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I need to refactor existing code by collapsing a method that's copy-and-pasted between various classed that inherit from one another into a single method. So I produced the following code:

class A(object):
    def rec(self):
        return 1

class B(A):
    def rec(self):
        return self.rec_gen(B)

    def rec_gen(self, rec_class):
        return super(rec_class, self).rec() + 1

class C(B):
    def rec(self):
        return self.rec_gen(C)

if __name__=='__main__':
    b = B(); c = C()
    print c.rec()
    print b.rec()

And the output:

3
2

What still bothers me is that in the 'rec' method I need to tell 'rec_gen' the context of the class in which it's running. Is there a way for 'rec_gen' to figure it out by itself in runtime?

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1  
Not really sure what your trying to do, but I believe you can get the class from self.__class__ –  monkut Jan 23 '12 at 7:03
    
@monkut, this is not possible, because self.__class__ always has the calling class, so if I call c.rec(), self.__class__.__name__ will always be 'C' –  Ran Moshe Jan 23 '12 at 8:03
    
@monkut Doing that is likely to lead to infinite recursion - self.__class__ is always the actual class of the object, not the class where the method you're currently in was defined. –  Tim Delaney Jan 23 '12 at 8:03
    
self.__class__ is all you need. –  jsbueno Jan 23 '12 at 11:59
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This capability has been added to Python 3 - see PEP 3135. In a nutshell:

class B(A):
    def rec(self):
        return super().rec() + 1

I think you've created the convoluted rec()/rec_gen() setup because you couldn't automatically find the class, but in case you want that anyway the following should work:

class A(object):
    def rec(self):
        return 1

class B(A):
    def rec(self):
        # __class__ is a cell that is only created if super() is in the method
        super()
        return self.rec_gen(__class__)

    def rec_gen(self, rec_class):
        return super(rec_class, self).rec() + 1

class C(B):
    def rec(self):
        # __class__ is a cell that is only created if super() is in the method
        super()
        return self.rec_gen(__class__)

The simplest solution in Python 2 is to use a private member to hold the super object:

class B(A):
    def __init__(self):
        self.__super = super(B)

    def rec(self):
        return self.__super.rec() + 1

But that still suffers from the need to specify the actual class in one place, and if you happen to have two identically-named classes in the class hierarchy (e.g. from different modules) this method will break.

There were a couple of us who made recipes for automatic resolution for Python 2 prior to the existence of PEP 3135 - my method is at self.super on ActiveState. Basically, it allows the following:

class B(A, autosuper):
    def rec(self):
        return self.super().rec() + 1

or in the case that you're calling a parent method with the same name (the most common case):

class B(A, autosuper):
    def rec(self):
        return self.super() + 1

Caveats to this method:

  1. It's quite slow. I have a version sitting around somewhere that does bytecode manipulation to improve the speed a lot.

  2. It's not consistent with PEP 3135 (although it was a proposal for the Python 3 super at one stage).

  3. It's quite complex.

  4. It's a mix-in base class.

I don't know if the above would enable you to meet your requirements. With a small change to the recipe though you could find out what class you're in and pass that to rec_gen() - basically extract the class-finding code out of _getSuper() into its own method.

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Thanks Tim. I'll try it. –  Ran Moshe Jan 23 '12 at 8:10
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An alternative solution for python 2.x would be to use a metaclass to automatically define the rec method in all your subclasses:

class RecGen(type):
    def __new__(cls, name, bases, dct):
        new_cls = super(RecGen, cls).__new__(cls, name, bases, dct)

        if bases != (object,):
            def rec(self):
                return super(new_cls, self).rec() + 1
            new_cls.rec = rec

        return new_cls

class A(object):
    __metaclass__ = RecGen
    def rec(self):
        return 1

class B(A):
    pass

class C(B):
    pass

Note that if you're just trying to get something like the number of parent classes, it would be easier to use self.__class__.__mro__ directly:

class A(object):
    def rec(self):
        return len(self.__class__.__mro__)-1

class B(A):
    pass

class C(B):
    pass
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I'm not sure exactly what you're trying to achieve, but if it is just to have a method that returns a different constant value for each class then use class attributes to store the value. It isn't clear at all from your example that you need to go anywhere near super().

class A(object):
    REC = 1
    def rec(self):
        return self.REC

class B(A):
    REC = 2

class C(B):
    REC = 3

if __name__=='__main__':
    b = B(); c = C()
    print c.rec()
    print b.rec()
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