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A couple of month ago I wrote a simple program in Java.

I have two overloaded methods called F and one of them takes variable length argument. This program will not compile, because calling F(4) in main method is ambiguous and the compiler does not know which method to choose.

class Example
{
    static void F(int... array)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("We are in first method");    
    }

    static void F(int x, int ... array)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("We are in second method");    
    }

    static void main()
    {
        F(4);
    }
}

I wrote an equivalent program in C# as below and I was expecting a compile-error. Surprisingly the program compiled successfully without any error.

The output of the program is "We are in second method" which means that the second overloaded method was chosen !!!

Isn't this strange ?? Both F methods can be a candidate for calling, but why CLR chooses the second overloaded method ???

class Example
{
    static void F(params int[] array)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("We are in first method");    
    }

    static void F(int x, params int[] array)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("We are in second method");    
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        F(4);
    }
}
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closed as not constructive by Chris Shain, karthik, Tim Medora, Daniel Fischer, bmargulies Jan 23 '12 at 20:40

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3  
What's confusing about it? Java is not C#... they are different in so many ways... this is one of them. –  Jeff Mercado Jan 23 '12 at 4:39
1  
possible duplicate of C# params keyword with two parameters of the same type –  Chris Shain Jan 23 '12 at 4:40
    
I'm asking why ? The approach which is taken in java is reasonable. Why C# took this approach, because both methods can be called. –  ManiAm Jan 23 '12 at 4:41
2  
I'm sure it's all covered in the language specifications for each of the languages. Java took one approach while C# took the other. Why should that matter? –  Jeff Mercado Jan 23 '12 at 4:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

C# takes that approach because it says so in the C# language specification:

7.4.3.2 Better function member Given an argument list A with a set of argument expressions { E1, E2, ..., EN } and two applicable function members MP and MQ with parameter types { P1, P2, ..., PN } and { Q1, Q2, ..., QN }, MP is defined to be a better function member than MQ if

• for each argument, the implicit conversion from EX to QX is not better than the implicit conversion from EX to PX, and

• for at least one argument, the conversion from EX to PX is better than the conversion from EX to QX. When performing this evaluation, if MP or MQ is applicable in its expanded form, then PX or QX refers to a parameter in the expanded form of the parameter list. In case the parameter type sequences {P1, P2, …, PN} and {Q1, Q2, …, QN} are identical, the following tie-breaking rules are applied, in order, to determine the better function member.

• If MP is a non-generic method and MQ is a generic method, then MP is better than MQ.

Otherwise, if MP is applicable in its normal form and MQ has a params array and is applicable only in its expanded form, then MP is better than MQ.

Otherwise, if MP has fewer declared parameters than MQ, then MP is better than MQ. This can occur if both methods have params arrays and are applicable only in their expanded forms.

• Otherwise, if MP has more specific parameter types than MQ, then MP is better than MQ. Let {R1, R2, …, RN} and {S1, S2, …, SN} represent the uninstantiated and unexpanded parameter types of MP and MQ. MP’s parameter types are more specific than MQ’s if, for each parameter, RX is not less specific than SX, and, for at least one parameter, RX is more specific than SX:

o A type parameter is less specific than a non-type parameter.

o Recursively, a constructed type is more specific than another constructed type (with the same number of type arguments) if at least one type argument is more specific and no type argument is less specific than the corresponding type argument in the other.

o An array type is more specific than another array type (with the same number of dimensions) if the element type of the first is more specific than the element type of the second.

• Otherwise if one member is a non-lifted operator and the other is a lifted operator, the non-lifted one is better.

• Otherwise, neither function member is better.

EDIT: Had the wrong section highlighted. Fixed now.

share|improve this answer

Params can also take zero arguments , so in this case when you call in F(4) it assumes that the arguments are not passed and since 4 is int the corresponding method is called.

params

The params keyword lets you specify a method parameter that takes a variable number of arguments. You can send a comma-separated list of arguments of the type specified in the parameter declaration, or an array of arguments of the specified type. You also can send no arguments.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for just answering the question. –  Yonix Jan 23 '12 at 5:00

I believe it chooses the second method because you are passing it an integer and not an array of integers.

share|improve this answer
    
yes. I know which method will be chosen, but why C# took this approach ? –  ManiAm Jan 23 '12 at 4:44

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