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The Problem: Exercise 2-8 of The C Programming Language, "Write a function rightrot(x,n) that returns the value of the integer x, rotated to the right by n positions."

I have done this every way that I know how. Here is the issue that I am having. Take a given number for this exercise, say 29, and rotate it right one position.
11101 and it becomes 11110 or 30. Let's say for the sake of argument that the system we are working on has an unsigned integer type size of 32 bits. Let's further say that we have the number 29 stored in an unsigned integer variable. In memory the number will have 27 zeros ahead of it. So when we rotate 29 right one using one of several algorithms mine is posted below, we get the number 2147483662. This is obviously not the desired result.

unsigned int rightrot(unsigned x, int n) {
    return (x >> n) | (x << (sizeof(x) * CHAR_BIT) - n);
}

Technically, this is correct, but I was thinking that the 27 zeros that are in front of 11101 were insignificant. I have also tried a couple of other solutions:

int wordsize(void) {    // compute the wordsize on a given machine...
    unsigned x = ~0;
    int b;
    for(b = 0; x; b++)
        x &= x-1;
    return x;
}

unsigned int rightrot(unsigned x, int n) {
    unsigned rbit;
    while(n --) {
        rbit = x >> 1;
        x |= (rbit << wordsize() - 1);
    }
    return x;

This last and final solution is the one where I thought that I had it, I will explain where it failed once I get to the end. I am sure that you will see my mistake...

int bitcount(unsigned x) {
    int b;
    for(b = 0; x; b++)
        x &= x-1;
    return b;
}

unsigned int rightrot(unsigned x, int n) {
    unsigned rbit;
    int shift = bitcount(x);
    while(n--) {
        rbit = x & 1;
        x >>= 1;
        x |= (rbit << shift);
    }
}

This solution gives the expected answer of 30 that I was looking for, but if you use a number for x like oh say 31 (11111), then there are issues, specifically the outcome is 47, using one for n. I did not think of this earlier, but if a number like 8 (1000) is used then mayhem. There is only one set bit in 8, so the shift is most certainly going to be wrong. My theory at this point is that the first two solutions are correct (mostly) and I am just missing something...

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I'll take that to mean that the behaviour of the first two examples was correct, and I am not going insane. –  Brandon Jan 23 '12 at 7:42
3  
I'm not sure about your assumption that 2147483662 is the wrong answer. It looks right to me! The question does say "the integer x", which implies a certain number of bits in x, e.g. 32. Otherwise, should rightrot(1,1) always return 1? –  Mr Lister Jan 23 '12 at 7:45
    
Mr. Lister, I concede entirely. There are apparently some conceptions that I had about binay, the way it is stored, and the way that it is interpreted that were wrong. I assumed that the value was wrong in the first place, because I was taking the 27 zeros proceeding the value that I was using in memory not to be significant to that value. and I do get what you are saying about one. If rightrot(1,1) always returned 1 then how could one left rotate a number like 1000 or 10000000000000000000000000000000. –  Brandon Jan 23 '12 at 8:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A bitwise rotation is always necessarily within an integer of a given width. In this case, as you're assuming a 32-bit integer, 2147483662 (0b10000000000000000000000000001110) is indeed the correct answer; you aren't doing anything wrong!

0b11110 would not be considered the correct result by any reasonable definition, as continuing to rotate it right using the same definition would never give you back the original input. (Consider that another right rotation would give 0b1111, and continuing to rotate that would have no effect.)

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4  
It took me almost ten hours to cave and ask for help. I thought that I had lost my mind, I did learn though, and at least now I know that my sanity and ability to do simple math are intact. Thank you. –  Brandon Jan 23 '12 at 7:46
    
I can certainly see the problems. For instance, the question doesn't mention whether the integers are 16 or 32 bits, and that is a very important distinction in this case: the results would be different. Ditto with signed integers: ROTting an odd number would have a negative result. So it's good to wonder about this and not simply write the routine without thinking about the results. –  Mr Lister Jan 23 '12 at 8:30

You could find the location of the first '1' in the 32-bit value using binary search. Then note the bit in the LSB location, right shift the value by the required number of places, and put the LSB bit in the location of the first '1'.

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I thought about using a binsearch, but the book claims that the exercises can be answered using the information given to you up to the exercise. The authors don't discuss the particulars of sorting/searching until later in the book. –  Brandon Jan 23 '12 at 7:41
    
I agree with @duskwuff here; You shouldn't really be doing this. –  user191776 Jan 23 '12 at 7:44
int bitcount(unsigned x) {
    int b;
    for(b = 0; x; b++)
        x &= x-1;
    return b;
}

unsigned rightrot(unsigned x,int n) {
   int b = bitcount(x);
   unsigned a = (x&~(~0<<n))<<(b-n+1);
   x>> = n;
   x| = a;
}
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1  
example , if we want to rotate 10101011 by 3 bit positions to get 01110101 , then we will simply do 01100000|00010101 . to get 01100000 we do (x&~(0<<n))<<(b-n+1). and to get 0010101 we do x>>n –  shivani jain Aug 18 '12 at 7:38

In my opinion, the spirit of the section of the book which immediately precedes this exercise would have the reader do this problem without knowing anything about the size (in bits) of integers, or any other type. The examples in the section do not require that information; I don't believe the exercises should either.

Regardless of my belief, the book had not yet introduced the sizeof operator by section 2.9, so the only way to figure the size of a type is to count the bits "by hand".

But we don't need to bother with all that. We can do rightrot(n) in exactly n steps, no matter how many bits there are in the data type, by rotating one bit at a time.

It's easy to create masks for the high and low bits of any type, without needing to know the size of the type (in bits). The low bit is just 1 in that type:

unsigned char/short/int/long low1 = 1u;

To get the high bit, complement zero in that type to get all 1s, then shift right by one to get a zero in the high bit, then complement again --

unsigned char/short/int/long high1 = ~(~0u >> 1);

/* 0000..0000b, complement to get
   1111..1111b, shift right 1 to get
   0111..1111b, complement again to get
   1000..0000b
*/

Using only the parts of the language that are covered by the book up to section 2.9, here's my implementation (with integer parameters, but would work for any integral type): Loop n times, x >> 1 each iteration; if the old low bit of x was 1, set the new high bit.

unsigned int rightrot(unsigned int x, unsigned int n) {
    unsigned int low1 = 1u;            /* 0x00..01 */
    unsigned int high1 = ~(~0u >> 1);  /* 0x80..00 */
    unsigned int lowbit;

    while (n-- > 0) {        /* repeat n times */
        lowbit = x & low1;   /* save low bit */
        x = x >> 1;          /* right-shift by 1; 0 shifted into high bit */
        if (lowbit == low1)
            x = x | high1;   /* set high bit to 1 if low bit was 1 */
    }

    return x;
}
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