Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Please explain this code (it's simple but please bear with me because I'm still a noob :P):

public int fibonacci(int n)  {
    if(n == 0)
        return 0;
    else if(n == 1)
      return 1;
   else
      return fibonacci(n - 1) + fibonacci(n - 2);
}

I'm confused with the last line especially because if n = 5 for example, then fibonacci(4) + fibonacci(3) would be called and so on but I don't understand how this algorithm calculates the value at index 5 by this method. Please explain with a lot of detail!

share|improve this question
2  
Note that this is recursive and runs in exponential time. It's inefficient for large values of N. Using an iterative approach I was able to compute the first 10,000 numbers in the sequence. They can be found here - goo.gl/hnbF5 –  Adam Fisher Apr 29 '12 at 3:44
    
@AdamFisher: Can you please share the code you used for computing 10,000 numbers in sequence ? I am actually curios to know it. –  Shumail Mohy-ud-Din Oct 21 '13 at 12:23
add comment

14 Answers

up vote 32 down vote accepted

In fibonacci sequence each item is the sum of the previous two. So, you wrote a recursive algorithm.

So,

fibonacci(5) = fibonacci(4) + fibonacci(3)

fibonacci(3) = fibonacci(2) + fibonacci(1)

fibonacci(4) = fibonacci(3) + fibonacci(2)

fibonacci(2) = fibonacci(1) + fibonacci(0)

Now you already know fibonacci(1)==1 and fibonacci(0) == 0. So, you can subsequently calculate the other values.

Now,

fibonacci(2) = 1+0 = 1
fibonacci(3) = 1+1 = 2
fibonacci(4) = 2+1 = 3
fibonacci(5) = 3+2 = 5

And from fibonacci sequence 0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21.... we can see that for 5th element the fibonacci sequence returns 5.

See here for Recursion Tutorial.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much! This was very helpful! –  blah Jan 22 '12 at 22:15
    
nice to hear that. Than,you can accept the answer. –  RanRag Jan 22 '12 at 22:17
1  
@blah You should consider marking it as the answer . –  Adarsh Jun 1 '13 at 18:46
add comment

In pseudo code, where n = 5, the following takes place:

fibonacci(4) + fibonnacci(3)

This breaks down into:

(fibonacci(3) + fibonnacci(2)) + (fibonacci(2) + fibonnacci(1))

This breaks down into:

(((fibonacci(2) + fibonnacci(1)) + ((fibonacci(1) + fibonnacci(0))) + (((fibonacci(1) + fibonnacci(0)) + 1))

This breaks down into:

((((fibonacci(1) + fibonnacci(0)) + 1) + ((1 + 0)) + ((1 + 0) + 1))

This breaks down into:

((((1 + 0) + 1) + ((1 + 0)) + ((1 + 0) + 1))

This results in: 5

Given the fibonnacci sequence is 1 1 2 3 5 8 ..., the 5th element is 5. You can use the same methodology to figure out the other iterations.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Recursion can be hard to grasp sometimes. Just evaluate it on a piece of paper for a small number:

fib(4)
-> fib(3) + fib(2)
-> fib(2) + fib(1) + fib(1) + fib(0)
-> fib(1) + fib(0) + fib(1) + fib(1) + fib(0)
-> 1 + 0 + 1 + 1 + 0
-> 3

I am not sure how Java actually evaluates this, but the result will be the same.

share|improve this answer
add comment

in the fibonacci sequence, the first two items are 0 and 1, each other item is the sum of the two previous items. i.e:
0 1 1 2 3 5 8...

so the 5th item is the sum of the 4th and the 3rd items.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This is the best video I have found that fully explains recursion and the Fibonacci sequence in Java.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dsmBRUCzS7k

This is his code for the sequence and his explanation is better than I could ever do trying to type it out.

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    int index = 0;
    while (true)
    {
        System.out.println(fibonacci(index));
        index++;
    }
}
    public static long fibonacci (int i)
    {
        if (i == 0) return 0;
        if (i<= 2) return 1;

        long fibTerm = fibonacci(i - 1) + fibonacci(i - 2);
        return fibTerm;
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

There are 2 issues with your code:

  1. The result is stored in int which can handle only a first 48 fibonacci numbers, after this the integer fill minus bit and result is wrong.
  2. But you never can run fibonacci(50).
    The code
    fibonacci(n - 1) + fibonacci(n - 2)
    is very wrong.
    The problem is that the it calls fibonacci not 50 times but much more.
    At first it calls fibonacci(49)+fibonacci(48),
    next fibonacci(48)+fibonacci(47) and fibonacci(47)+fibonacci(46)
    Each time it became 2^n worse. enter image description here

The approach to non-recursive code:

 double fibbonaci(int n){
    double prev=0d, next=1d, result=0d;
    for (int i = 1; i <n; i++) {
        result=prev+next;
        prev=next;
        next=result;
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment
                                F(n)
                                /    \
                            F(n-1)   F(n-2)
                            /   \     /      \
                        F(n-2) F(n-3) F(n-3)  F(n-4)
                       /    \
                     F(n-3) F(n-4)

Important point to note is this algorithm is exponential because it does not store the result of previous calculated numbers. eg F(n-3) is called 3 times.

