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Basically it boils down to, is there any case where it would be bad for me to call the success callback function on status codes under 400?

In looking at the list of status codes for HTTP, I don't think there would be but I want to make sure. I don't think I'll be getting 1XX level codes as they look like most of them return before the full request is processed and readyState === 4 (I don't care about IE 7's 122). And I want to still return success on a 302 and 304 status codes. So is status < 400 an acceptable way to catch all of this?

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Using HTTP status codes to signal success/failure of the handling script's performance is usually not a good idea. HTTP status codes should be limited to signaling http-level failures, not "zomg, your search request didn't find any results". –  Marc B Jan 23 '12 at 1:15
    
@MarcB This code will be for success and failure of loading of essential components. This will be for an HTML 5 game and I will be using an initial script to load all of the content while I display a loading screen. This is where the success/failure becomes important. If something doesn't load, I need to handle it and display a relevant message. –  Ktash Jan 23 '12 at 1:18
    
Then have the response return a json object, something along the lines of {"error":true,"code":401} and check that. signaling an http 401 indicates something happened at the http level, which is not true, everything about the http request worked perfectly. –  Marc B Jan 23 '12 at 15:29
    
@MarcB I will where JSON is appropriate. This really is very literally for HTTP error codes handling, not "there was an error in processing". I'm coding for all cases here. –  Ktash Jan 23 '12 at 16:27

2 Answers 2

A 301 means the client is responsible for making the HTTP call again with the new URL. Does your library or toolkit already handle this for you?

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I'm not using a library. This is all custom code in straight Javascript. This very well might be my answer though if the XMLHttpRequest object doesn't handle this automatically. –  Ktash Jan 23 '12 at 1:15
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From the XMLHttpRequest Spec sheet: "If the response is an HTTP redirect (status code 301, 302, 303 or 307), then it MUST be transparently followed (unless it violates security or infinite loop precautions). Any other error (including a 401) MUST cause the object to use that error page as the response." Looks like I might be safe with 301s. –  Ktash Jan 23 '12 at 1:24
    
Excellent. You might want to add that as an answer -- it's far more authoritative than my reading of the HTTP specification. :) –  sarnold Jan 23 '12 at 1:33
    
Added it. The skeptic in me still thinks there should be some case in which this doesn't work, but things seem to indicate that it should work. –  Ktash Jan 23 '12 at 1:41
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Building on @sarnold's concerns, it looks like the XMLHttpRequest specifications say the following:

If the response is an HTTP redirect (status code 301, 302, 303 or 307), then it MUST be transparently followed (unless it violates security or infinite loop precautions). Any other error (including a 401) MUST cause the object to use that error page as the response.

Which seems to indicate to me that either 2XX or 3XX responses are valid. So, in short, my findings indicate status < 400 is an appropriate status response check.

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