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I made a template for my class to emulate the basics functions of the stack and I'm getting an error and i don't know how to fix it.

My code:

#using <mscorlib.dll>
using namespace System;
using namespace System::IO;

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

template<class T> 
class stack
{
    vector<T> *v;
    int n;
public:
    stack(int,vector<T>*);
    ~stack();

    void push(T);
    void pop();

    void afis();
};

template<class T> 
stack<T>::stack(int x, vector<T> *y)
{
    x = n;
    y = v;
}

template<class T> 
stack<T>::~stack()
{
}

template<class T> 
void stack<T>::push(T item)
{
    v->push_back(item);
}

template<class T> 
void stack<T>::pop()
{
    v->pop_back();
}

template<class T> 
void stack<T>::afis()
{
    typedef vector<T>::iterator it;
    for(it i = v->begin(); i != v->end(); ++i)
        cout << *i << " ";
}

int main()
{
    int n, nr;
    cin >> n;

    vector<int> v;
    for(int i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        cin >> nr;
        v.push_back(nr);
    }

    stack<int> st(n, &v);

    st.pop();
    st.afis();
}

And the error is at runtime and it says it accessing memory that it shouldn't. Also I am wondering if i can declare my stack thru a pointer something like stack *st = new stack(n, &v). Is that posible?

share|improve this question
    
It is not Standard C++. It is CLI/C++ which is Microsoft's language, specifically designed for CLR. –  Nawaz Jan 22 '12 at 19:47
    
@Nawaz ignore the first line. it doesn't have anything to do with the code –  Dementor Jan 22 '12 at 19:48
    
Your constructor seems backwards... Should be v=y and n=x and not as it's written... –  spatz Jan 22 '12 at 19:49
1  
Run it in the debugger and find out where the invalid memory is accessed... –  sth Jan 22 '12 at 19:52
1  
I see someone solved at least one of your problems, just wanted to remind you in case it's not done just out of interest; there is a built in stack implementation, just #include <stack> –  Joachim Isaksson Jan 22 '12 at 19:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your constructor is all backwards:

template<class T> 
stack<T>::stack(int x, vector<T> *y)
{
    n = x;
    v = y;
}
share|improve this answer
    
how silly of me ^^ thx! and the other problem? declaring stack<int> *st = new stack(n, &v)? –  Dementor Jan 22 '12 at 19:50
    
@Dementor: Sure why not. I don't see a problem with that. However, passing an automatic variable (i.e. your vector) to a dynamic object is at best dangerous. –  bitmask Jan 22 '12 at 19:51

Your assignments are backwards here.

template<class T> 
stack<T>::stack(int x, vector<T> *y)
{
    x = n;
    y = v;
}

n and v never get assigned to anything. Their values are undefined.

You can be alerted of these mistakes at compile time by using initialization lists.

template<class T> 
stack<T>::stack(int x, vector<T> *y)
    : n(x), v(y)
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
And can you explain me how " : n(x), v(y)" works? –  Dementor Jan 22 '12 at 19:54
2  
@Dementor, see here. –  spatz Jan 22 '12 at 19:56
    
It is the recommended syntax for initializing member variables of a class, assigning x to n, and v to y. –  Drew Dormann Jan 22 '12 at 19:56

You're assignment statements in the constructor are backwards.

share|improve this answer

Just for example, lets say we have class like this (difference between this class and yours is that I deleted n variable and I don't have pointer on vector v)

template<class T> 
class stack
{
    vector<T> v;
public:
    stack(int,vector<T>*);
    ~stack();

    void push(T);
    void pop();

    void afis();
};

If you try without pointer on variable v then you must use constructor initialization list as bitmask told you. If you don't write constructor initialization list, then you will get compile error. This is because vector class has it own constructor which must be executed before body of stack class constructor, and only place is constructor initialization list. So it would be like:

   template<class T> 
stack<T>::stack():v(0)
{
}

which means you created vector with 0 elements.

I think that your class wouldn't works so well if you try use it in some other function than main, but never mind that!

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