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I currently have an image that I want people's annotations to show up on, where the annotations actually have an x,y coordinate relative to the image, as well as a width and height. Let's say for now the annotations don't actually have text in them -- they'll just be empty boxes.

I'm wondering what the best way to display an empty box over the image would be, such that the user could click it. I know to raise the z-index of the annotation box, but I'm not sure where I would call the JQuery insert function, since the tag can only contain an image. Should I wrap the image in a and call Jquery insert annotation divs into the parent div of the image?

Thanks!

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1  
Hi Jasie, I'm curious: how do you let your users annotate the image? Can they just draw a rectangle on it? Or do they have to provide the coordinates. Could you show us some (javascript) code of that? –  hopla May 25 '09 at 15:52
2  
odyniec.net/projects/imgareaselect :) –  ash May 27 '09 at 22:00
    
Sweet, a nice jQuery plugin, just what I was looking for! –  hopla Jun 12 '09 at 9:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What about this

XHTML

<div class="img-container">
   <img src="image.jpg" alt="" />
</div>

CSS

.img-container {
    display: block;
    width: 300px;
    height: 300px;
    position: relative;
}

.img-container img {
    display: block;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
}

.img-container span {
    display: block;
    width: 50px;
    height: 30px;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
}

jQUERY

$(document).ready(function() {
    // calculate the annotation text here
    $('.img-container').append('<span>' + annotationText  + '</span>')

});

That should get rolling... :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks alex, that worked perfectly. May I ask why img-container has a position:relative; tag? –  ash May 22 '09 at 8:45
    
Sure you can Jasie! It has position: relative so any child elements with position: absolute are calculated from the parent. –  alex May 22 '09 at 9:06

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