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Can somebody tell me why this is possible? An private attribute should only be changable from the class itself. s::$c is readable (getC()) but why I can write to it?

<?php

class s{

    private $c;

    public function __construct() {
        $this->c = new t;
    }

    public function getC() {
        return $this->c;
    }

}

class t {

    public $a = 1;
    public $b = 2;

}

$x = new s();

$x->getC()->a = 5;

echo $x->getC()->a;
?>

Output: 5

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

when php returns an object it doesn't duplicate it, it returns a pointer (reference) to the object in the memory. therefore every change you make will affect the original object.

in order to prevent it you can clone the object before returning it

public function getC() {
    return clone $this->c;
}
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OK this makes sense... But if I return an array, it's always a copy, isn't it? –  phil-opp Jan 22 '12 at 22:32
    
yes, this is the way php works (unlike languages like java for example where all the type except the basic ones [int, char, byte etc...] are passed by reference), in php only objects pass by reference. if you want an array to pass by reference add & before the name of the var, i.e function changeArray(&$array){...} –  Yaron U. Jan 23 '12 at 8:31

You've exposed $c by making the getC() method public. Now anything/anyone can access $c through the use of the getC() function, and anyone could have always accessed $a, since it was public in the first place.


If you want the values $a and $b of class t to be read-only, then you can make them private, each with an accessor method like getA() and getB(). For example:

class s {
    private $c;

    public function __construct() {
        $this->c = new t;
    }

    public function getC() {
        return $this->c;
    }
}

class t {
    private $a = 1;
    private $b = 2;

    public function getA() {
        return $this->a;
    }

    public function getB() {
        return $this->b;
    }
}
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This is expected behavior.

"Private" means you can't use $x->c directly. $x->getC() is a function of s, and as such can access private members of s. getC is public so you can call that method anywhere.

In short, because you exposed getC(a "getter" for C), you can read the value of C anywhere. What you can't do is $x->getC() = 2;.

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