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How can i partition rows in SQL Server by date?

Bonus Chatter

In SQL Server it's relatively easy to partition tables by year, e.g.:

  • table Orders_2000
  • table Orders_2001
  • table Orders_2002
  • ...
  • table Orders_2011
  • table Orders_2012

You create a separate table for each year, making sure to include a Year column with a check constraint that matches the table:

CREATE TABLE Transactions_1999 (Year int NOT NULL DEFAULT 1999, TransactionID int NOT NULL, CustomerName varchar(50))
    ALTER TABLE Transactions_1999 ADD CONSTRAINT PK_Transactions1999 PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (Year, TransactionID)
    ALTER TABLE Transactions_1999 ADD CONSTRAINT CK_Transactions1999_Year CHECK (Year = '1999')

CREATE TABLE Transactions_2000 (Year int NOT NULL DEFAULT 2000, TransactionID int NOT NULL, CustomerName varchar(50))
    ALTER TABLE Transactions_2000 ADD CONSTRAINT PK_Transactions2000 PRIMARY KEY (Year, TransactionID)
    ALTER TABLE Transactions_2000 ADD CONSTRAINT CK_Transactions2000_Year CHECK (Year = '2000')

CREATE TABLE Transactions_2001 (Year int NOT NULL DEFAULT 2001, TransactionID int NOT NULL, CustomerName varchar(50))
    ALTER TABLE Transactions_2001 ADD CONSTRAINT PK_Transactions2001 PRIMARY KEY (Year, TransactionID)
    ALTER TABLE Transactions_2001 ADD CONSTRAINT CK_Transactions2001_Year CHECK (Year = '2001')
...
CREATE TABLE Transactions_2011 (year int NOT NULL DEFAULT 2011, TransactionID int NOT NULL, CustomerName varchar(50))
    ALTER TABLE Transactions_2011 ADD CONSTRAINT PK_Transactions2011 PRIMARY KEY (Year, TransactionID)
    ALTER TABLE Transactions_2011 ADD CONSTRAINT CK_Transactions2011_Year CHECK (Year = '2011')

CREATE TABLE Transactions_2012 (Year int NOT NULL DEFAULT 2012, TransactionID int NOT NULL, CustomerName varchar(50))
    ALTER TABLE Transactions_2012 ADD CONSTRAINT PK_Transactions2012 PRIMARY KEY (Year, TransactionID)
    ALTER TABLE Transactions_2012 ADD CONSTRAINT CK_Transactions2012_Year CHECK (Year = '2012')

Then you can construct a VIEW that merges to tables together:

CREATE VIEW Transactions AS
SELECT * FROM Transactions_1999
UNION ALL
SELECT * FROM Transactions_2000
UNION ALL
SELECT * FROM Transactions_2001
UNION ALL
--...
SELECT * FROM Transactions_2011
UNION ALL
SELECT * FROM Transactions_2012

And now you can query this Transactions view:

SELECT * FROM Transactions
WHERE (CustomerName LIKE 'boyd%')
OR (CustomerName LIKE '% boyd%')

And data can be inserted into the view, and SQL Server will automatically put it in the table it's supposed to go in:

INSERT INTO Transactions(Year, TransactionID, CustomerName)
VALUES (2012, 378922384, 'Ian Boyd')

But that's not what i want

i want to partitions data into tables by age. Rows with a TransactionDate older than 90 days should go into one table, and transactions with a TransactionDate newer than 90 days go into another table:

  • table Transactions_olderThan90Days
  • table Transactions_newerThan90Days

So says the SQL:

CREATE TABLE Transactions_NewerThan90Days (
    TransactionDate datetime NOT NULL,
    TransactionID int NOT NULL,
    CustomeName varchar(50))


CREATE TABLE Transactions_OlderThan90Days (
    TransactionDate datetime NOT NULL,
    TransactionID int NOT NULL,
    CustomeName varchar(50))

Is such a thing possible in SQL Server?

i realize this sounds impossible, since it means SQL Server having to move data constantly.

share|improve this question
    
Unless you absolutely need that no transaction older than 90 days is in the first table at ANY time I would just settle for a scheduled job that moves all "old" transactions to a different table. –  Paolo Falabella Jan 22 '12 at 20:45
    
This isn't possible. You haven't explained what you would hope to gain if it were though. –  Martin Smith Jan 22 '12 at 20:59
    
@MartinSmith In my real database i would have table Transactions, table Transactions_olderThan90Days, and the view would be AllTransactions. Spontaneously software will only have to deal with 3 months of data, and i can get rid of an entire, complicated, archiving process. –  Ian Boyd Jan 22 '12 at 21:00
    
and are you using SQL 2000 or SQL 2008? Table partitioning is different than partitioned views. –  Stuart Ainsworth Jan 22 '12 at 21:01
1  
Whould you like this moved to data.se? –  Sam Saffron Jan 23 '12 at 3:56
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