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I am building a series of classes that inherit from a common class. The instances of the classes get built by this code (props to this guy):

def self.create(service, logger)
  classified_name = service.name.to_s.split('_').collect! { |w| w.capitalize }.join << "Processor"
  service_proc = Object.const_get(classified_name).new
  service_proc.logger = logger ||= Rails::logger

OK so everything was working fine, until I ran into a service that had a numeral in the name. This might seem like a bad idea but in this case the Processor is named after an external service that has an numeral in the name. I decided to keep that numeral to avoid confusion. "HToB" has no meaning, while "H2B" actually does in the context of my app.

Well, suddenly the create method died:

NoMethodError: undefined method `logger=' for #<H2bProcessor:0xb737f20>

OK, odd. Keep in mind that I've got 4 other classes that are being built by the same factory method. Logger is a property of the base class. So I mess with it a bit, then decide that the numeral is probably screwing things up. So I try loading the file with and without the numeral in the name of the class:

>> load("/mnt/hgfs/kodiak/lib/processors/H2b_processor.rb")
TypeError: superclass mismatch for class H2bProcessor
    from /mnt/hgfs/kodiak/lib/processors/H2b_processor.rb:1:in `<top (required)>'
[...]
[change the 2 in the name to "To"]
[...]
>> load("/mnt/hgfs/kodiak/lib/processors/H2b_processor.rb")
=> true

OK, so, problem solved. However, it really left me wondering: does having numerals in names of classes screws up Ruby in some way? I googled a bit but didn't know what to search for, things like 'naming convention ruby numeral' didn't get me any results.

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Where is the numeral? You can't have a number at the start of your class, but anywhere else you can. This is part of the formal grammar specification. –  d11wtq Jan 23 '12 at 2:16
    
You can see the class name on the NoMethodError line –  jcollum Jan 23 '12 at 2:34
    
While you can use a number to differentiate one sub-class from another, I think that leads to code-smell. The point of having different classes is to cover different data-grouping and processing needs. Sub-classing is to provide a partial set of features to build on. If a class is important enough to sub-class, I'd argue it's important enough to have a significant name to define what it is. If the differences are so subtle you can use a number, then incorporate those differences into the parent class and use logic to apply the difference, or block/yield when calling a method. –  the Tin Man Jan 23 '12 at 9:23
    
@theTinMan I think you're misunderstanding why there's a 2 there. In this case the class is named after the service which really does have a 2 in the name. I'd prefer to keep the class name similar to the service -- well that was the pattern I started with anyway. –  jcollum Jan 23 '12 at 16:32
    
A downvote? Why? This is something that I actually saw and I documented it very well. Ridiculous. –  jcollum Jan 25 '12 at 2:18
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're not allowed to have numbers at the start, but otherwise you should be right.

class H2O
end

H2O.new # Works fine

class 2Extreme
end

SyntaxError: compile error
(irb):5: trailing `E' in number
class 2Extreme
        ^
(irb):5: syntax error, unexpected tIDENTIFIER, expecting tCOLON2 or '[' or '.'
    from (irb):6
    from :0
share|improve this answer
    
You'd think so, but not the case here. It's got something to do with inheritance -- the methods in the base class are available in the created object but the methods in the actual class are not. When I change the class name to HbProcessor, suddenly everything is fine. –  jcollum Jan 23 '12 at 16:56
    
@jcollum: Can you provide a minimal code example that reproduces the bug you're talking about? There's code in your question that isn't relevant to this bug, and there's code missing that I need to reproduce this bug. –  Andrew Grimm Jan 23 '12 at 23:01
    
In the end the class that needed to have a numeral in the middle ended up not being used. I'll mark this as the answer and move on. –  jcollum Jan 31 '12 at 6:16
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NoMethodError: undefined method `logger=' for #<H2bProcessor:0xb737f20>

Looking at this message, the class loading seems to succeeded. I think it just simpley didn't have 'logger=' method.

And for below error, look at this question. You are getting error because already have H2bPrecessor class.

>> load("/mnt/hgfs/kodiak/lib/processors/H2b_processor.rb")
TypeError: superclass mismatch for class H2bProcessor
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I debugged right before the line that creates the logger. The object that gets created has the methods of the base class, but none from the class. Change the class name to "HtoBProcessor" and suddenly it's all fine. –  jcollum Jan 23 '12 at 16:59
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Its not good coding practice in general to start putting in numbers. My favorite is Textbox1, Textbox2, ect. Basically a good rule of thumb is to describe what your class is, or stick it in a container array if you have multiple. I do recognize the code is generated but i think it could have been done better.

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