Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I return pointer from the function, its value can be accessed individually. But when a loop is used to ouput the value of that pointer variable, wrong value is shown. Where I am making mistake, can't figure it out.

#include <iostream>
#include <conio.h>

int *cal(int *, int*);

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int a[]={5,6,7,8,9};
    int b[]={0,3,5,2,1};
    int *c;
    c=cal(a,b);

    //Wrong outpur here
    /*for(int i=0;i<5;i++)
    {
        cout<<*(c+i);
    }*/

    //Correct output here
    cout<<*(c+0);
    cout<<*(c+1);
    cout<<*(c+2);
    cout<<*(c+3);
    cout<<*(c+4);

return 0;
}   

int *cal(int *d, int *e)
{
    int k[5];
    for(int j=0;j<5;j++)
    {
        *(k+j)=*(d+j)-*(e+j);
    }
    return k;
}
share|improve this question
10  
Turn on your compiler warnings and then read them. –  David Heffernan Jan 23 '12 at 9:17
1  
There are very few, if any, cases where you need to return a pointer from a function. In my experience, the need to return a pointer most often originates from flawed program design. Most often you would return the result through one of the parameters and let the caller worry about where to allocate the data. –  Lundin Jan 23 '12 at 9:31
2  
@Lundin With a few notable exceptions (lookup functions which can fail, for example). On the other hand, returning through one of the parameters should only be used when absolutely necessary, when the profiler says you don't have a choice. Most of the time, the correct solution is to return by value. Which, of course, means not using C style arrays (but that's a good recommendation in general). –  James Kanze Jan 23 '12 at 9:38
    
Many duplicates on SO already, e.g. Error in returning a pointer from a function that points to an array –  Paul R Jan 23 '12 at 9:39
1  
@Lundin In C, of course, you have a lot less options. Historically, C programs would make k static in cal. Which would work in his precise example, but can lead to no end of "surprising" behavior otherwise. Still, everytime the standard C library has to return a pointer, that's what it does. –  James Kanze Jan 23 '12 at 10:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The int k[5] array is created on the stack. So it gets destroyed when it goes out of scope by returning from cal. You could use a third parameter as an output array:

void cal(int *d, int *e, int* k)
{
    for(int j=0;j<5;j++)
    {
        *(k+j)=*(d+j)-*(e+j);
    }
}

call cal like this:

int a[]={5,6,7,8,9};
int b[]={0,3,5,2,1};
int c[5];
cal (a, b, c); // after returning from cal, c will be populated with desired values
share|improve this answer
    
Your are returning a value in a void return function! :) –  another.anon.coward Jan 23 '12 at 9:34
    
@another.anon.coward corrected –  Meysam Jan 23 '12 at 9:35
    
You're still playing with raw pointers, and there's no need for that! –  Johnsyweb Jan 23 '12 at 9:49
    
@Johnsyweb I understand that there is no need to use pointers here. But if the asker wants to use pointers, this is the way to go :) –  Meysam Jan 23 '12 at 10:42
    
Perhaps the OP wants to use pointers due to not knowing there are alternative approaches. I like the advice in this Meta answer. –  Johnsyweb Jan 23 '12 at 21:20

You are returning a pointer to a local variable.

k is created on the stack. When cal() exits the stack is unwound and that memory is free'd. Referencing that memory afterwards leads to undefined behaviour (as explained beautifully here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/6445794/78845).

Your C++ compiler should warn you about this and you should heed these warnings.

For what it's worth, here is how I'd implement this in C++:

#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>

int main()
{
    int a[] = {5, 6, 7, 8, 9};
    int b[] = {0, 3, 5, 2, 1};
    int c[5];
    std::transform (a, a + 5, b, c, std::minus<int>());
    std::copy(c, c + 5, std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, ", "));
}

See it run!

share|improve this answer
3  
int k[5] will be destroyed. –  RvdK Jan 23 '12 at 9:17
    
@PoweRoy: Shouldn't it be "may be" destroyed? It is not guaranteed to be destroyed, is it? It is an illegal access for sure though... –  another.anon.coward Jan 23 '12 at 9:36
1  
@another.anon.coward: It will be destroyed, otherwise RAII wouldn't work. Whether anything else uses that memory can't be guaranteed. –  Johnsyweb Jan 23 '12 at 10:00
    
@Johnsyweb: Thanks for that bit of info! –  another.anon.coward Jan 23 '12 at 10:03

As others have pointed out, you're returning a pointer to a local variable, which is undefined behavior. The real problem, however, is that you need to return an array, and C style arrays are broken. Replace your arrays with std::vector<int>, forget about the pointers (because you're dealing with values), and the code will work.

share|improve this answer
    
std::vector (or even valarray) isn't really required here but you're right, there's no need for pointers. –  Johnsyweb Jan 23 '12 at 9:49
    
@Johnsyweb For his particular example, std::vector<int> is the obvious and correct solution. –  James Kanze Jan 23 '12 at 10:04
    
In C++11 with initialser lists I may agree with you, but "correct" is subjective. I think, for example, that the code provided in my answer is "correct" mut makes no use of containers from the Standard Library. –  Johnsyweb Jan 23 '12 at 10:12
2  
@Johnsyweb Agreed (although I'd use std::begin and std::end). As long as no functions are involved that take or return arrays (only iterators), you're fine. (Or maybe not: using a back_inserter into an std::vector<int> avoids any risk of missizing the target array.) –  James Kanze Jan 23 '12 at 10:18
1  
@Johnsyweb Before C++11, you'd use the begin() and end() from your personal toolkit. C++11 didn't invent these; it just standardize something everyone was doing already. –  James Kanze Jan 23 '12 at 10:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.