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I have the following XML:

<p:persons>
<p:surname>Surname1</p:surname>
<p:forename>Forename1</p:forname>
<p:surname>Surname2</p:surname>
</p:persons>

Both surname and forename nodes are optional. I'd like to transform this XML to HTML or plain text and display something like:

-- Person1 --
surname: Surname1
forename: Forename1

-- Person2 --
surname: Surname2
forename: UNKNOWN

Please note that the XML could also look like because forename and surname are both optional:

<p:persons>
<p:forename>Forename1</p:surname>
<p:surname>Surname1</p:surname>
<p:forename>Forename2</p:forname>
</p:persons>

Thanks!

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3  
Why does the forename "Forename1" map to person 1 in your example? Because it's the first p:forename node? –  flyx Jan 23 '12 at 9:16
1  
The structure of your input XML does not make sense! how do you know which surname related to which forename? I would expect them to be grouped within p:person elements. –  ColinE Jan 23 '12 at 9:17
    
And based on what rule should be determined which nodes belong together if the <p:forename> doesn't belong to the preceding <p:surname>? What have you tried? –  Filburt Jan 23 '12 at 9:19
1  
Looks like the only valid answer is: "Ain't gonna happen". Whoever handed you this specs will have to rethink and refactor. –  Filburt Jan 23 '12 at 9:23
1  
@danleadgy whoever wrote the source XML needs to be slapped with a soggy fish. It makes no sense at all! XML is an expressive and structured 'language'. Using it as an ordered list of named values is quite ludicrous! –  ColinE Jan 23 '12 at 9:34
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

While I think this spec is severely wrong, here is a snippet that does what you want:

<xsl:template name="writePersons">
  <xsl:param name="list"/>
  <xsl:param name="index" select="1"/>

  <xsl:if test="count($list/p:forename[$index]|$list/p:surname[$index]) &gt; 0">
    <xsl:text>-- Person</xsl:text>
    <xsl:value-of select="$index"/>
    <xsl:text> --&#x0A;surname: </xsl:text>
    <xsl:choose>
      <xsl:when test="$list/p:surname[$index]">
        <xsl:value-of select="$list/p:surname[$index]"/>
      </xsl:when>
      <xsl:otherwise>
        <xsl:text>UNKNOWN</xsl:text>
      </xsl:otherwise>
    </xsl:choose>
    <xsl:text>&#x0A;forename: </xsl:text>
    <xsl:choose>
      <xsl:when test="$list/p:forename[$index]">
        <xsl:value-of select="$list/p:forename[$index]"/>
      </xsl:when>
      <xsl:otherwise>
        <xsl:text>UNKNOWN</xsl:text>
      </xsl:otherwise>
    </xsl:choose>
    <xsl:text>&#x0A;&#x0A;</xsl:text>
    <xsl:call-template name="writePersons">
      <xsl:with-param name="index" select="$index + 1"/>
      <xsl:with-param name="list" select="$list"/>
    </xsl:call-template>
  </xsl:if>
</xsl:template>
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much! I like how you used the index to get the fields for each person. A very elegant solution! –  leadgy Jan 23 '12 at 9:53
    
@danleadgy: You might be interested in a simpler and shorter solution :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Jan 23 '12 at 13:42
1  
Is this solution correct? If the data had surname, surname, surname, forename, in that order, this template would assume the forename went with the first surname. I guess the spec is not clear on the rules, but I would suppose it should go with the last surname. But I agree the spec is terrible. –  LarsH Jan 23 '12 at 15:16
    
LarsH: I deduced that this is the correct behaviour from the first revision of the question, where the input looked slightly different. With the current revision it might well be that Dimitre's solution is the correct one. –  flyx Jan 23 '12 at 17:20
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I'll throw my hat in the ring, even though you've accepted one answer... because so far I don't think either of the other solutions is correct (though one matches the given sample output).

Here's my implementation:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
   version="2.0" xmlns:p="p">
   <xsl:output method="text" />

   <xsl:template match="/p:persons">
      <xsl:apply-templates select="*[1]">
         <xsl:with-param name="i" select="1" />
      </xsl:apply-templates>
   </xsl:template>

   <!-- This template is applied to an element whenever it is
      for a new person, i.e. when there is not a preceding
      sibling element belonging to the same person. -->
   <xsl:template match="p:forename | p:surname">
      <xsl:param name="i"/>
      <xsl:variable name="next" select="following-sibling::*[1]"/>
      <xsl:variable name="surname" select="if (self::p:surname) then . else
            if ($next[self::p:surname]) then $next else 'UNKNOWN'"/>
      <xsl:variable name="forename" select="if (self::p:forename) then . else
         if ($next[self::p:forename]) then $next else 'UNKNOWN'"/>
      <xsl:value-of select="concat(if ($i > 1) then '&#10;' else '',
         '--- Person', $i, '---&#10;surname: ',
         $surname, '&#10;forename: ', $forename, '&#10;')"/>