For more details refer algorithm by dasgupta chapter 0.2

share|improve this answer
add comment

I think this is a simple way:

public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
        int number = input.nextInt();
        long a = 0;
        long b = 1;
        for(int i = 1; i<number;i++){
            long c = a +b;
            a=b;
            b=c;
            System.out.println(c);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment
public long getFibonacci( int number) {
    if ( number <=2) {
        return 1;
    }
    long lRet = 0;
    lRet = getFibonacci( number -1) + getFibonacci( number -2);
    return lRet;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

It is a basic sequence that display or get a output of 1 1 2 3 5 8 it is a sequence that the sum of previous number the current number will be display next.

Try to watch link below Java Recursive Fibonacci sequence Tutorial

public static long getFibonacci(int number){
if(number<=1) return number;
else return getFibonacci(number-1) + getFibonacci(number-2);
}

Click Here Watch Java Recursive Fibonacci sequence Tutorial for spoon feeding

share|improve this answer
    
What he needed to understand is how the code works and why it is written they way it is written. –  Adarsh Jun 1 '13 at 17:14
    
I think i mention in my first sentence how it works? i write the code to make it more simple. btw, sorry. –  Jaymelson Galang Jun 2 '13 at 8:59
    
Nothing wrong with your code. Only the guy wanted to understand how that code worked. Check the answer by RanRag. Something of that sort :) –  Adarsh Jun 2 '13 at 12:28
    
ahh ok, sorry i am beginner here in stackoverflow. just want to help ^_^ –  Jaymelson Galang Jun 2 '13 at 12:47
add comment

Just to complement, if you want to be able to calculate larger numbers, you should use BigInteger.

An iterative example.

import java.math.BigInteger;
class Fibonacci{
    public static void main(String args[]){
        int n=10000;
        BigInteger[] vec = new BigInteger[n];
        vec[0]=BigInteger.ZERO;
        vec[1]=BigInteger.ONE;
        // calculating
        for(int i = 2 ; i<n ; i++){
            vec[i]=vec[i-1].add(vec[i-2]);
        }
        // printing
        for(int i = vec.length-1 ; i>=0 ; i--){
            System.out.println(vec[i]);
            System.out.println("");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

public class Fibonaci{

static void fibonacci() {
    int ptr1 = 1, ptr2 = 1, ptr3 = 0;
    int temp = 0;
    BufferedReader Data=new BufferedReader (new InputStreamReader(System.in));
   try {
        System.out.println("The Number Value's fib you required ? ");
        ptr3 = Integer.parseInt(Data.readLine());

    System.out.print(ptr1 + " " + ptr2 + " ");
    for (int i = 0; i < ptr3; i++) {
        System.out.print(ptr1 + ptr2 + " ");
        temp = ptr1;
        ptr1 = ptr2;
        ptr2 = temp + ptr2;
    }
   }catch(IOException err){
     System.out.println("Error!" + err);
 }catch(NumberFormatException err){
     System.out.println("Invald Input!");
 }
}

public static void main(String[]args)throws Exception{    
        Fibonaci.fibonacci();
}   

} You can do like this.
Thanks.

share|improve this answer
add comment

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci_number in more details

public class Fibonacci {

    public static long fib(int n) {
        if (n <= 1) return n;
        else return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int N = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
        for (int i = 1; i <= N; i++)
            System.out.println(i + ": " + fib(i));
    }

}

Make it that as simple as needed no need to use while loop and other loop

share|improve this answer
add comment

Fibonnaci series is one simple code that shows the power of dynamic programming. All we learnt from school days is to run it via iterative or max recursive code. Recursive code works fine till 20 or so, if you give numbers bigger than that you will see it takes a lot of time to compute... In dynamic programming you can code as follows and it takes secs to compute the answer.

static double fib(int n) {
    if (fib[n] != 0)
        return fib[n];
    if (n == 0)
        return 0;
    else if (n == 1)
        return 1;
    else
        fib[n] = fib(n - 1) + fib(n - 2);
    return (fib(n - 1) + fib(n - 2));
}

You store values in an array and proceed to fresh computation only when the array cannot provide you the answer.........

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.