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I have just created my first git repository for some software my company writes. My intention is to be able to work on the software on multiple computers (office computer, home computer and laptop for when I'm working away).

The problem I am having is that my software is an extension for another piece of software and my code files are mixed in with the code files of the software we write for. As a result, I am unable to just add a directory to the repo that can then be pulled to each machine. To remedy this, I added each directory/file separately to the repo and then committed that. This worked great and my repo is working fine. The only problem is that when I pull the repo to another machine, instead of grabbing the files and adding them into the directory structure, it downloads all files and puts them inside a directory named after the repo. Is there anyway I can stop this so that the files are added to the existing directory structure?

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3 Answers 3

Try using the actual git program rather than the GitHub web interface, then you'll have a lot more flexibility, including cloning into a directory which has a different name than the source repo.

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Do you mean via the Terminal? That's what I have been doing. I ran git clone git@github.com:username/Repo-Name.git. Is that what you mean? –  user1067235 Jan 22 '12 at 17:03
    
Yes. You can then add another argument to the command which is the name of the directory to clone into. Try it and see. –  John Zwinck Jan 22 '12 at 17:06
    
This doesn't work if the directory isn't empty, which in my case it isn't. –  user1067235 Jan 22 '12 at 17:57
    
After playing about a little, the best (or maybe easiest for a beginner) was to clone the repo into repo name sub-directory and then move the .git file out of the sub-directory and merge the other files into my project. I can now push/pull for the repo to get the latest code –  user1067235 Jan 22 '12 at 17:57

If you've essentially just got a scattered collection of files that are added throughout the other project the only way it will work is if you make the root of your git repository the root of your other project. You're going to have lots of complaints about untracked files unless you make a very comprehensive .gitignore file to exclude all of the files from the project that you're building on top of. To make this actually work in practice you'll need to check out your git repo somewhere else, grab the .git directory and move it to the top level of the other project that you're adding to. Then cd into the other project and do git pull. This will, obviously, only work if the other project is not also using git. This is obviously NOT the optimal way to go about it.

If the other project IS using git, then the solution is to just clone their repo and add your files wherever you want... but I figure you wouldn't be asking this question if they were.

Another, probably better, option is to simply check all their files into your git repo and use a tool like Tailor to regularly ingest changes from their source control system into your git repo.

You should also check out Submodules, but from your description I don't think they'll actually solve your problem.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

In case any one reads this and wants to know the answer...

After playing about a little, the best (or maybe easiest for a beginner) was to clone the repo into repo name sub-directory and then move the .git file out of the sub-directory and merge the other files into my project. I can now push/pull for the repo to get the latest code

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