      <xsl:choose>
         <xsl:when test="local-name($next) = local-name(.)">
            <!-- Only one name is supplied. Start processing
            the next sibling as a new person. -->
            <xsl:apply-templates select="following-sibling::*[1]">
               <xsl:with-param name="i" select="$i + 1"/>
            </xsl:apply-templates>
         </xsl:when>
         <xsl:otherwise>
            <!-- Both names are supplied. Skip the second name
            and start processing the sibling after it.-->
            <xsl:apply-templates select="following-sibling::*[2]">
               <xsl:with-param name="i" select="$i + 1"/>
            </xsl:apply-templates>
         </xsl:otherwise>
      </xsl:choose>
   </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

My interpretation of the incomplete spec is this: start from the first forename/surname element. If the first two elements are a forename and a surname (in either order), use both for the first person, and start processing on the third element as a new person.

Otherwise, use the first element and supply "UNKNOWN" for the name not supplied. Then start processing on the next element as a new person.

With this spec interpretation, I'm pretty sure it's impossible to implement correctly without some sort of recursion, because the association of each element with the preceding or following can depend on how the preceding one associated (e.g. forename first?), which can depend on the person before that, etc.

The first sample input above gives the desired output. The second (with tags corrected) gives:

--- Person1---
surname: Surname1
forename: Forename1

--- Person2---
surname: UNKNOWN
forename: Forename2

A fuller example:

<p:persons xmlns:p="p">
   <p:surname>Surname1</p:surname>
   <p:forename>Forename1</p:forename>
   <p:surname>Surname2</p:surname>
   <p:surname>Surname3</p:surname>
   <p:surname>Surname4</p:surname>
   <p:forename>Forename4</p:forename>
   <p:forename>Forename5</p:forename>
   <p:surname>Surname5</p:surname>
</p:persons>

gives

--- Person1---
surname: Surname1
forename: Forename1

--- Person2---
surname: Surname2
forename: UNKNOWN

--- Person3---
surname: Surname3
forename: UNKNOWN

--- Person4---
surname: Surname4
forename: Forename4

--- Person5---
surname: Surname5
forename: Forename5
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Here is a simpler solution (no explicit recursion, no xsl:choose, xsl:otherwise, xsl:call-template, xsl:param, xsl:with-param):

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:p="p">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:param name="pSurnameUnknown">surname: UNKNOWN</xsl:param>

 <xsl:template match=
 "p:surname
    [not(preceding-sibling::*[1][self::p:forename])]">

     --- Person<xsl:text/>
     <xsl:number level="single" count=
     "p:forename|p:surname[not(preceding-sibling::*[1]
                                     [self::p:forename])]"/>
     <xsl:text>---</xsl:text>
     forename: UNKNOWN
     surname: <xsl:value-of select="."/>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="p:forename">

     --- Person<xsl:text/>
     <xsl:number level="single" count=
     "p:forename|p:surname[not(preceding-sibling::*[1]
                                    [self::p:forename])]"/>
     <xsl:text>---</xsl:text>
     forename: <xsl:value-of select="."/>
   <xsl:if test="not(following-sibling::*[1][self::p:surname])">
     <xsl:copy-of select="$pSurnameUnknown"/>
   </xsl:if>
   <xsl:apply-templates mode="second"
        select="following-sibling::*[1][self::p:surname]"/>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="p:surname" mode="second">
     surname: <xsl:value-of select="."/>
 </xsl:template>
 <xsl:template match="p:surname"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on this XML document (the provided one, made well-formed):

<p:persons xmlns:p="p">
    <p:surname>Surname1</p:surname>
    <p:forename>Forename2</p:forename>
    <p:surname>Surname2</p:surname>
</p:persons>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

 --- Person1---
 forename: UNKNOWN
 surname: Surname1

 --- Person2---
 forename: Forename2
 surname: Surname2

Explanation:

  1. Proper use of templates and pattern matching.

  2. Proper use of <xsl:number>

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1  
This solution is functionally different from mine. It expects forename and surename to come in pairs (where either might be missing), while mine matches the nth forename with the nth surname, not matter how forenames and surnames are combined in the list. –  flyx Jan 23 '12 at 14:55
1  
@flyx: If so, your solution is not correct -- please, pay attention to the question. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jan 23 '12 at 15:01
1  
dan leadgy's comment can be interpreted in both ways. Your output differs from the one specified in the question, mine doesn't. I'm not saying you're wrong, I just point out the difference between our answers. –  flyx Jan 23 '12 at 15:18
    
@Dimitre, I'm not sure your output is correct either. The OP said that in the case of input surname, forename, surname, the forename should be output with the 1st person. He also said he wanted "forename: UNKNOWN" or "surname: UNKNOWN" when the relevant name is missing. –  LarsH Jan 23 '12 at 15:23
1  
@LarsH: Thanks, I also noticed this -- I'll add the "unknown" part to the otherwise correct solution. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jan 23 '12 at 15:33
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