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I have some Python code that I'm porting to Javascript:

word_groups = defaultdict(set)
for sentence in sentences:
    sentence.tokens = stemmed_words(sentence.str_)
    for token in sentence.tokens:
        word_groups[sentence.actual_val].add(token)

I don't know a lot about Javascript, so this was the best I could do:

var word_groups = {}
for(var isent = 0; isent < sentences.length; isent++) {
    var sentence = sentences[isent]
    sentence.tokens = stemmed_words(sentence.str_)
    for(var itoken = 0; itoken < sentence.tokens.length; itoken++) {
        var token = sentence.tokens[itoken]
        if(!(sentence.actual_val in word_groups))
            word_groups[sentence.actual_val] = []
        var group = word_groups[sentence.actual_val]
        if(!(token in group))
            group.push(token)
    }
}

Can anyone suggest ways to make the javascript code look more like the python?

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2  
Probably belongs on codereview.stackexchange. –  Jordan Jan 23 '12 at 4:56
3  
Can you make English look more like Chinese? –  epascarello Jan 23 '12 at 4:56
2  
@epascarello, Although I understand the point of your question, asking how to express JS code in a more succinct manner is a good question. –  zzzzBov Jan 23 '12 at 5:11
    
You are expecting others to know both Python and javascript (ECMAScript really) better than you. It might be better to explain exactly what the Python code is doing so that a suitable javascript equivalent can be suggested. Your ECMAScript code seems a little confusing, especially the last if..in block. –  RobG Jan 23 '12 at 5:24
    
@RobG I don't really know if I can express it better than that Javascript code. DefaultDict means dictionary that auto-assigns a default value if you try to access a key that isn't present. Set is kind of like a list, only every element is unique. So create an empty set for this key if this key is not in the dict and then add the token to the set (implying that we don't add the token if an instance of the value is already there). –  Jesse Aldridge Jan 23 '12 at 5:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm going to assume that if you're using an environment where forEach is available, reduce and Object.keys are available as well. (e.g. ECMAScript >= 1.8.5):

var word_groups = sentences.reduce(function (groups, sentence) {
  var val = sentence.actual_val
  var group = groups[val] = groups[val] || []
  stemmed_words(sentence.str_).forEach(function (t) {
    if (!(t in group)) group.push(t)
  })
  return groups
}, {})
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Pretty cool. Thanks. –  Jesse Aldridge Jan 23 '12 at 16:54

It's quite possible that I've misinterpreted what your Python code does, but assuming you're after word counts, I'd write it as follows:

var word_groups = {}
sentences.forEach(function (sentence) {
  sentence.tokens = stemmed_words(sentence.str_)
  sentence.tokens.forEach(function (token) {
    var val = sentence.actual_val
    word_groups[val] = (word_groups[val] || 0) + 1
  })
})

The above will fail should the word "constructor" appear in the input. It's possible to work around this JavaScript quirk:

var word_groups = {}
sentences.forEach(function (sentence) {
  sentence.tokens = stemmed_words(sentence.str_)
  sentence.tokens.forEach(function (token) {
    var val = sentence.actual_val
    if (!word_groups.hasOwnProperty(val)) word_groups[val] = 0
    word_groups[val] += 1
  })
})
share|improve this answer
    
Not after word counts. Each sentence has a value (1, 2, or 3) and I want to group the unique words from every sentence with the same value. So basically, if the set of sentences which have a value of 3 are ['foo bar', 'foo baz', 'bar baz ball'], then word_groups[3] == ['foo', 'bar', 'baz', 'ball'] –  Jesse Aldridge Jan 23 '12 at 5:50
    
forEach does look nice though. Thanks for that. –  Jesse Aldridge Jan 23 '12 at 5:52

If you're not definitely in Javascript 1.6 or higher (notable IE 8 has Javascript 1.5) you may want jQuery as a compatibility layer. For example $.each(a, f) is compatible with a.forEach(f).

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