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I have this task that I've been working on, but am having extreme misgivings about my methodology.

So the problem is that I have a ton of excel files that are formatted strangely (and not consistently) and I need to extract certain fields for each entry. An example data set is

a look at the data

My original approach was this:

  1. Export to csv
  2. Separate into counties
  3. Separate into districts
  4. Analyze each district individually, pull out values
  5. write to output.csv

The problem I've run into is that the format (seemingly well organized) is almost random across files. Each line contains the same fields, but in a different order, spacing, and wording. I wrote a script to correctly process one file, but it doesn't work on any other files.

So my question is, is there a more robust method of approaching this problem rather than simple string processing? What I had in mind was more of a fuzzy logic approach for trying to pin which field an item was, which could handle the inputs being a little arbitrary. How would you approach this problem?

If it helps clear up the problem, here is the script I wrote:

# This file takes a tax CSV file as input
# and separates it into counties
# then appends each county's entries onto
# the end of the master out.csv
# which will contain everything including
# taxes, bonds, etc from all years

#import the data csv
import sys
import re
import csv

def cleancommas(x):
  toggle=False
  for i,j in enumerate(x):
    if j=="\"":
      toggle=not toggle
    if toggle==True:
      if j==",":
        x=x[:i]+" "+x[i+1:]
  return x

def districtatize(x):
  #list indexes of entries starting with "for" or "to" of length >5
  indices=[1]
  for i,j in enumerate(x):
    if len(j)>2:
      if j[:2]=="to":
        indices.append(i)
    if len(j)>3:
      if j[:3]==" to" or j[:3]=="for":
        indices.append(i)
    if len(j)>5:
      if j[:5]==" \"for" or j[:5]==" \'for":
        indices.append(i)
    if len(j)>4:
      if j[:4]==" \"to" or j[:4]==" \'to" or j[:4]==" for":
        indices.append(i)
  if len(indices)==1:
    return [x[0],x[1:len(x)-1]]
  new=[x[0],x[1:indices[1]+1]]
  z=1
  while z<len(indices)-1:
    new.append(x[indices[z]+1:indices[z+1]+1])
    z+=1
  return new
  #should return a list of lists. First entry will be county
  #each successive element in list will be list by district

def splitforstos(string):
  for itemind,item in enumerate(string):      # take all exception cases that didn't get processed
    splitfor=re.split('(?<=\d)\s\s(?=for)',item)  # correctly and split them up so that the for begins
    splitto=re.split('(?<=\d)\s\s(?=to)',item)    # a cell
    if len(splitfor)>1:
      print "\n\n\nfor detected\n\n"
      string.remove(item)
      string.insert(itemind,splitfor[0])
      string.insert(itemind+1,splitfor[1])
    elif len(splitto)>1:
      print "\n\n\nto detected\n\n"
      string.remove(item)
      string.insert(itemind,splitto[0])
      string.insert(itemind+1,splitto[1])

def analyze(x):
  #input should be a string of content
  #target values are nomills,levytype,term,yearcom,yeardue
  clean=cleancommas(x)
  countylist=clean.split(',')
  emptystrip=filter(lambda a: a != '',countylist)
  empt2strip=filter(lambda a: a != ' ', emptystrip)
  singstrip=filter(lambda a: a != '\' \'',empt2strip)
  quotestrip=filter(lambda a: a !='\" \"',singstrip)
  splitforstos(quotestrip)
  distd=districtatize(quotestrip)
  print '\n\ndistrictized\n\n',distd
  county = distd[0]
  for x in distd[1:]:
    if len(x)>8:
      district=x[0]
      vote1=x[1]
      votemil=x[2]
      spaceindex=[m.start() for m in re.finditer(' ', votemil)][-1]
      vote2=votemil[:spaceindex]
      mills=votemil[spaceindex+1:]
      votetype=x[4]
      numyears=x[6]
      yearcom=x[8]
      yeardue=x[10]
      reason=x[11]
      data = [filename,county,district, vote1, vote2, mills, votetype, numyears, yearcom, yeardue, reason]
      print "data",data
    else:
      print "x\n\n",x
      district=x[0]
      vote1=x[1]
      votemil=x[2]
      spaceindex=[m.start() for m in re.finditer(' ', votemil)][-1]
      vote2=votemil[:spaceindex]
      mills=votemil[spaceindex+1:]
      votetype=x[4]
      special=x[5]
      splitspec=special.split(' ')
      try:
        forind=[i for i,j in enumerate(splitspec) if j=='for'][0]
        numyears=splitspec[forind+1]
        yearcom=splitspec[forind+6]
      except:
        forind=[i for i,j in enumerate(splitspec) if j=='commencing'][0]
        numyears=None
        yearcom=splitspec[forind+2]
      yeardue=str(x[6])[-4:]
      reason=x[7]
      data = [filename,county,district,vote1,vote2,mills,votetype,numyears,yearcom,yeardue,reason]
      print "data other", data
    openfile=csv.writer(open('out.csv','a'),delimiter=',', quotechar='|',quoting=csv.QUOTE_MINIMAL)
    openfile.writerow(data)

# call the file like so: python tax.py 2007May8Tax.csv
filename = sys.argv[1] #the file is the first argument
f=open(filename,'r')
contents=f.read() #entire csv as string
#find index of every instance of the word county
separators=[m.start() for m in re.finditer('\w+\sCOUNTY',contents)] #alternative implementation in regex

# split contents into sections by county
# analyze each section and append to out.csv
for x,y in enumerate(separators):
  try:
    data = contents[y:separators[x+1]]
  except:
    data = contents[y:]
  analyze(data)
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7  
The best and most reliable way to solve this is to force the people providing you with this data to follow a standard format, but I don't know if that is an option available to you. Without enforcing some structure, the people providing this data will be constantly breaking your program. –  Robert Harvey Jan 23 '12 at 1:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

is there a more robust method of approaching this problem rather than simple string processing?

Not really.

What I had in mind was more of a fuzzy logic approach for trying to pin which field an item was, which could handle the inputs being a little arbitrary. How would you approach this problem?

After a ton of analysis and programming, it won't be significantly better than what you've got.

Reading stuff prepared by people requires -- sadly -- people-like brains.

You can mess with NLTK to try and do a better job, but it doesn't work out terribly well either.

You don't need a radically new approach. You need to streamline the approach you have.

For example.

  district=x[0]
  vote1=x[1]
  votemil=x[2]
  spaceindex=[m.start() for m in re.finditer(' ', votemil)][-1]
  vote2=votemil[:spaceindex]
  mills=votemil[spaceindex+1:]
  votetype=x[4]
  numyears=x[6]
  yearcom=x[8]
  yeardue=x[10]
  reason=x[11]
  data = [filename,county,district, vote1, vote2, mills, votetype, numyears, yearcom, yeardue, reason]
  print "data",data

Might be improved by using a named tuple.

Then build something like this.

data = SomeSensibleName( 
    district= x[0], 
    vote1=x[1], ... etc.
)

So that you're not creating a lot of intermediate (and largely uninformative) loose variables.

Also, keep looking at your analyze function (and any other function) to pull out the various "pattern matching" rules. The idea is that you'll examine a county's data, step through a bunch of functions until one matches the pattern; this will also create the named tuple. You want something like this.

for p in ( some, list, of, functions ):
    match= p(data)
    if match: 
        return match

Each function either returns a named tuple (because it liked the row) or None (because it didn't like the row).

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