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This is the solution I came up with to pause/resume an active thread inside a console...

It requires a second thread for input, which the main loop reacts too. But my ignorance of C# makes me wonder if there is a simpler solution? Perhaps one that can be done with the main thread alone?

Essentially, I am testing several things that will iterate at the defined FPS, and I want to be able to pause and resume the iteration via keyboard input. Any feedback is appreciated.

class TestLoops
{
    int targetMainFPS = 5;
    int targetInputFPS = 3;
    bool CONTINUE = true;

    Thread testLoop, testLoop2;
    ConsoleKeyInfo cki;

    ManualResetEvent resetThread = new ManualResetEvent(true); //How to correctly pause threads in C#.
        public void Resume() { resetThread.Set(); }
        public void Pause() { resetThread.Reset(); }

    public TestLoops()
    {
        //_start = DateTime.Now.Ticks;
        Console.Write("CreatingLoop...");

        this.testLoop = new Thread(MainLoop);
        this.testLoop.Start();

        this.testLoop2 = new Thread(InputLoop);
        this.testLoop2.Start();
    }

    void MainLoop()
    {
        long _current = 0;
        long _last = 0;

        Console.Write("MainLoopStarted ");
        while(CONTINUE)
        {
            resetThread.WaitOne();

            _current = DateTime.Now.Ticks / 1000;
            if(_current > _last + (1000 / targetMainFPS) )
            {
                _last = _current;

                //Do something...
                Console.Write(".");

            }
            else
            {
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(10);
            }
        }
    }

    void InputLoop()
    {
        long _current = 0;
        long _last = 0;

        Console.Write("InputLoopStarted ");
        while(CONTINUE)
        {
            _current = DateTime.Now.Ticks / 1000;
            if(_current > _last + (1000 / targetInputFPS))
            {
                _last = _current;

                //Manage keyboard Input
                this.cki = Console.ReadKey(true);
                //Console.Write(":");
                if(this.cki.Key == ConsoleKey.Q)
                {
                    //MessageBox.Show("'Q' was pressed.");
                    CONTINUE = false;
                }

                if(this.cki.Key == ConsoleKey.P)
                {
                    this.Pause();
                }
                if(this.cki.Key == ConsoleKey.R)
                {
                    this.Resume();
                }
            }
            else
            {
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(10);
            }
        }
    }

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        TestLoops test = new TestLoops();
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
Frame rate is usually not maintained by pausing for arbitrary values (like 10ms that you chose). What are you actually trying to accomplish, regardless of the pause/resume functionality? –  Groo Jan 22 '12 at 18:15
    
Nothing more then repeating something till I am satisfied with what I see (in this case repeated dice mechanic results). It is mostly just for testing. However, I am trying to learn as I go and if there is a more appropriate way of doing this I would like to learn. –  RogueDeus Jan 22 '12 at 18:27
    
Google "c# game loop". –  Hans Passant Jan 22 '12 at 18:34
    
Curious... Why remove the C# from my title? :/ –  RogueDeus Jan 23 '12 at 2:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can simplify it drastically by using the non-blocking Console.KeyAvailable check. That way, you can execute all your code from the main thread:

using System;
using System.Threading;

class TestLoops
{
    const int targetFPS = 5;

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        bool _continue = true;
        DateTime _last = DateTime.MinValue;

        while (_continue)
        {
            if (Console.KeyAvailable)
            {
                ConsoleKeyInfo cki = Console.ReadKey(true);

                if (cki.Key == ConsoleKey.Q)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("\n'Q' was pressed.");
                    _continue = false;
                }

                if (cki.Key == ConsoleKey.P)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("\n'P' was pressed; press 'R' to resume.");

                    // Block until 'R' is pressed.
                    while (Console.ReadKey(true).Key != ConsoleKey.R)
                        ; // Do nothing.

                    Console.WriteLine("'R' was pressed.");
                }
            }

            DateTime _current = DateTime.Now;
            if (_current - _last > TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(1000F / targetFPS))
            {
                _last = _current;

                // Do something...
                Console.Write(".");
            }
            else
            {
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(10);
            }
        }        
    }
}

Edit: Replying to comment.

Be careful. The code below blocks due to the Console.ReadKey call, not due to the while loop. The while loop is there only so that, if the user enters a character other than R, the program would discard it and wait for another character to be entered.

// Block until 'R' is pressed.
while (Console.ReadKey(true).Key != ConsoleKey.R)
    ; // Do nothing.

If you wanted to block until any character is pressed, you would simply use:

Console.ReadKey(true);
share|improve this answer
    
That second line should probably say: 'R' was pressed; press 'P' to pause again? –  Groo Jan 22 '12 at 18:29
    
Thanks, corrected. –  Douglas Jan 22 '12 at 18:33
    
Thanks, that would do it. I am curious though. While blocked, is the thread essentially paused waiting for another ConsoleKey input? Which means that the ManualResetEvent is nothing more then a wrapped version of that type of block? –  RogueDeus Jan 22 '12 at 18:57
    
Just noticed the simplification of the DateTime... Thanks! That also helps a lot. –  RogueDeus Jan 22 '12 at 19:00
1  
In a way, yes. There are several blocking mechanisms: Thread.Sleep waits for a time to elapse, Console.ReadKey waits for keyboard input, and ManualResetEvent.WaitOne waits for a signal (typically issued from the user code itself). Blocking on a Console.ReadKey call is functionally equivalent to waiting on a ManualResetEvent which will be signalled (by another thread) when keyboard input is available. –  Douglas Jan 22 '12 at 19:06

This will work, yes. The only thing that you could consider is making sure that the worker thread stops even if it was previously suspended, when you press the Q key:

if(this.cki.Key == ConsoleKey.Q)
{
     CONTINUE = false;
     this.Resume(); // <-- make sure that the worker thread resumes
}

As a side note, constant FPS is usually maintained by skipping frames as appropriate, rather than pausing a thread. Pausing a thread is imprecise, and doesn't allow fine tuning animation speeds. Thread.Sleep can also behave differently on different hardware, and can have rather poor resolutions (a minimum OS timeslice is around ~16ms IIRC).

share|improve this answer
    
I am not familiar with skipping frames. :/ Something new for me to learn if I ever get to putting something on the screen. As for now I am using Unity to render, and I am using the console to test math and object ideas absent an actual game space. –  RogueDeus Jan 22 '12 at 19:06

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