Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm learning MVVM in a course from Brian Lagunas in PluralSight.

At the beginning, he was writting this two interfaces:

public interface IView
{
    IViewModel ViewModel {get;set;}
}

public interface IViewModel
{
    IView View {get;set;}
}

I was learning in that mode, and then he removed ViewModel from IView.

public interface IView {}

But I can't see the difference of it, perhaps there's advantages and disadvantages of it. Is anything wrong if I put the first example?

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is of course to less context to leave any useful statements, but at first sight the interface

public interface IViewModel 
{
    IView View {get;set;}
}

seems very confusing for me because the main idea of the MVVM pattern is that the ViewModel is totally unaware of the View. If you equip the ViewModel with a reference to the View your are violating this idea.

share|improve this answer
1  
agree. this interface reminds me to the MVP pattern – Peter Porfy Jan 22 '12 at 18:24
    
So, you are purposing this context? public interface IView { IViewModel ViewModel {get;set;} } public interface IViewModel {} – Darf Zon Jan 22 '12 at 18:24
1  
"that the ViewModel is totally unaware of the View." - The totally is not always practical or strictly necessary. Things like closing Windows and showing popups becomes very hard if you follow the 'pure' path. – Henk Holterman Jan 22 '12 at 19:00
    
I don't particularly agree with this statement. MVVM is more of a name to seperate parts of your application. There are no know or strict rules how to apply mvvm by saying "the ViewModel is totally unaware of the View". Then I would raise the question why the view CAN have a reference to the viewmodel. That doesnt make sense cause all you do is databind, commanding, and Notifications of properties being changed. This ofcourse all happens, as we know, with the datacontext. – Rik van den Berg Jan 23 '12 at 9:01
1  
Rikkos, please correct me if i am wrong with that but for me the following holds: ViewModel == DataContext whereas "ViewModel" is the notion used in the pattern-context and "DataContext" is the notion used in the WPF/Silverlight-context where you implement the pattern. – marc wellman Jan 23 '12 at 12:10

According to this blog:

  • View-First: The View has a relationship to its ViewModel(usually through data binding).
  • ViewModel-First: The ViewModel creates the view (usually through an IoC container).

In both of these methods it presents a sticky-ness of the view to the view-model. Also, both of these imply a one-to-one relationship which while the common case, is not the always case.

share|improve this answer

Well, I haven't seen the pluralsight course, but I can talk generally about dependency management. In the original scheme, you have entity A that knows about entity B and B that knows about A. In this sense, there are two degrees of coupling: A depends on B and B depends on A. While they depend only on interfaces, which is a positive, that dependency still exists.

By removing one of those dependencies, you have a scenario where A depends on B, but B does not depend on, care about, or even know about A. In the original scenario, if you make changes to IView or IViewModel's API, these will be breaking changes. In the second scenario, you can make whatever changes you want to IViewModel and they will not affect the view implementations.

That's the advantage.

As for disadvantages, the only one is that you lose a convenience, but I consider that not really to be a disadvantage. In my book, anytime you can minimize coupling and dependencies (within reason), that's a win.

share|improve this answer

I think it's all about the idea to abstract the View through the ViewModel; the ViewModel exposes any property that must be presented to the View and the ones the View [user input in practice] can change (think to the two-way binding). It's the binding engine to take care through the PropertyChanged event to sync the UI with the ViewModel; in this way the ViewModel does not need to reference the View in use, it exposes to any view (you want to use) some properties...

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.