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The element has 0px dimensions and is absolutely positioned by -10000px. I've seen similar hidden divs on other sites, and they're always called near the top of the source code and contain no other elements.

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2 Answers 2

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It is used for Screen readers to read out for blind people.Generally there are certain W3C's rules specified for others tag also like alt="" so that the blind or vision impaired people can access the web through screen readers.Blind users for example, cannot position a cursor visually and so use the keyboard in conjunction with a screen reader to access the different elements of a Web page. People with severe physical disabilities rely on simple switching devices, which mirror the function of the keyboard tab key, to move around the page.In most of the standard sites you might have seen the <h1 class="logo"><strong>Site Name</strong></h1> tags for that they have defined CSS like this:

.header .logo strong {
font-size: 0;
height: 0;
left: -999em;
line-height: 0;
overflow: hidden;
position: absolute;
text-indent: -999em;
top: -999em;
width: 0;

} So that it can be easily accessible to the screen readers.

You can read out more information by browsing these links:-

http://www.webbie.org.uk/webbie.htm 
http://www-03.ibm.com/able/guidelines/web/webcss.html
http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG10-TECHS/#Techniques
http://www.unleashwebaccess.com/2011/02/help-blind-users-read-your-blog-help-everyone/

Hope this info will some how help you to come over your curiosity..:)

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Thanks, it was difficult to see any meaning to the elements, since they contained absolutely no content. But considering accessibility, they sort of make sense now. –  unblevable Jan 26 '12 at 20:27

Whenever you see an element concealed by a weird position rather than display: none, it's likely being used to store the results of an asynchronous call for later use.

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