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I have a tooltip for a Label and I want it to stay open until the user moves the mouse to a different control.

I have tried the following properties on the tooltip:

StaysOpen="True"

and

TooltipService.ShowDuration = "60000"

But in both cases the tooltip is only displayed for exactly 5 seconds.

Why are these values being ignored?

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There is a maximum value enforced somewhere for the ShowDuration property, think it is something like 30,000. Anything greater than that and it will default back to 5000. –  Dennis Sep 29 '11 at 10:43
1  
@Dennis: I tested this with WPF 3.5 and ToolTipService.ShowDuration="60000" worked. It did not default to back to 5000. –  M. Dudley Dec 2 '11 at 15:28
    
@emddudley: Does the ToolTip actually stay open for 60000ms? You can set the ToolTipService.ShowDuration property to any value >= 0 (to Int32.MaxValue) however the tooltip will not stay open for that length. –  Dennis Dec 2 '11 at 16:34
1  
@Dennis: Yes, it stayed open for exactly 60 seconds. This is on Windows 7. –  M. Dudley Dec 2 '11 at 18:23
    
@emddudley: That could be the difference. This was knowledge from when I was developing against Windows XP. –  Dennis Dec 2 '11 at 18:41

8 Answers 8

up vote 69 down vote accepted

TooltipService.ShowDuration works, but you must set it on the object having the Tooltip, like this:

<Label ToolTipService.ShowDuration="12000" Name="lblShowTooltip" Content="Shows tooltip">
    <Label.ToolTip>
        <ToolTip>
            <TextBlock>Hello world!</TextBlock>
        </ToolTip>
    </Label.ToolTip>
</Label>

I'd say that this design was chosen because it allows same tooltip with different timeouts on different controls.

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2  
It also allows you to specify the content of the ToolTip directly, without explicit <ToolTip>, which can make binding simpler. –  svick Nov 5 '12 at 11:36

Just for the sake of completeness: In code it looks like this:

ToolTipService.SetShowDuration(element, 60000);
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This was also driving me crazy tonight. I created a ToolTip subclass to handle the issue. For me, on .NET 4.0, the ToolTip.StaysOpen property is not "really" stays open.

In the class below, use the new property ToolTipEx.IsReallyOpen, instead of property ToolTip.IsOpen. You will get the control you want. Via the Debug.Print() call, you can watch in the debugger Output window just how many times this.IsOpen = false is called! So much for StaysOpen, or should I say "StaysOpen"? Enjoy.

public class ToolTipEx : ToolTip
{
    static ToolTipEx()
    {
        IsReallyOpenProperty =
            DependencyProperty.Register(
                "IsReallyOpen",
                typeof(bool),
                typeof(ToolTipEx),
                new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(
                    defaultValue: false,
                    flags: FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.None,
                    propertyChangedCallback: StaticOnIsReallyOpenedChanged));
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty IsReallyOpenProperty;

    protected static void StaticOnIsReallyOpenedChanged(
        DependencyObject o, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        ToolTipEx self = (ToolTipEx)o;
        self.OnIsReallyOpenedChanged((bool)e.OldValue, (bool)e.NewValue);
    }

    protected void OnIsReallyOpenedChanged(bool oldValue, bool newValue)
    {
        this.IsOpen = newValue;
    }

    public bool IsReallyOpen
    {
        get
        {
            bool b = (bool)this.GetValue(IsReallyOpenProperty);
            return b;
        }
        set { this.SetValue(IsReallyOpenProperty, value); }
    }

    protected override void OnClosed(RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.Print(String.Format(
            "OnClosed: IsReallyOpen: {0}, StaysOpen: {1}", this.IsReallyOpen, this.StaysOpen));
        if (this.IsReallyOpen && this.StaysOpen)
        {
            e.Handled = true;
            // We cannot set this.IsOpen directly here.  Instead, send an event asynchronously.
            // DispatcherPriority.Send is the highest priority possible.
            Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher.BeginInvoke(
                (Action)(() => this.IsOpen = true),
                DispatcherPriority.Send);
        }
        else
        {
            base.OnClosed(e);
        }
    }
}

Small rant: Why didn't Microsoft make DependencyProperty properties (getters/setters) virtual so we can accept/reject/adjust changes in subclasses? Or make a virtual OnXYZPropertyChanged for each and every DependencyProperty? Ugh.

---Edit---

My solution above looks weird in the XAML editor -- the tooltip is always showing, blocking some text in Visual Studio!

