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Consider a tee export of a MySQL query.

SELECT * FROM mytable;
+----------+-------+----------+-----------+-------+------+--------+
| label1   | lbl2  | label3   | label4    | lbl5  | lbl6 | label7 |
+----------+-------+----------+-----------+-------+------+--------+
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001596 |  0.161152 |     2 |    1 | a      |
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001404 |  0.162774 |     3 |    1 | a      |
     *
     *
     *
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001286 | 10.941642 |  5999 |    1 | a      |
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001315 | 10.942950 |  6000 |    1 | a      |
+----------+-------+----------+-----------+-------+------+--------+
9995 rows in set (0.04 sec)

I would like to process this mysqlqtee.txt file through sed or perl, filtering the actual data rows only.

I can tell sed or perl to: "Comment out every line starting with the static text of '| AB', please!"

sed -i '.old' 's/\(^\| AB.*\)/#\1/g' mysqlqtee.txt
perl -pi.old -e 's/(^\| AB.*)/#$1/g' mysqlqtee.txt

These get me:

SELECT * FROM mytable ORDER BY timecode;
+----------+-------+----------+-----------+-------+------+--------+
| label1   | lbl2  | label3   | label4    | lbl5  | lbl6 | label7 |
+----------+-------+----------+-----------+-------+------+--------+
#| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001596 |  0.161152 |     2 |    1 | a      |
#| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001404 |  0.162774 |     3 |    1 | a      |
     *
     *
     *
#| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001286 | 10.941642 |  5999 |    1 | a      |
#| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001315 | 10.942950 |  6000 |    1 | a      |
+----------+-------+----------+-----------+-------+------+--------+
9995 rows in set (0.04 sec)

nicely commenting out all the actual data rows and leave every other line untouched.

What I am so far unable to tell perl or sed is to: "Comment out every line starting with anything OTHER THAN the static text of '| AB', please!" Which would get me:

#SELECT * FROM mytable ORDER BY timecode;
#+----------+-------+----------+-----------+-------+------+--------+
#| label1   | lbl2  | label3   | label4    | lbl5  | lbl6 | label7 |
#+----------+-------+----------+-----------+-------+------+--------+
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001596 |  0.161152 |     2 |    1 | a      |
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001404 |  0.162774 |     3 |    1 | a      |
     *
     *
     *
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001286 | 10.941642 |  5999 |    1 | a      |
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001315 | 10.942950 |  6000 |    1 | a      |
#+----------+-------+----------+-----------+-------+------+--------+
#9995 rows in set (0.04 sec)

I don't seem to be able to translate the "IT DOESN'T START WITH" part to regexp. The dual use of ^ meaning NOT and LINE_START at the same time causes trouble. I can negate the starting letter with s/^[^\|]/, but that also leaves the header row out.

I managed to do this in perl, using an IF statement. But it still disturbs me way too much that I couldn't do it with a single s///g. Can this be done that way?

How do I translate the "IT DOESN'T START WITH" part to regexp? Either sed or perl solution is fine!

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1  
Is this one useful? superuser.com/questions/244723/exclude-some-matches-with-sed –  The Nail Jan 22 '12 at 20:10
    
Yes, it is useful, because it enables me to exclude the header row. But it does not answer the question that's been bugging me. –  Keve Jan 22 '12 at 20:19
    
Why use a mysql client and grep its output, when you can just connect to the DB directly using the real API? And, why not tailor your query: SELECT * from mytable where label1 NOT REGEX '^AB'? –  Ether Jan 22 '12 at 22:02
    
I think it's a mistake to base the negated regexp on data that might change i.e. data under label1 will not always not AB... if it is then it's wasted in a database. Better to concentrate on removing headers and footers i.e. anything that's doesn't begin with | or begins with | label1 –  potong Jan 22 '12 at 22:20
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can negate a regex with sed by putting ! after it like so:

sed -i.old '/^| AB/!s/^/#/' mysqltree.txt

Output

$ sed '/^| AB/!s/^/#/' mysqltree.txt
#SELECT * FROM mytable;
#+----------+-------+----------+-----------+-------+------+--------+
#| label1   | lbl2  | label3   | label4    | lbl5  | lbl6 | label7 |
#+----------+-------+----------+-----------+-------+------+--------+
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001596 |  0.161152 |     2 |    1 | a      |
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001404 |  0.162774 |     3 |    1 | a      |
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001286 | 10.941642 |  5999 |    1 | a      |
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001315 | 10.942950 |  6000 |    1 | a      |
#+----------+-------+----------+-----------+-------+------+--------+
#9995 rows in set (0.04 sec)
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent. This use of the negation has eluded me until now. –  Keve Jan 22 '12 at 20:51
    
I believe this is what I should have done when I was trying to negate the "| AB" inside the regex of the s//, like s/!(^\| AB)/. But it didn't work. :-) –  Keve Jan 22 '12 at 20:58
    
\| with sed is alternation. If you want a literal | you don't escape it. –  SiegeX Jan 22 '12 at 21:20
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This task is made easy if you use a lookahead. Instead of using a capture group, just assert that the text is, or is not what you seek.

