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I have a a cursor loop that's building a string by concatenating the contents of a table together, using code along these lines:

OPEN cur_t;
LOOP
    FETCH cur_t INTO v_texttoadd;

    v_string := v_string || v_texttoadd;
EXIT WHEN cur_t%notfound;
END LOOP;

The problem is, of course, that the last item gets added twice because the system runs through it once more before realising that there's nothing more to find.

I tried playing around with something like

OPEN cur_t;
WHILE cur_t%found;
LOOP
    FETCH cur_t INTO v_texttoadd;

    v_string := v_string || v_texttoadd;
END LOOP;

But that didn't seem to return anything at all.

What kind of syntax should I be using so that each row only appears in the resulting string once?

share|improve this question
up vote 18 down vote accepted

You can try this:

OPEN cur_t;
LOOP
  FETCH cur_t INTO v_texttoadd;
  EXIT WHEN cur_t%notfound;
  v_string := v_string || v_texttoadd;
END LOOP;

This works because %notfound is set when FETCH is executed and there aren't any more rows to fetch. In your example you checked %notfound after the concatenation and as a result, you had the duplicate in the end.

share|improve this answer

Right answers have already been given, but just elaborating a bit.

Simulating your current situation:

SQL> declare
  2    cursor cur_t
  3    is
  4    select ename
  5      from emp
  6     where deptno = 10
  7    ;
  8    v_texttoadd emp.ename%type;
  9    v_string    varchar2(100);
 10  begin
 11    open cur_t;
 12    loop
 13      fetch cur_t into v_texttoadd;
 14      v_string := v_string || v_texttoadd;
 15      exit when cur_t%notfound;
 16    end loop
 17    ;
 18    dbms_output.put_line(v_string);
 19  end;
 20  /
CLARKKINGMILLERMILLER

PL/SQL-procedure is geslaagd.

Here MILLER is printed twice. By just switching the EXIT statement and the v_string assignment, you get the desired result:

SQL> declare
  2    cursor cur_t
  3    is
  4    select ename
  5      from emp
  6     where deptno = 10
  7    ;
  8    v_texttoadd emp.ename%type;
  9    v_string    varchar2(100);
 10  begin
 11    open cur_t;
 12    loop
 13      fetch cur_t into v_texttoadd;
 14      exit when cur_t%notfound;
 15      v_string := v_string || v_texttoadd;
 16    end loop
 17    ;
 18    dbms_output.put_line(v_string);
 19  end;
 20  /
CLARKKINGMILLER

PL/SQL-procedure is geslaagd.

However, your PL/SQL code becomes easier when using a cursor-for-loop. You can then skip the v_texttoadd variable and the number of lines in your loop decreases:

SQL> declare
  2    cursor cur_t
  3    is
  4    select ename
  5      from emp
  6     where deptno = 10
  7    ;
  8    v_string    varchar2(100);
  9  begin
 10    for r in cur_t
 11    loop
 12      v_string := v_string || r.ename;
 13    end loop
 14    ;
 15    dbms_output.put_line(v_string);
 16  end;
 17  /
CLARKKINGMILLER

PL/SQL-procedure is geslaagd.

You can also use straight SQL to accomplish the job. An example with the SQL model clause, if you are on version 10g or higher:

SQL> select string
  2    from ( select string
  3                , rn
  4             from emp
  5            where deptno = 10
  6            model
  7                  dimension by (rownum rn)
  8                  measures (ename, cast(null as varchar2(100)) string)
  9                  ( string[any] order by rn desc = ename[cv()] || string[cv()+1]
 10                  )
 11         )
 12   where rn = 1
 13  /

STRING
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CLARKKINGMILLER

1 rij is geselecteerd.

Regards, Rob.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the FOR .. IN ... LOOP suggestion and examples. Cursor FOR loops are your friends ;-) Added bonus: you can often embed your cursor select statement in the FOR loop: FOR Rec IN (SELECT...) LOOP – DCookie May 22 '09 at 15:42

%notfound is set when fetch fails to retrieve a new row.

another possible way (this one avoiding the "if"s and "exit when"s):

OPEN cur_t;
FETCH cur_t INTO v_texttoadd;
WHILE cur_t%found LOOP
    v_string := v_string || v_texttoadd;
    FETCH cur_t INTO v_texttoadd;
END LOOP;
share|improve this answer

Simple answer, though possibly not the best:

OPEN cur_t;
LOOP
    FETCH cur_t INTO v_texttoadd;
    IF cur_t%found THEN
        v_string := v_string || v_texttoadd;
    END IF;
EXIT WHEN cur_t%notfound;
END LOOP;
share|improve this answer
    
I think, based on your indenting, you are assuming that the EXIT statement is part of the LOOP syntax and must come at the end of the loop. This isn't true; EXIT is just a statement like any other in the body of the loop. This is why, as others have shown, you can put it immediately after the FETCH to solve your issue. – Dave Costa May 22 '09 at 17:42

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