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I have following Javascript objects:

function Alfa() {
  this.status='';
  this.setStatus = function(value) {
    this.status=value
  }
}

function Beta() {
  this.setSomething = function(setter) {
    setter('Something');
  }
}

And than execution:

alf=new Alfa();
alf.setStatus('foo');

This works fine, if you look into values of alf, the status is set to 'foo', but:

bet=new Beta();
bet.setSomething(a.setStatus);

What I have expected is that bet will execute setStatus function of alf and set status value to 'something', however, this is not happening. setStatus of alf is executed, but this points not to alf instance but to Window, so the property status is set for Window not for alf.

What is the proper approach to get desired functionality?

This is of course simplified implementation, in real life i want to pass those functions of alf to event handlers, so I cannot change Beta implementation, eg:

$('xxx').click(alf.setStatus)
share|improve this question
    
I can at least one error: you pass a.setStatus to bet.setSomething() but where is a declared? –  Fabio Buda Jan 22 '12 at 13:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

JavaScript functions are unbound. That means this is determined by how it's invoked rather than how it was defined. Because you are invoking the method from within bet, then this is bet

To get around this you need to make a bound function, which creates a stable this no matter how the function is invoked.

If you are using an ES5 compatible JavaScript interpreter then you can use: Function.bind

alf.setStatus.bind(alf)

Or if you arent there are several es5 shims that provide this functionality in older interpreters. In fact one is provided on the mdn reference for bind. JQuery has a version called $.proxy

A simple implementation is that you want a function that takes a function and a scope. And then calls your method in that scope specifically, rather than using this. Something like.

function bind(func,o) { return function() { func.call(o); } }
share|improve this answer
    
the correct would be alf.setStatus.bind(alf), as the syntax is fn.bind(context) –  Marcelo Diniz Jan 22 '12 at 13:44
    
Yes sorry. I'm on the train and trying to type this on my phone. Auto correct also got my a few times. Making an edit. –  32bitkid Jan 22 '12 at 13:46
1  
+1 for mentioning $.proxy, as I usually use underscore.js _.bind() –  Marcelo Diniz Jan 22 '12 at 13:48
    
$.proxy from jQuery will do the trick. Thanx! –  KrzysDan Jan 22 '12 at 14:08

Change setter('Something'); to setter.call(this, 'Something'); will be work.

share|improve this answer
    
"so I cannot change Beta implementation" –  KrzysDan Jan 22 '12 at 14:03
function Alfa() {
    this.status='';
    this.setStatus = function(value) {
        this.status=value
    }
}
function Beta() {
    this.status='';
    this.setSomething = function(setter) {
        setter.call(this,'Something');
     }
}
share|improve this answer

Functions in JavaScript don't have a context attached to them, like e.g. bound methods in Python. So what you can do is to call setStatus functions with a context, like this:

bet.setSomething(function(value) {
    a.setStatus.call(a, value);
});

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Function/call

share|improve this answer
    
"so I cannot change Beta implementation" –  KrzysDan Jan 22 '12 at 14:03
    
And additionally this reduces the functionality of Beta objects (as it has to know that there is method setStatus of alfa objects) So not the best idea –  KrzysDan Jan 22 '12 at 14:11

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