Here is a better way to solve this problem:

Some XAML:

<!-- Need to add this at top of your XAML file:
     xmlns:System="clr-namespace:System;assembly=mscorlib"
-->
<ToolTip StaysOpen="True" Placement="Bottom" HorizontalOffset="10"
        ToolTipService.InitialShowDelay="0" ToolTipService.BetweenShowDelay="0"
        ToolTipService.ShowDuration="{x:Static Member=System:Int32.MaxValue}"
>This is my tooltip text.</ToolTip>

Some code:

// Alternatively, you can attach an event listener to FrameworkElement.Loaded
public override void OnApplyTemplate()
{
    base.OnApplyTemplate();

    // Be gentle here: If someone creates a (future) subclass or changes your control template,
    // you might not have tooltip anymore.
    ToolTip toolTip = this.ToolTip as ToolTip;
    if (null != toolTip)
    {
        // If I don't set this explicitly, placement is strange.
        toolTip.PlacementTarget = this;
        toolTip.Closed += new RoutedEventHandler(OnToolTipClosed);
    }
}

protected void OnToolTipClosed(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    // You may want to add additional focus-related tests here.
    if (this.IsKeyboardFocusWithin)
    {
        // We cannot set this.IsOpen directly here.  Instead, send an event asynchronously.
        // DispatcherPriority.Send is the highest priority possible.
        Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher.BeginInvoke(
            (Action)delegate
                {
                    // Again: Be gentle when using this.ToolTip.
                    ToolTip toolTip = this.ToolTip as ToolTip;
                    if (null != toolTip)
                    {
                        toolTip.IsOpen = true;
                    }
                },
            DispatcherPriority.Send);
    }
}

Conclusion: Something is different about classes ToolTip and ContextMenu. Both have "service" classes, like ToolTipService and ContextMenuService, that manage certain properties, and both use Popup as a "secret" parent control during display. Finally, I noticed ALL the XAML ToolTip examples on the Web do not use class ToolTip directly. Instead, they embed a StackPanel with TextBlocks. Things that make you say: "hmmm..."

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You should get more votes on your answer just for its thoroughness. +1 from me. –  Hannish Apr 5 '13 at 12:00
ToolTipService.ShowDurationProperty.OverrideMetadata(
    typeof(DependencyObject), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(Int32.MaxValue));

It is working for me. Copy this line into your class constructor.

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Just put this code in initialization section.

ToolTipService.ShowDurationProperty.OverrideMetadata(
    typeof(DependencyObject), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(Int32.MaxValue));
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This was the only solution that worked for me. How can you adapt this code to set the Placement property to Top? new FrameworkPropertyMetadata("Top") doesn't work. –  InvalidBrainException Jul 16 at 11:33
    
This worked perfectly and is very simple to implement. +1 –  Caustix Jul 28 at 19:54

Also if you ever want to put any other control in your ToolTip, it won't be focusable since a ToolTip itself can get focus. So Like micahtan said, your best shot is a Popup.

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You probably want to use Popup instead of Tooltip, since Tooltip assumes that you're using it in the pre-defined UI-standards way.

I'm not sure why StaysOpen doesn't work, but ShowDuration works as documented in MSDN -- it's the amount of time the Tooltip is displayed WHEN it's displayed. Set it to a small amount (e.g. 500 msec) to see the difference.

The trick in your case is maintaining the "last hovered control" state, but once you have that it should be fairly trivial to change the placement target and the content dynamically (either manually, or via binding) if you're using one Popup, or hiding the last visible Popup if you're using multiple.

There are some gotchas with Popups as far as Window resizing and moving (Popups don't move w/the containers), so you may want to also have that in mind while you're tweaking the behavior. See this link for more details.

HTH.

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3  
Also beware that Popups are always on top of all desktop objects - even if you switch to another program, the popup will be visible and obscure part of the other program. –  Jeff B Jul 21 '09 at 13:53
    
That's exactly why I don't like using popups.... because they don't shrink with the program and they stay on top of all other programs. Also, resizing/moving the main application doesn't move the popup with it by default. –  Rachel Feb 4 '11 at 13:08

I was wrestling with the WPF Tooltip only the other day. It doesn't seem to be possible to stop it from appearing and disappearing by itself, so in the end I resorted to handling the Opened event. For example, I wanted to stop it from opening unless it had some content, so I handled the Opened event and then did this:

tooltip.IsOpen = (tooltip.Content != null);

It's a hack, but it worked.

Presumably you could similarly handle the Closed event and tell it to open again, thus keeping it visible.

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ToolTip has a property called HasContent which you could use instead –  benPearce Oct 25 '10 at 3:26
    
This worked for me, on Silverlight as well as WPF –  Dr. ABT Apr 1 '12 at 14:37

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