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Dynamic Evaluations in a Key Listener

public class KeyUpper {
    Func<Key, bool> _evaluate;

    public void RegisterEvaluator(Func<Key, bool> evaluate){
        _evaluate = evaluate;
    }

    public void KeyUp(object sender, KeyEventArgs e){
        if (_evaluate(e.KeyCode))
            SomeResponse();
    }

    public void SomeResponse(){
        // ...
    }
}

This Lambda Should Await on Each Line

keyUpper.RegisterEvaluator(key => 
    {
    if (key == Key.A)
        if (key == Key.W)
            if (key == Key.A)
                return true;
    }
);
  • i.e. client code would provide a series of evaluations on the same key argument with the expectation that each line of evaluation would be awaited so that SomeResponse() would be invoked after a sequence of keyup events of 1:A 2:W 3:A
  • obviously at the moment that will never happen because the method is run until the end and key == Key.W will never be true
  • it may not be possible, but is there a way to make the method invocation automagically return from the next line if it evaluates to false but return to it until that line evaluates to true, following that through to the line after that, and to the line after that until the end of the method?
  • i.e. might there be a simple way to provide awaitable lambda expressions of this kind?
share|improve this question
1  
I'm not sure what is the question here, and how is this related to await. –  Kobi Jan 22 '12 at 17:17
    
the question is hard to explain, and strictly speaking it is not related to await or Tasks, although conceptually what im looking for is awaitable functionality –  Cel Jan 22 '12 at 17:20
2  
@cel - have you heard of reactive extensions? –  Daniel A. White Jan 22 '12 at 17:20
    
@DanielA.White I use RX a bit, but how would you subscribe with the order requirement - how could you generically specify W after A for instance? –  Cel Jan 22 '12 at 17:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If asynchronicity is not a requirement and you are fine with having one thread that almost always waits, you could do it by giving the lambda some blocking way to access the key. For example:

public void RegisterEvaluator(Func<Func<Key>, bool> evaluate);

…

keyUpper.RegisterEvaluator(
    getKey => getKey() == Key.A && getKey() == Key.W);

RegisterEvaluator would then spin up a new thread that calls the lambda in a loop, passing it a method that accesses the key, blocking if no key is available at the moment, for example using BlockingCollection<Key>.

If you think doing it this way is wasteful (it is), and you can use async-await, just make the lambda async and change the passed in method to one that is asynchronous too:

public Task RegisterEvaluator(Func<Func<Task<Key>>, Task<bool>> evaluate);

…

keyUpper.RegisterEvaluator(
    async getKey => await getKey() == Key.A && await getKey() == Key.W);

Implementation of the latter version (using BlockBuffer<Key>) could look like this:

class KeyUpper
{
    private readonly BufferBlock<Key> m_keyBuffer = new BufferBlock<Key>();

    public async Task RegisterEvaluator(
        Func<Func<Task<Key>>, Task<bool>> evaluate)
    {
        while (true)
        {
            if (await evaluate(m_keyBuffer.ReceiveAsync))
                SomeResponse();
        }
    }

    public void KeyUp(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
    {
        m_keyBuffer.Post(e.Key);
    }

    private void SomeResponse()
    {
        // whatever
    }
}

Now, I'm not sure how exactly do you want to handle matching the keys, but I think it's not like this. For example, this sample code would match the sequence of keys BAW, but not AAW.

Another option would be not using Func<Task<Key>>, but your custom awaitable that can be awaited multiple times and gives one key each time you do that:

public Task RegisterEvaluator(Func<KeyAwaitable, Task<bool>> evaluate);

…

keyUpper.RegisterEvaluator(
    async getKey => await getKey == Key.A && await getKey == Key.W);

But I think doing it this way is more confusing and harder to do.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for a fantastic answer! In the end I went with an Rx approach, however, as I think it may be a more powerful way to provide stream logic down the line - so the registration signature became void Register(Func<IObservable<Key>, IObservable<Key>>); and I have the possibility to supply advanced evaluations with operators like .Buffer(window open trigger, window close trigger etc) –  Cel Jan 24 '12 at 10:32

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