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In C++ it is not allowed to assign an void* pointer to any integral pointer without an explicit cast. This requires the use of an static_cast.

But what is with this:

int* iptr = new int;

I know that new operator is defined as following:

void* operator new(size_t);

How does C++ handle this? I know that this is a basic question, but important. I also know that low-level code must use void. But how can this assignment be legal? iptr is a pointer to an int and new returns a pointer to void, which should trigger a message like "error: invalid conversion from ‘void*’ to ‘int*’ [-fpermissive]".

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Please read this: stackoverflow.com/questions/2697892/… ; operator new and new expressions are not the same thing. –  Mat Jan 22 '12 at 16:16
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Also, this one: stackoverflow.com/questions/2941888/… - I believe both of these answer your question. –  Mat Jan 22 '12 at 16:18
    
Also: thanks to you Mat! –  Peter Jan 22 '12 at 17:11
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1 Answer

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You have confused the new operator and the operator new function. No problem, everybody does. They are almost the same, except that they are different.

The function void* operator new(size_t) grabs a block of raw, untyped memory from whatever tree it grows on, and returns it to the program.

void* raw_memory = ::operator new(42);

It is an ordinary function with somewhat weird name.

The new operator is not a function and not a function call. It's a separate language construct. It takes raw memory (normally, one returned by the void* operator new(size_t) function) and turns it into an object by calling a constructor. It then returns a properly typed pointer to the newly-created object.

Fish* f = new Fish;

UPDATE Naturally, there is also the delete operator (the opposite of the new operator) and the void operator delete(void*) function (the opposite of the void* operator new(size_t) function).

There are also the new[] operator, the delete[] operator, the void* operator new[](size_t) function, and the void operator delete[](void*) function; they deal with arrays of objects (as opposed to individual objects).

There are also so-called "placement new" forms that do not call any of the operator new functions for fresh memory, but instead require an explicit pointer to raw memory. They have no corresponding built-in "delete" forms. You can roll your own if you are so inclined, but I refuse to talk about any of this while being sober.

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+1 for "They are almost the same, except that they are different." –  user142019 Jan 22 '12 at 16:26
    
Do you use delete on both? –  Seth Carnegie Jan 22 '12 at 16:33
    
@Seth: No, delete void_ptr; is undefined behaviour. You'd use ::operator delete(void_ptr_from_operator_new); –  Xeo Jan 22 '12 at 16:40
    
Naturally, there is the delete operator (the opposite of the new operator) and the void operator delete(void*) function (the opposite of the operator new function). There are also the new[] operator, the delete[] operator, the void* operator new[](size_t) function, and the void operator delete[](void*) function. There are also "placement new" forms that do not have corresponding "delete". –  n.m. Jan 22 '12 at 16:42
    
Thank you very much! Now it seem to be clear for me. Because even Debugging with gdb doesn't "show" me this. –  Peter Jan 22 '12 at 16:59
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