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This is a noob question.

I have a simple WCF REST service, very simple, built from the tutorial.

It is very little code. Just IService1.cs, Service1.svc.cs, and my function lib.

The auto generated web.config has very very little in it.

The essence of the problem:

The MSDN docs, like this one, are not clear in explaining how the sections of the web.config files relate to/reference the code, and how they relate to/reference each other.

I can read the docs over and over, but unfortunately they do not help me actually implement a web.config.

I cannot find docs that explain simply:

"In your code, you have an entry point named /service1/foo So in the web.config, you create a <service> that refers to /service1/foo like this..., and then the <binding> entry ties to the <service> entry like this... then the <behavior> entry ties to the <service> entry like this...

The question (restated): How does it all hang together?

Background: I want to start using web.config to do throttling, as described here: http://www.danrigsby.com/blog/index.php/2008/02/20/how-to-throttle-a-wcf-service-help-prevent-dos-attacks-and-maintain-wcf-scalability/

But my web.config doesn't even have a <system.serviceModel> section.

Thank you!

(I should add that I just had dinner with an experienced .NET dev (7+ years), who said "Oh, the config file is horrible! I have never been able to understand it. I just do it all in code, and save my settings to my own settings file.")

Any input or guidance appreciated!

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I assume that you are looking for the section system.serviceModel in the config file of the application that is going to consume the WCF. The section will appear once you add the service reference to your WCF Service. Then you can play with the settings and experiment the throttle. –  Romeo Jan 22 '12 at 23:17
    
@Romi: " The section will appear once you add the service reference to your WCF Service" Nope, this doesn't work.... gives an error that it can't retrieve metadata (because it is rest, not soap...) –  Jonesome Jan 23 '12 at 1:08
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1 Answer

See this nice getting started tutorial, which shows how the code maps to the config: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/105273/Create-RESTful-WCF-Service-API-Step-By-Step-Guide

Alternately:

You can add that section manually if it is missing in your config. This link provide major sections of web.config/app.config for configuring WCF services.

It explains your question part one and 2nd part you can follow the link you posted.

here is section from the link I posted.

<system.ServiceModel>

   <services>
   <!—- Define the service endpoints. This section is optional in the new
    default configuration model in .NET Framework 4. -->
      <service>
         <endpoint/>
      </service>
   </services>

   <bindings>
   <!-- Specify one or more of the system-provided binding elements,
    for example, <basicHttpBinding> --> 
   <!-- Alternatively, <customBinding> elements. -->
      <binding>
      <!-- For example, a <BasicHttpBinding> element. -->
      </binding>
   </bindings>

   <behaviors>
   <!-- One or more of the system-provided or custom behavior elements. -->
      <behavior>
      <!-- For example, a <throttling> element. -->
      </behavior>
   </behaviors>

</system.ServiceModel>
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Thanks! I see all this in an abstract, but it is not clear what I should do for my service. E.g. what is the endpoint, etc. The MS docs are "great" but they do not clearly show the chain that helps someone create the config. –  Jonesome Jan 23 '12 at 1:11
    
Thank you, but unfortunately this is not enough information for me to actually implement a web.config. I cannot find docs that explain simply: "In your code, you have an entry point named /service1/foo So in the web.config, you create a service that refers to "/service1/foo" like this..., and then the <binding> entry ties to the <service> entry like this... then the <behavior> entry ties to the <service> entry like this... I sit and stare at these docs, but they fail to paint up how it all hangs together. Any input or guidance appreciated! –  Jonesome Jan 23 '12 at 5:17
    
I have rephrased the question to make it clearer what the issue is. Thx!! –  Jonesome Jan 23 '12 at 6:23
    
@Jonesome I think you are mixing basic stuff with advanced stuff. Link yo are trying implement is advanced stuff which you should avoid at the learning stage. I do agree MS docs can be bit too much to take when you start learning WCF.May be follow this link for step step Rest WCF confgi codeproject.com/Articles/105273/… –  Surjit Samra Jan 23 '12 at 9:28
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