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I have the following 3 tables as part of a simple "item tagging" schema:

==Items==

  • ItemId int
  • Brand varchar
  • Name varchar
  • Price money
  • Condition varchar
  • Description varchar
  • Active bit

==Tags==

  • TagId int
  • Name varchar
  • Active bit

==TagMap==

  • TagMapId int
  • TagId int (fk)
  • ItemId int (fk)
  • Active bit

I want to write a LINQ query to bring back Items that match a list of tags (e.g. TagId = 2,3,4,7). In my application context, examples of items would be "Computer Monitor", "Dress Shirt", "Guitar", etc. and examples of tags would be "electronics", "clothing", etc. I would normally accomplish this with a SQL IN Statement.

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Why the inner join is not prefered here? You know if the Context.TagMaps contains 10 records , it will iterate 36 times in background , irrespective of the fact that whether there is a match or not. –  Pankaj Apr 3 '12 at 12:41
1  
You may find SQL queries in LINQ helpful. It's a list of common SQL queries represented in LINQ. –  Steven Wexler Mar 24 at 5:51

6 Answers 6

up vote 31 down vote accepted

Something like

var TagIds = {12, 32, 42}

var q = from map in Context.TagMaps 
        where TagIds.Contains(map.TagId)
        select map.Items;

should do what you need. This will generate an In ( 12, 32, 42 ) clause (or more specifically a parameterized IN clause if I'm not mistaken).

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it comes into play through the select map.Item part. In SQL you would have to join the TagMap to the Item table. Linq does that for you because of the relationship from TagMap to Item. You are essentially saying "find all TagMaps that reference any of my TagIds and return me their item". This Linq query is the same as the following SQL: SELECT Items.* FROM TagMaps INNER JOIN Items ON Item.ItemId = TagMap.ItemId WHERE TagMaps.TagId IN (12,32,24) Linq takes care of the INNER JOIN part for you, because it knows how to go from TagMap to Item. –  Denis Troller May 22 '09 at 2:43
    
Why the inner join is not prefered here? You know if the Context.TagMaps contains 10 records , it will iterate 36 times in background , irrespective of the fact that whether there is a match or not. –  Pankaj Apr 3 '12 at 12:41

given array of items:

var list = new int[] {2,3,4}

use:

where list.Contains(tm.TagId)
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I don't understand how that would work given the 3 table schema I have. –  Brian David Berman May 22 '09 at 2:30
List<int> tagIds = new List<int>() {2, 3, 4, 7};
int tagIdCount = tagIds.Count;
    //
// Items that have any of the tags
//  (any item may have any of the tags, not necessarily all of them
    //
var ItemsAnyTags = db.Items
  .Where(item => item.TagMaps
    .Any(tm => tagIds.Contains(tm.TagId))
  );

    //
// Items that have ALL of the tags
//  (any item may have extra tags that are not mentioned).
    //
var ItemIdsForAllTags = db.TagMap
  .Where(tm => tagIds.Contains(tm.TagId))
  .GroupBy(tm => tm.ItemId)
  .Where(g => g.Count() == tagIdCount)
  .Select(g => g.Key);
    //
var ItemsWithAllTags = db.Items
  .Where(item => ItemsIdsForAllTags.Contains(item.ItemId));

//runs just one query against the database
List<Item> result = ItemsWithAllTags.ToList();
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You can simply use,

var TagIds = {12, 32, 42}
var prod =entities.TagMaps.Where(tagmaps=> TagIds .Contains(tagmaps.TagId));
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string[] names = {"John", "Cassandra", "Sarah"};

var results = (from n in db.Names
               where names.Contains(n.Name)
               select n).ToList();
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