Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for some command-line tools for Linux that can help me detect and convert files from character sets like iso-8859-1 and windows-1252 to utf-8 and from Windows line endings to Unix line endings.

The reason I need this is that I'm working on projects on Linux servers via SFTP with editors on Windows (like Sublime Text) that just constantly screws these things up. Right now I'm guessing about half my files are utf-8, the rest are iso-8859-1 and windows-1252 as it seems Sublime Text is just picking character set by which symbols the file contains when I save it. The line endings are ALWAYS Windows line endings even though I've specified in the options that default line endings are LF, so about half of my files have LF and half are CRLF.

So I would need at least a tool that would recursively scan my project folder and alert me of files that deviate from utf-8 with LF line endings so I could manually fix that before I commit my changes to GIT.

Any comments and personal experiences on the topic would also be welcome.

Thanks


Edit: I have a temporary solution in place where I use tree and file to output information about every file in my project, but it's kinda wonky. If I don't include the -i option for file then a lot of my files gets different output like ASCII C++ program text and HTML document text and English text etc:

$ tree -f -i -a -I node_modules --noreport -n | xargs file | grep -v directory
./config.json:              ASCII C++ program text
./debugserver.sh:           ASCII text
./.gitignore:               ASCII text, with no line terminators
./lib/config.js:            ASCII text
./lib/database.js:          ASCII text
./lib/get_input.js:         ASCII text
./lib/models/stream.js:     ASCII English text
./lib/serverconfig.js:      ASCII text
./lib/server.js:            ASCII text
./package.json:             ASCII text
./public/index.html:        HTML document text
./src/config.coffee:        ASCII English text
./src/database.coffee:      ASCII English text
./src/get_input.coffee:     ASCII English text, with CRLF line terminators
./src/jtv.coffee:           ASCII English text
./src/models/stream.coffee: ASCII English text
./src/server.coffee:        ASCII text
./src/serverconfig.coffee:  ASCII text
./testserver.sh:            ASCII text
./vendor/minify.json.js:    ASCII C++ program text, with CRLF line terminators

But if I do include -i it doesn't show me line terminators:

$ tree -f -i -a -I node_modules --noreport -n | xargs file -i | grep -v directory
./config.json:              text/x-c++; charset=us-ascii
./debugserver.sh:           text/plain; charset=us-ascii
./.gitignore:               text/plain; charset=us-ascii
./lib/config.js:            text/plain; charset=us-ascii
./lib/database.js:          text/plain; charset=us-ascii
./lib/get_input.js:         text/plain; charset=us-ascii
./lib/models/stream.js:     text/plain; charset=us-ascii
./lib/serverconfig.js:      text/plain; charset=us-ascii
./lib/server.js:            text/plain; charset=us-ascii
./package.json:             text/plain; charset=us-ascii
./public/index.html:        text/html; charset=us-ascii
./src/config.coffee:        text/plain; charset=us-ascii
./src/database.coffee:      text/plain; charset=us-ascii
./src/get_input.coffee:     text/plain; charset=us-ascii
./src/jtv.coffee:           text/plain; charset=us-ascii
./src/models/stream.coffee: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
./src/server.coffee:        text/plain; charset=us-ascii
./src/serverconfig.coffee:  text/plain; charset=us-ascii
./testserver.sh:            text/plain; charset=us-ascii
./vendor/minify.json.js:    text/x-c++; charset=us-ascii

Also why does it display charset=us-ascii and not utf-8? And what's text/x-c++? Is there a way I could output only charset=utf-8 and line-terminators=LF for each file?

share|improve this question
    
As for a workaround, perhaps you could include a comment with a decidedly non-ASCII character code (the copyright symbol comes to mind) and save as UTF-8 - perhaps this would be enough for Sublime Text to stop guessing so much. –  tripleee Jan 27 '12 at 13:53
1  
I also cannot for the life of me get Sublime Text to just use freaking Unix line breaks for the love of God!! "default_line_ending": "unix" should just work! –  jlarson Apr 20 '12 at 17:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The solution I ended up with is the two Sublime Text 2 plugins "EncodingHelper" and "LineEndings". I now get both the file encoding and line endings in the status bar:

Sublime Text 2 status bar

If the encoding is wrong, I can File->Save with Encoding. If the line endings are wrong, the latter plugin comes with commands for changing the line endings:

Sublime Text 2 commands

share|improve this answer
    
Distressingly, the "LineEndings" plugin is gone... –  Hubro Oct 6 '14 at 12:53

If a file has no BOM, and no 'interesting characters' within the amount of text that file looks at, file concludes that it is ASCII ISO-646 -- a strict subset of UTF-8. You might find that putting BOMs on all your files encourages all these Windows tools to behave; the convention of a BOM on a UTF-8 file originated on Windows. Or it might make things worse. As for x/c++, well, that's just file tryin' to be helpful, and failing. You javascript has something in it that looks like C++.

Apache Tika has an encoding detector; you could even use the command-line driver that comes with it as an alternative to file. It will stick to MIME types and not wander off to C++.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explanations. As for using Apache Tika's encoding detector... It feels like acquiring a cruise ship to cross a puddle. What I'm apparently looking for is a command line tool for analysing files that will give me the output I'm looking for, which is character encoding and line terminators –  Hubro Jan 22 '12 at 14:58
    
Just make sure the puddle doesn't have a reef. Really, using their CLI is just 'using a command'. I don't recall if icu4c includes a command that would be a competitive alternative, or whether using iconv with the right options would give you a clear error for non-UTF-8. –  bmargulies Jan 22 '12 at 15:34
    
Beware that file sometimes uses rather crude heuristics - your x-c++ example shows it making a wrong guess. If you know exactly what you are looking for, a few simple grep commands can help you categorize your files. –  tripleee Jan 22 '12 at 16:24

Instead of file, try a custom program to check just the things you want. Here is a quick hack, mainly based on some Google hits, which were incidentally written by @ikegami.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Encode qw( decode );

use vars (qw(@ARGV));

@ARGV > 0 or die "Usage: $0 files ...\n";

for my $filename (@ARGV)
{
    my $terminator = 'CRLF';
    my $charset = 'UTF-8';
    local $/;
    undef $/;
    my $file;
    if (open (F, "<", $filename))
    {
        $file = <F>;
        close F;    
        # Don't print bogus data e.g. for directories
        unless (defined $file)
        {
            warn "$0: Skipping $filename: $!\n;
            next;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        warn "$0: Could not open $filename: $!\n";
        next;
    }

    my $have_crlf = ($file =~ /\r\n/);
    my $have_cr = ($file =~ /\r(?!\n)/);
    my $have_lf = ($file =~ /(?!\r\n).\n/);
    my $sum = $have_crlf + $have_cr + $have_lf;
    if ($sum == 0)
    {
        $terminator = "no";
    }
    elsif ($sum > 2)
    {
        $terminator = "mixed";
    }
    elsif ($have_cr)    
    {
        $terminator = "CR";
    }
    elsif ($have_lf)
    {
        $terminator = "LF";
    }

    $charset = 'ASCII' unless ($file =~ /[^\000-\177]/);

    $charset = 'unknown'
        unless eval { decode('UTF-8', $file, Encode::FB_CROAK); 1 };

    print "$filename: charset $charset, $terminator line endings\n";
}

Note that this has no concept of legacy 8-bit encodings - it will simply throw unknown if it's neither pure 7-bit ASCII nor proper UTF-8.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.