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Is any probability that a test object will be deallocated before [self saveContext] ?

NSEntityDescription *entity = [NSEntityDescription entityForName:@"Test" inManagedObjectContext:[self managedObjectContext]];
for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) 
{
 Test *test = [[[Test alloc] initWithEntity:entity insertIntoManagedObjectContext:[self managedObjectContext]] autorelease];
 test.text = @"Text";
 test.index = [NSNumber numberWithInt:i];
}
[self saveContext];
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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

No, unless under a couple of specific circumstances, and lets figure out why. Assuming this is on the main thread, before your selector is called, then the system will create a NSAutoreleasePool for you, before your function and then after.

So, if when expanded, your code looks like this:

NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init]
NSEntityDescription *entity = [NSEntityDescription entityForName:@"Test" 
inManagedObjectContext:[self managedObjectContext]];
for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) 
{
 Test *test = [[[Test alloc] initWithEntity:entity insertIntoManagedObjectContext:[self managedObjectContext]] autorelease];
 test.text = @"Text";
 test.index = [NSNumber numberWithInt:i];
}
[self saveContext];
[pool drain];

entity would be released immediately after your function exits, which is after [self saveContext]. ARC would solve a lot of these problems, if you chose to enable it.

Warning!

Please note that this is not the actual code apple uses, the pool is only drained every frame, not every method, but when memory runs thin, the autorelease pool will automatically drain, so, IF your device is running out of memory, then theoretically, this could cause entity to be released early, but if that happens, you have other problems to worry about.

Also note that when dealing with threads, you must create your own autorelease pool, the system will NOT do that for you. That is not what you appear to be doing here, but if the situation does occur, remember to wrap your selector in an @autorelease block.

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i think he's asking about the test object not entity. –  madmik3 Jan 22 '12 at 15:08
    
Same principle, unless a memory warning is triggered, there should be no problems. –  Richard J. Ross III Jan 22 '12 at 15:12
    
i think threading can mess it up and the answer has to be yes. it can cause problems. don't do it. release it after you do the save. –  madmik3 Jan 22 '12 at 15:15
1  
There is nothing wrong with calling autorelease in normal situations where you know you aren't using threads, or running out of memory, so, as a general rule, this code is just as good as anything using manual retain/release cycles. –  Richard J. Ross III Jan 22 '12 at 15:20

yes. but I think it would require a thread.

Any time an object is sent -autorelease, it's added to the highest level autorelease pool. As long as you aren't creating any new autorelease pools in method B or further down the call stack, method A's pool should be the highest level pool.

form here What is the scope of (nested) autorelease pools?

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Even if you create a new pool in method B, objects from method A will not be added to it, as they aren't in the same context. –  Fabian Kreiser Jan 22 '12 at 19:28

By autorelease scope I assume that you mean when the autorelease pool will be drained. You can define an autorelease scope with the syntax:

NSEntityDescription *entity = [NSEntityDescription entityForName:@"Test" inManagedObjectContext:[self managedObjectContext]];
@autoreleasepool {
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) 
    {
        Test *test = [[[Test alloc] initWithEntity:entity insertIntoManagedObjectContext:[self managedObjectContext]] autorelease];
        test.text = @"Text";
        test.index = [NSNumber numberWithInt:i];
    }
    [self saveContext];
}

In the normal case, the autorelease pool will be drained when execution hits the idle loop, but this can be changed in your program.

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2  
@autoreleasepool is not for ARC only, it still works in a reference counted environment as well, and is just as useful. –  Richard J. Ross III Jan 22 '12 at 15:13
    
Oh, I didn't know that, but you are right. From the docs: "@autoreleasepool blocks are more efficient than using an instance of NSAutoreleasePool directly; you can also use them even if you do not use ARC". Thanks! –  Krumelur Jan 22 '12 at 15:16

Put simple:
If you don't play with autorelease pools yourself, all your objects are safe within a method, function, or block.

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Not in all situations, for example, if you are dealing with threads, thats a whole other beast, or, if you device runs out of memory, the first thing that the application does is drains and recreates the autoreleasepools, to save memory. –  Richard J. Ross III Jan 22 '12 at 15:15
    
The main autorelease pool is not drained until your method returns. No way. –  Fabian Kreiser Jan 22 '12 at 16:41
    
Actually it can be. As I said before, NSAutoreleasePool listens for Memory warnings, and drains if that happens. –  Richard J. Ross III Jan 22 '12 at 19:01
    
Where do you know that from? 99% of the time something like that happened, the app would crash... –  Fabian Kreiser Jan 22 '12 at 19:20
    
I've tested it via method swizzling, and after the pool drains, yes, the app usually does crash, unless you have an ungodly amount of objects in your autorelease pool. –  Richard J. Ross III Jan 22 '12 at 19:22

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