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I've written two functions, which should start a TCP-Server/Client. If I call them with the IP "127.0.0.1" (just for testing), then everything works fine. But if I call them with the public IP of my computer, I get a connection timeout. Has anybody an idea what could be the problem?

Here the Code:

Server:

bool fSTARTED = false;
struct timeval tv;

TCP_StartServer (const int iPort, SOCKET *iSOCKET)
{
WSADATA wsa;
SOCKET iSOCKETListen;
SOCKADDR_IN tAdr;

if(!fSTARTED)
{
    if(WSAStartup(MAKEWORD(2,2), &wsa))
    {
        *iSOCKET = -1;
        return;
    }
    tv.tv_sec = 5;
    tv.tv_usec = 0;
    fSTARTED = true;
}

iSOCKETListen = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);

memset(&tAdr, 0, sizeof(SOCKADDR_IN));
tAdr.sin_family = AF_INET;
tAdr.sin_port = htons(iPort);
tAdr.sin_addr.s_addr = htonl(INADDR_ANY);
if(bind(iSOCKETListen, (SOCKADDR*) & tAdr, sizeof(SOCKADDR_IN)) == SOCKET_ERROR)
{
    *iSOCKET = 0 - WSAGetLastError();
    return;
}

if(listen(iSOCKETListen, SOMAXCONN) == SOCKET_ERROR)
{
    *iSOCKET =  0 - WSAGetLastError();
    return;
}

*iSOCKET = accept(iSOCKETListen, NULL, NULL);
if(*iSOCKET == INVALID_SOCKET)
{
    *iSOCKET = 0 - WSAGetLastError();
    return;
}

return;
}

Client:

TCP_StartClient (char *sIP, const int iPort, SOCKET *iSOCKET)
{
WSADATA wsa;
SOCKADDR_IN tAdr;

if(!fSTARTED)
{
    if(WSAStartup(MAKEWORD(2,2), &wsa))
    {
        *iSOCKET = -2;
        return;
    }
    tv.tv_sec = 5;
    tv.tv_usec = 0;
    fSTARTED = true;

}

*iSOCKET = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
if(*iSOCKET == INVALID_SOCKET)
{
    *iSOCKET = 0 - WSAGetLastError();
    return;
}

memset(&tAdr, 0, sizeof(SOCKADDR_IN));
tAdr.sin_family = AF_INET;
tAdr.sin_port = htons(iPort);
tAdr.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr(sIP);

if(connect(*iSOCKET, (SOCKADDR*) &tAdr, sizeof(SOCKADDR)) == SOCKET_ERROR)
{
    *iSOCKET =  0 - WSAGetLastError();
    return;
}

return;
}
share|improve this question
    
what is the value of sIP arg in StartClient in case of timeout? –  Victor Sorokin Jan 22 '12 at 19:52
1  
Have you opened the corresponding port? –  Gandaro Jan 22 '12 at 19:52
    
depending on the OS (Windows 2008, Windows 7 etc.) you could have a firewall configured which prevents this... –  Yahia Jan 22 '12 at 19:53
    
@Yahia I guess it's Windows, because of WSADATA. –  Victor Sorokin Jan 22 '12 at 19:56
    
@VictorSorokin I agree, but that doesn't tell us the Windows version and not all Windows version come with a built-in firewall... –  Yahia Jan 22 '12 at 19:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's how a typical home computer network looks (simplified diagram and explanation):

        \     Internet     /
         \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
                  |
                  | 212.60.44.90 (public IP address)
           +-------------+
           | DSL router  |
           +-------------+
                  | 10.0.0.1 (private network router)
                  |
                  | 10.0.0.2 (private network address)
           +-------------+
           |Your computer|
           +-------------+

In this case the router is doing NAT from your local 10.0.0.x addresses to your public 212.60.44.90 address. Your computer is unaware of the public IP address that it ends up using, because that information is only in the DSL router. The point of NAT is that there may also be other computers on your local 10.0.0.x network, and they share the same public IP address (because there is only one).

Your router probably also acts as a firewall, preventing random incoming connections from the Internet from reaching your local computers. Normally the router will block all such incoming connections.

Given the above, you should be able to see why you cannot connect to your public 212.60.44.90 address from within your own network. Your computer sends the request to the router, which either ignores or blocks your request from a firewall perspective.

Depending on your router, you may be able to configure it to forward incoming requests to your public IP address to a specific computer on your 10.0.0.x network. You would have to set up this manually, and instructions about how to do that are beyond the scope of this answer.

Also, you may notice that you should be able to connect to your local computer on your local network address (10.0.0.2 in the diagram). However, that's not much more interesting than connecting to 127.0.0.1.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 also, most NAT routers will not forward requests when coming from the inside. I for instance can't connect to my server via the public IP when on the inside, I have to use the private IP. Makes it awfully hard to quickly test if I have set it up properly, always have to test from another connection. –  r_ahlskog Jan 24 '12 at 8:07
    
Thank you for this really detailed answer. I think I understand it now. So I would need to try it with a Computer outside of my Network... –  Shadowigor Jan 24 '12 at 17:54

This might not even be a problem with your code. Some computers (like mine) can't see itself when trying to access from the external IP. Try setting a loopback adapter for your external IP, also, check your NAT rules.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, that could be. I'll try it with loopback adapter. I hope it works with it. –  Shadowigor Jan 22 '12 at 20:07
    
So... what happened? –  WoLfulus Jan 23 '12 at 0:11
    
I tried to install the loopback adapter, but it doesn't work. It couldn't install the drivers. But I tested it now with another computer and it also didn't work. So it must be something else. –  Shadowigor Jan 23 '12 at 18:41

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