Comment the lines:

perl -pi.old -e's/^(?=\| AB)/#/' mysqlqtee.txt

Comment all the other lines:

perl -pi.old -e's/^(?!\| AB)/#/' mysqlqtee.txt
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@TheNail The Nail's comment showed this, but in a slightly different environment and I did not see at the time that it can also be used the way you just demonstrated. Thank you! –  Keve Jan 22 '12 at 21:30
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There is no negation in regexps, but you have all the power of the whole programming language, so use it:

perl -pi.old -e '/(^\| AB.*)/ or $_ = "#$_"' mysqlqtee.txt
share|improve this answer
    
Simple, short, elegant, works! I am still figuring out how it translates to English. The regex part says "match all lines starting with '| AB'. If I understand correctly, the or has the effect of the English "otherwise", so the rest means "otherwise make the current line begin with a hash-mark". Correct me if I am wrong, please! In this case, it is a very interesting approach I wouldn't have considered. –  Keve Jan 22 '12 at 20:38
    
correction, there is no negation in perl's regex, sed can negate just fine –  SiegeX Jan 22 '12 at 20:46
    
I stand corrected. –  Keve Jan 22 '12 at 21:02
    
@Alan, I cannot mark more than one answer as accepted. Too bad, because yours deserve it. –  Keve Jan 22 '12 at 21:20
1  
@SiegeX nonsense. The negation isn't in the regex, but in the sed language, just as with perl. –  hobbs Jan 22 '12 at 21:32
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Will this work for you -

sed -i.bak '/^+--/,/^+--/s/^/#/;1s/^/#/' file
           |____________|     |___| 
                 |              |
          This defines a    This identifies
          regex range.       the first line
  • For our simple substitution we provide two markers. First is a regex range. This range suggests that start from a line which starts with +-- and continue till you find another line like that. For all those lines put a # in front of it. As a result, the lines after your SQL query until the beginning of data gets # in front of them. Also, since the regex range starts at the very end of file, it starts marking #. Since there is no end range encountered there it will mark until the end of file
  • The second marker is a line number. Since we want to put # in front of your SQL statement, we tell sed that look at the first line and what ever that may be, put a # in front of it.

InputFile:

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat file
SELECT * FROM mytable;
+----------+-------+----------+-----------+-------+------+--------+
| label1   | lbl2  | label3   | label4    | lbl5  | lbl6 | label7 |
+----------+-------+----------+-----------+-------+------+--------+
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001596 |  0.161152 |     2 |    1 | a      |
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001404 |  0.162774 |     3 |    1 | a      |
     *
     *
     *
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001286 | 10.941642 |  5999 |    1 | a      |
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001315 | 10.942950 |  6000 |    1 | a      |
+----------+-------+----------+-----------+-------+------+--------+
9995 rows in set (0.04 sec)

Test: You can use the -i option to backup the original file or redirect the following output to another file.

[jaypal:~/Temp] sed '/^+--/,/^+--/s/^/#/;1s/^/#/' file
#SELECT * FROM mytable;
#+----------+-------+----------+-----------+-------+------+--------+
#| label1   | lbl2  | label3   | label4    | lbl5  | lbl6 | label7 |
#+----------+-------+----------+-----------+-------+------+--------+
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001596 |  0.161152 |     2 |    1 | a      |
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001404 |  0.162774 |     3 |    1 | a      |
     *
     *
     *
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001286 | 10.941642 |  5999 |    1 | a      |
| ABCDEFGH | YNNYY | 0.001315 | 10.942950 |  6000 |    1 | a      |
#+----------+-------+----------+-----------+-------+------+--------+
#9995 rows in set (0.04 sec)
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it works exactly as I need. But I have no idea how it does its job! :-) –  Keve Jan 22 '12 at 20:55
1  
Added the explanation @Keve :) –  jaypal Jan 22 '12 at 21:00
    
Bombastic. Thanks for the explanation! Now it all makes sense. I just have one more question: You guys who come up with these, what do you eat? :-) –  Keve Jan 22 '12 at 21:07
    
@Keve Fruit loops :P –  jaypal Jan 22 '12 at 21:12
    
Well, whatever it is you eat, it works magic on the human brain. The generic food I eat (apple, banana, chicken, pork, potato, rice) doesn't have that effect on me. :-) –  Keve Jan 22 '12 at 21:16
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To match the character '|', use \| (a character class [|] would also work); to match any character except '|', use a negated character class [^|].

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