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I have two packages client and server:

enter image description here

the client package contains an interface "I_object":

package client;

import java.rmi.Remote;

import java.rmi.RemoteException;

public interface I_object extends Remote {  

public int Add(int a,int b) throws RemoteException;

}

and a class main_client:

package client;
import java.net.MalformedURLException;
import java.rmi.Naming;
import java.rmi.NotBoundException;
import java.rmi.RemoteException;

/**
*
* @author marwen
*/

public class main_client {


public static void main(String [] args) throws NotBoundException,  MalformedURLException, RemoteException{

 I_object obj_distant=(I_object) Naming.lookup("rmi://localhost:1000/exemple");

 System.out.println(obj_distant.Add(5, 9));    

}
}

The server package contains a class(impl_object ) that implements the interface I_object:

package server;

import java.rmi.RemoteException;

import java.rmi.server.UnicastRemoteObject;


/**
*
* @author marwen
*/
public class impl_object  extends UnicastRemoteObject implements I_object {

public impl_object() throws RemoteException
{}

public int Add(int a,int b) throws RemoteException{
return a+b;
}

}

and finally a main_server:

package server;

import java.net.MalformedURLException;

import java.rmi.Naming;

import java.rmi.NotBoundException;

import java.rmi.RemoteException;


public class main_server {

public static void main(String [] args) throws NotBoundException, MalformedURLException, RemoteException{

    impl_object obj=new impl_object();

   java.rmi.registry.LocateRegistry.createRegistry(1000);

   Naming.rebind("rmi://localhost:1000/exemple", obj);

 System.out.println("server is running");
}
}

if you noticed in the implementation of "impl_object" , i have not put an "import client.I_object;" why??????? okay , precisely, if I put an "import client.I_object;" to the client package, So the server will be "linked" to the client !!! that's the problem , When I separate the client and the server (I put the server on a remote computer and the client at home)???.... Can someone explain to me, I'm wrong?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

EDITED ANSWER:

You can your interface and impl class into a separate package like model and then import them from this package if you like. Impl object is the object used by both server and client it doesn't bind them in this way (client only way). It's UnicastRemoteObject to be used with JRMP and they both have to be aware of this object.

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I poorly explained, I rephrase my question: is what I should rewrite the interface "I_object" in the server package, or I need to import it from the client package ? thanks ^^ –  Smarty Twiti Jan 22 '12 at 12:39
    
you can put your interface and impl class into a separate package like model and then import them from there if you like. Impl object is the object used by both server and client it doesn't bind them in this way. It's UnicastRemoteObject to be used with RMI and it doesn't bind them in this sense but has to be used in order to use RMI calls. –  Sergey Benner Jan 22 '12 at 12:45
    
This explanation is incorrect. If there is a Registry running in the host you can use any IP address you like to bind things to it with Naming.bind(). This has nothing to do with server socket bind addresses, which is what I think you are really talking about. Those are controlled via the java.rmi.server.hostname property. –  EJP Feb 6 '12 at 9:22
    
Yes, answer is misleading indeed. I've answered the real question in the comment. The question was about where to put the interface and the UnicastRemoteObject in order to be used, and in this case it is used by both server and the client and they have to be aware of this object, and YES it's listening to all interfaces tcp 0 0 :::1000 :::* LISTEN. I can re-phrase the answer if need be. –  Sergey Benner Feb 6 '12 at 9:55
    
Your comment is just as bad. The Impl object is not used by the client. "It doesn't bind them in this way" and "it doesn't bind them in this sense" are both meaningless. Remote objects do not have to extend UnicastRemoteObject. I suggest you start again. –  EJP Feb 7 '12 at 9:12

I put an "import client.I_object;" to the client package, So the server will be "linked" to the client

The word "linked" is meaningless in Java. If you're concerned about class leakage, you could put the remote interface, and any application objects it depends on, into a third package that is common to both the server and the client.

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