some spam but not that much, about 3-5 a day. I've got a good spam filter and watch over the spam once a week and delete it.

I do not use mailto because a lot of people do not have configured a local email-program and do not know what to do with the popup when clicking the mailto-link.

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Thanks for the input. You present a good point, but in my opinion, although 3-5 spam mails a day may not be much, to some of my clients that could be unacceptable... I cannot expect each and every single one of them to understand what spam is, and how to avoid it. With that said, I think that one spam mail for them, caused through my site... Would be bad for business as a whole. The point you have present about mailto is valid and something i have thought about... But being a listing service, one might expect such functionality. –  IndigoIdentity Jan 22 '12 at 7:52
    
Was going to plus 1 until I got to the "I do not use mailto" part. Totally pointless. –  Kzqai Jan 26 '12 at 17:27
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