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How can I most efficiently count the number of bits required by an integer (log base 2) in C#? For example:

int bits = 1 + log2(100);

=> bits == 7
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5  
graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html ... choose your poison :) –  Filip Navara Jan 23 '12 at 10:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Efficiency in terms of lines of code, or runtime execution speed?

Code's easy: Math.log(n, 2).

Runtime speed's a little trickier, but you can do it with a kind of 'binary search':

int bits = 1;
for (int b = 16; b >=1; b/=2)
{
  int s = 1 << b;
  if (n >= s) { n>>=b; bits+=b; }
}

I'm not 100% certain I've got the logic right there, but hopefully the idea's clear. There might be some overheads in the .NET VM, but in principle it should be faster.

The 16 in the for loop initialializer is based on half the number of bits needed for an int. If you're working with longs, start it at 32, etc.

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That logic doesn't work, as the number that you can represent with a specific number of bits can't be added. 2^24 isn't 2^16 + 2^8 but 2^16 * 2^8. –  Guffa Jan 23 '12 at 11:22
    
Well, that's not entirely true, it's not adding 2^16+2^8, it's adding 16+8, which SHOULD work, but there's an error somewhere else I can't quite put my finger on how to fix at the moment; I'll edit when I do. The principle of a 'binary search' should work though, if you can get the logic at each step right. –  Flynn1179 Jan 23 '12 at 12:23
    
Fixed it; I had got the logic slightly wrong, and you need to start with 1 bit, not 0. –  Flynn1179 Jan 23 '12 at 12:41
    
the code is not directly adding 2^16+2^8, but subtracting each from the number, in the n-=s; statement. The bitmask should be formed from b-1 rather than b, and instead of subtracting s from the number, you would need to discard the least b bits of the number: int s = 1 << (b - 1); if (n >= s) { n >>=b; bits+=b; }. –  Guffa Jan 23 '12 at 12:49
    
If you start from 1, then the number 0 still needs one bit. –  Guffa Jan 23 '12 at 12:50

You can simply count how many times you have to remove bits until the value is zero:

int bits = 0;
while (n > 0) {
  bits++;
  n >>= 1;
}

More efficient for large numbers, you can count groups of bits first:

int bits = 0;
while (n > 255) {
  bits += 8;
  n >>= 8;
}
while (n > 0) {
  bits++;
  n >>= 1;
}

Edit:

The most efficient method would be to use the binary steps that Flynn1179 suggested (upvoted for the inspiration :), but expanding the loop into hard coded checks. This is at least twice as fast as the method above, but also more code:

int bits = 0;
if (n > 32767) {
  n >>= 16;
  bits += 16;
}
if (n > 127) {
  n >>= 8;
  bits += 8;
}
if (n > 7) {
  n >>= 4;
  bits += 4;
}
if (n > 1) {
  n >>= 2;
  bits += 2;
}
if (n > 0) {
  bits++;
}
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How about negative numbers? They would appear to be pretty cheap :) –  Erno de Weerd Jan 23 '12 at 10:31
    
Negatives always need max; the top bit's set. –  Flynn1179 Jan 23 '12 at 10:33
    
@Emo: Good point. This only works for positive numbers. To handle negative numbers just add a if (n < 0) { bits = 32; } else { ... } around the loop. –  Guffa Jan 23 '12 at 10:41
2  
Negative numbers don't have a logarithm anyway.. –  harold Jan 23 '12 at 10:49
    
Sure they do; log(-5) = log(5)+i pi, for example. –  Zéychin Jan 24 '12 at 20:04

Slight improvement to Guffa's answer... Since the amount you are adding to the result is always a power of two using bit operations can produce slight improvement on some architectures. Also since our context is bit patterns it is slightly more readable to use hexadecimal. In this case it is useful to shift the arithmetic by a power of 2.

int bits = 0;

if (n > 0xffff) {
  n >>= 16;
  bits = 0x10;
}

if (n > 0xff) {
  n >>= 8;
  bits |= 0x8;
}

if (n > 0xf) {
  n >>= 4;
  bits |= 0x4;
}

if (n > 0x3) {
  n >>= 2;
  bits |= 0x2;
}

if (n > 0x1) {
  bits |= 0x1;
}

Further a check for n==0 should be added since the above will yield a result of 0 and Log(0) is undefined (regardless of base).

In ARM assembly this algorithm produces very compact code as the branch after comparison can be eliminated with conditional instructions which avoids pipeline flushing. For Example:

if (n > 0xff) {
   n >>= 8;
   bits |= 0x8;
}

becomes (let R0 = n, R1 = bits)

CMP R0, $0xff
MOVHI R0, R0, LSR $8
ORRHI R1, R1, $0x8
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