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I would like to templatize "first" type of std::pair using the following construction

template <typename T>
struct TPair
{
typedef std::pair <T, short> Type;
};

and create a vector of such pairs.

template <typename T>
struct TPairs
{
typedef std::vector <TPair <T> > Type;
};

But this code seems to be screwed for common usage and it is uncomfortable:

TPair <double> ::Type my_pair (1.0, 0 ); //Create pairs
TPair <double> my_pair2 (1.0, 0 ); //Create object, needs a constructor

TPairs <double> ::Type pairs; //Create vector
TPairs <double> pairs2; //Create object

pairs.push_back(my_pair); //Need a constructor
pairs2.push_back(my_pair); //No push_back method for the structure...
....

Is there any more simple and comfortable solution?

share|improve this question
    
Also you shouldn't have typedef in defining the vector of pair, you are thereby not declaring a vector, but an alias type. – Tamer Shlash Jan 22 '12 at 11:28
1  
@Mr.TAMER: I think that's intentional. I think the OP wants a "typedef template". I think these were added to the standard in C++11. – Oliver Charlesworth Jan 22 '12 at 11:30
up vote 2 down vote accepted
template <typename T>
struct TPairs
{
  typedef std::vector <TPair <T> > Type;
};

There's a problem here: you're creating a type that is a vector of TPair<T>, which is in fact not what you want. You want a vector of TPair<T>::Type.

template <typename T>
struct TPairs
{
  typedef std::vector <typename TPair <T>::Type > Type;
};

As for your use cases, remember that those two structs you created are there just to simulate a template typedef, you should never instantiate them at all, just use their Type member typedef. So:

TPair <double> ::Type my_pair (1.0, 0 ); // Good, creates a std::pair
TPair <double> my_pair2 (1.0, 0 ); // Not good, does not create an std::pair


TPairs <double> ::Type pairs; //Good, creates a vector
TPairs <double> pairs2;       //Not good, doesn't create a vector

pairs.push_back(my_pair);   // Ok, does what you mean
pairs2.push_back(my_pair);  // Can't compile, the `TPairs` struct ins't a vector
share|improve this answer
1  
You could add private constructors to the "wrapper" types. – Oliver Charlesworth Jan 22 '12 at 11:54
    
@ Mat: Thanks for your expanation and examples, it works fine. For more simple construction I have to wait some time (maybe for VS 2012 :-)) ) – justik Jan 22 '12 at 11:59

It sounds like you want a "template alias" which apparently was added to the standard with C++11. The syntax in your case would be something like:

template <typename T>
using TPair = std::pair<T,short>;

template <typename T>
using TPairs = std::vector<TPair<T>>;

[Disclaimer: I haven't tried this, so it may be nonsense.]

share|improve this answer
    
+1. That is correct, Oli. It is not "nonsense". – Nawaz Jan 22 '12 at 11:40
    
@ Oli: Thanks, but this feauture is still not supported by the VS 2010 :-(. – justik Jan 22 '12 at 11:40

why not simple use inheritance? For instance:

template <typename T>
struct TPair : public std::pair< T, short >{};

template <typename T> 
struct TPairs : public std::vector< TPair< T > >  {};
share|improve this answer

If you're feeling adventurous, you can just inherit from the types you want to templatize and provide proper constructors. :)

#include <utility> // forward

template<class T>
struct TPair
  : public std::pair<T, short>
{
private:
  typedef std::pair<T, short> base;

public:
  template<class U>
  TPair(U&& u, short s) // forwarding ctor
    : base(std::forward<U>(u), s) {}

  TPair(TPair const& other) // copy ctor
    : base(static_cast<base const&>(other)) {}

  TPair(TPair&& other) // move ctor
    : base(static_cast<base&&>(other)) {

  // and assignment operators... I'll leave those as an exercise
};

// and the same for TVector... again, I'll leave those as an exercise. :>
share|improve this answer
    
@ Xeo: An interesting solution... – justik Jan 22 '12 at 12:40

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