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There is a shell script which is supposed to process an incoming text file.

This text file contains strings split on multiple lines, and each string is present more than once.

The shell script needs to read this text file and output the String and count of each string.

Consider the text file is:

Tim

tim

Mark

MARk

Allen

ALLen

allEN

The output should be like this:

Tim appears 2 times

Mark appears 2 times

Allen appears 3 times

Right now, I am able to print the occurrence of strings, but that gets repeated the number of times the string occurs, that is "Tim appears 2 times" gets printed twice. I was trying to replace a string with NULL as soon as I count its occurrence, but for some reason, the sed is not working, coz maybe I am not invoking it at the right place (or in right way)

 #!/bin/bash

INPUT_FILE="$1"
declare -a LIST_CHARS

if [ $# -ne 1 ]
then
        echo "Usage: $0 <file_name>"
        exit 1
fi


if [ ! -f $INPUT_FILE ]
then
        echo "$INPUT_FILE does not exists. Please specify correct file name"
        exit 2
fi

while read line
do
        while read i
        do
                echo $line
                count=`grep -i $line | wc -l`
                echo "String $line appears $count times"
        done < $INPUT_FILE

done < $INPUT_FILE
share|improve this question
    
post the source code –  Balaswamy Vaddeman Jan 23 '12 at 10:08
    
consider accepting the answer given by William HERE, it is the superior answer. –  SiegeX Jan 24 '12 at 1:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The classic awk solution is something like:

$ awk 'NF{ count[ toupper( $0 ) ]++} 
    END{ for ( name in count ) { print name " appears " count[ name ] " times" };
}' input
share|improve this answer
    
+1, though instead of /./ you can use NF that would skip blank lines just fine. –  jaypal Jan 23 '12 at 14:32
    
@jaypal Good suggestion. And that handles lines with whitespace better. Edited. –  William Pursell Jan 23 '12 at 14:37
    
this should be the accepted answer. –  SiegeX Jan 24 '12 at 1:09

You can also use sort and uniq with flags to ignore case:

sort -f FILE | uniq -ic

Simple sed command can change the output format to the specified one:

s/^ *\([0-9]\+\) \(.*\)/\2 appears \1 times/
share|improve this answer
    
Great one-liner :-) sort -f FILE | uniq -ic | sed 's/^ *\([0-9]\+\) \(.*\)/\2 appears \1 times/' –  Nikos Alexandris May 5 '13 at 8:59

Assuming data.txt contains your word Following script will do.

while read line
do  
    uc=$(echo $line | tr [a-z] [A-Z] | tr -d ' ')
    echo  $uc $(grep -i "$uc" strs.txt | wc -l)
done< data.txt | sort | uniq

Output.

31
ALLEN 6
MARK 4
MOKADDIM 1
SHIPLU 1
TIM 4

Another option is

sort -f data.txt | uniq -i -c  | while read num word
do  
    echo $(echo $word|tr [a-z] [A-Z])  appeard  $num times
done

Note: I see your text file contains blank lines. So the 31 in the output contains the number of blank lines.

share|improve this answer
    
This is O(n²) if data.txt is a copy of strs.txt –  Benoit Jan 23 '12 at 10:28
    
@Benoit- Yes, but I also cannot think of a way in which I can achieve the objective in a single iteration of the file. –  Incognito Jan 23 '12 at 10:32
    
@Benoit: My solution should be faster. –  choroba Jan 23 '12 at 10:35
    
@choroba Still your solution needs iteration for printing. I have added that. –  shiplu.mokadd.im Jan 23 '12 at 10:36
    
@choroba What would be your sed command? Can you elaborate your answer with the sed command too? –  Incognito Jan 23 '12 at 10:37
for i in `sort filename |uniq -c``
do
    # --if to print data as u like--
done
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