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I have to select a counted column, grouped by dates from two sources. I'm joining the resultset as a subquery. However, the result is bogus. As I see the problem is related to the JOIN .. ON clause. This query works fine:

SELECT id
FROM pu a 
LEFT JOIN (
    SELECT 
        COUNT(pd.id) AS c_id1, 
        NULL AS c_id2,
        LEFT(pd.start_date, 10) AS date,
        pd.pid 
    FROM 
        p_d pd
    **WHERE pd.pid = 111**
    GROUP BY date

    UNION 

    SELECT 
        NULL AS c_id1,
        COUNT(pd.id) AS c_id2,
        LEFT(pd.inactivation_date, 10) AS date, 
        pd.pid
    FROM 
        p_d pd
    **WHERE pd.pid = 111**
    GROUP BY date
) x
ON x.pid = a.id;

But this one (without the WHERE clause) returns a bad result set:

SELECT id
FROM pu a 
LEFT JOIN (
    SELECT 
        COUNT(pd.id) AS c_id1, 
        NULL AS c_id2,
        LEFT(pd.start_date, 10) AS date,
        pd.pid 
    FROM 
        p_d pd
    GROUP BY date

    UNION 

    SELECT 
        NULL AS c_id1,
        COUNT(pd.id) AS c_id2,
        LEFT(pd.inactivation_date, 10) AS date, 
        pd.pid
    FROM 
        p_d pd
    GROUP BY date
) x
ON x.pid = a.id;

It is possible to use a.id in the joined subquery somehow? It's "unknown column" now.

share|improve this question
    
What's wrong with the latter result? A bit hard to second guess the result you're expecting. –  Joachim Isaksson Jan 22 '12 at 15:57
    
Joachim, the second query returns only the first 3-4 rows (dates) with bogus numbers. The first one returns all of the rows (in this case, ~80) with proper counts. –  Eduard7 Jan 22 '12 at 16:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your subquery you are using columns like pd.pid for SELECT that are not part of the GROUP BY and are not aggregated. Such columns are called hidden and in standard SQL this would give syntax error, but mysql permits it, though it is free to choose value from any row in every group.

If you restrict your set with WHERE pd.pid = 111 all the values of pd.pid in the group will be the same so it doesn't matter which row will be used to get it, however without WHERE value of pd.pid will be undefined (mysql will probably choose the one that can fetch you fastest). You also use that undefined pid for the JOIN so you are bound to get wrong results.

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/group-by-hidden-columns.html

It's hard to say however how you should rewrite your query as you don't provide enough info about table schema, what are you trying to achieve and what is the meaning of your table/column names.

share|improve this answer
    
That answer enlightened me, my whole approach was bad. Just done with the query revamp, thank you. –  Eduard7 Jan 22 '12 at 19:04

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