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In the following t-sql statement, how many times will the dbo.FUNC function get called?

SELECT
    column1,
    column2,
    dbo.FUNC(column3) AS column3
FROM table1
WHERE dbo.FUNC(column3) >= 5
ORDER BY dbo.FUNC(column3) DESC

Will it called multiple separate times per row, or does the optimizer recognize that it is being used multiple times in a single statement, and only call it once?

How can I test this? I can't insert into a table inside of a function, so incrementing a counter wont work...

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This isn't guaranteed.

You would need to check the execution plan to find out. Some examples.

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.FUNC1(@p1 int)
RETURNS int
AS
BEGIN
    RETURN @p1 + 1
END

GO

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.FUNC2(@p1 int)
RETURNS int
WITH SCHEMABINDING
AS
BEGIN
    RETURN @p1 + 1
END

GO
SELECT 
       OBJECTPROPERTYEX(OBJECT_ID('dbo.FUNC1'), 'IsDeterministic'),
       OBJECTPROPERTYEX(OBJECT_ID('dbo.FUNC2'), 'IsDeterministic') 
GO

FUNC2 is created WITH SCHEMABINDING and is treated as deterministic. FUNC1 isn't.

SELECT
    dbo.FUNC1(number) AS FUNC1,
    dbo.FUNC2(number) AS FUNC2
FROM master..spt_values
WHERE dbo.FUNC1(number) >= 5 AND dbo.FUNC2(number) >= 5
ORDER BY dbo.FUNC1(number), dbo.FUNC2(number)

Gives Plan

PLAN1

  |--Sort(ORDER BY:([Expr1003] ASC, [Expr1004] ASC))
       |--Compute Scalar(DEFINE:([Expr1003]=[test].[dbo].[FUNC1]([master].[dbo].[spt_values].[number])))
            |--Filter(WHERE:([test].[dbo].[FUNC1]([master].[dbo].[spt_values].[number])>=(5) AND [Expr1004]>=(5)))
                 |--Compute Scalar(DEFINE:([Expr1004]=[test].[dbo].[FUNC2]([master].[dbo].[spt_values].[number])))
                      |--Index Scan(OBJECT:([master].[dbo].[spt_values].[ix2_spt_values_nu_nc]))

FUNC1 is evaluated twice (once in the filter and once in a compute scalar outputting a calculated column used for both the projection and the ordering), FUNC2 is only evaluated once.

Rewriting as

SELECT
    FUNC1,
    FUNC2
FROM master..spt_values
CROSS APPLY (SELECT dbo.FUNC1(number), dbo.FUNC2(number)) C(FUNC1, FUNC2)
WHERE FUNC1 >= 5 AND FUNC2 >= 5
ORDER BY FUNC1, FUNC2

Changes the plan slightly and both are only evaluated once

Plan 2

  |--Sort(ORDER BY:([Expr1003] ASC, [Expr1004] ASC))
       |--Filter(WHERE:([Expr1003]>=(5)))
            |--Compute Scalar(DEFINE:([Expr1003]=[test].[dbo].[FUNC1]([master].[dbo].[spt_values].[number])))
                 |--Filter(WHERE:([Expr1004]>=(5)))
                      |--Compute Scalar(DEFINE:([Expr1004]=[test].[dbo].[FUNC2]([master].[dbo].[spt_values].[number])))
                           |--Index Scan(OBJECT:([master].[dbo].[spt_values].[ix2_spt_values_nu_nc]))

Now making a slight alteration to the query

SELECT
    FUNC1 + 10,
    FUNC2 + 10
FROM master..spt_values
CROSS APPLY (SELECT dbo.FUNC1(number), dbo.FUNC2(number)) C(FUNC1, FUNC2)
WHERE FUNC1 >= 5 AND FUNC2 >= 5
ORDER BY FUNC1, FUNC2

Gives the opposite of the original result in that FUNC2 is evaluated twice but FUNC1 only once.

Plan 3

  |--Compute Scalar(DEFINE:([Expr1005]=[Expr1003]+(10)))
       |--Sort(ORDER BY:([Expr1003] ASC, [Expr1004] ASC))
            |--Filter(WHERE:([Expr1003]>=(5)))
                 |--Compute Scalar(DEFINE:([Expr1003]=[test].[dbo].[FUNC1]([master].[dbo].[spt_values].[number])))
                      |--Filter(WHERE:([Expr1004]>=(5)))
                           |--Compute Scalar(DEFINE:([Expr1004]=[test].[dbo].[FUNC2]([master].[dbo].[spt_values].[number]), [Expr1006]=[test].[dbo].[FUNC2]([master].[dbo].[spt_values].[number])+(10)))
                                |--Index Scan(OBJECT:([master].[dbo].[spt_values].[ix2_spt_values_nu_nc]))
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1  
How do you know it got called twice? –  Gabriel McAdams Jan 22 '12 at 21:30
1  
The plan shows it is called once in the Filter expression, then the next operator along is a compute scalar that calls the function again, outputs the result as a column Expr1003 and that column is used both for the select and the order by. –  Martin Smith Jan 22 '12 at 21:40
1  
+good example. I'd assume that non-in-line-table UDF is always evaluated once per row per mention unless there is an obvious shortcut (eg ORDER BY expression exactly matches SELECT expression) –  gbn Jan 23 '12 at 7:27

Firstly, it depends on if the function is deterministic.

Even then, that will only be used for multiple calls on a single row.

I believe your case would be optimized if the function is deterministic.

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my function is deterministic, although I was hoping for an "I know for sure" answer, and not an "I believe" answer. –  Gabriel McAdams Jan 22 '12 at 21:37
    
@GabrielMcAdams When it comes to the optimizer, you can't guarantee anything - it's allowed to do whatever it wants as long as it preserves the semantics. This is particularly problematic with scalar UDFs. In general, avoid scalar UDFs called over large data sets or ensure they are only called once by using CTEs or temporary tables to ensure logical order of operations. In fact, it is sometimes far more efficient to turn a UDF into a pre-calculated lookup table even over a fairly large multi-dimansional domain. –  Cade Roux Jan 22 '12 at 21:44
    
+1 Supporting this answer if I create the function WITH SCHEMABINDING it then moves the compute scalar before the filter in the first query in my answer. –  Martin Smith Jan 22 '12 at 21:44
1  
But even with the schemabinding option if I try ORDER BY dbo.FUNC(number)+5 I see two calls per row rather than just one. –  Martin Smith Jan 22 '12 at 22:00
    
When I add WITH SCHEMABINDING, I only see it being called once (Compute Scalar - Filter and Sort are using the expression that was created during Compute Scalar) –  Gabriel McAdams Jan 22 '12 at 23:33

yes.

the optimizer has the sufficient knowledge to optimize this into a same calc while running.

you can look at the execution plan to see it.

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The execution plan doesn't appear to be accurate when it comes to CLR functions, recursion, and loops, though. –  Gabriel McAdams Jan 22 '12 at 21:27
    
does FUNc is clr enable func ? –  Royi Namir Jan 22 '12 at 21:28
    
in my case, FUNC is a CLR UDF –  Gabriel McAdams Jan 22 '12 at 21:29
    
@great so in the clr dll you can write to logEvent EventLog.WriteEntry... –  Royi Namir Jan 22 '12 at 21:33
    
ok. That's a good way to test it. Can you think of a way that is more isolated then the event log? I know you can't insert into a table, but is there something else I can do that'll put the counter somewhere by itself, easy to read? –  Gabriel McAdams Jan 22 '12 at 21:35

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