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I need to call the initialize method of the parent class, from inside the inherited MyModel-class, instead of completely overwriting it as I am doing today.

How could I do this?

Here's what my code looks right now:

BaseModel = Backbone.Model.extend({
    initialize: function(attributes, options) {
        // Do parent stuff stuff
    }
});

MyModel = BaseModel.extend({
    initialize: function() {
        // Invoke BaseModel.initialize();
        // Continue doing specific stuff for this child-class.
    },
});
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7 Answers 7

up vote 33 down vote accepted
MyModel = BaseModel.extend({
    initialize: function() {
        MyModel.__super__.initialize.apply(this, arguments);
        // Continue doing specific stuff for this child-class.
    },
});
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Hi Raynos - That throws too much recursion error in console.. –  Industrial Jan 23 '12 at 13:05
1  
@Industrial then it's doing something silly. Try this.__super__.initialize.apply(this, arguments); –  Raynos Jan 23 '12 at 13:29
1  
__ super __ is not intended to use it directly, as the underscored name implies. –  Yury Tarabanko Jan 23 '12 at 13:49
1  
@YuryTarabanko either works. The __super__ solution is more elegant because it doesn't require changing when you rename BaseModel. –  Raynos Jan 23 '12 at 14:50
4  
documentcloud.github.com/backbone/#Model-extend Brief aside on super: JavaScript does not provide a simple way to call super — the function of the same name defined higher on the prototype chain. If you override a core function like set, or save, and you want to invoke the parent object's implementation, you'll have to explicitly call it... –  Yury Tarabanko Jan 23 '12 at 15:09
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Try

MyModel = BaseModel.extend({
    initialize: function() {
        BaseModel.prototype.initialize.apply(this, arguments);
        // Continue doing specific stuff for this child-class.
    },
});
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this appears to work even in the presence of _.bindAll(this) calls, which render the __super__ property of the constructor undefined. –  sweaver2112 Jan 30 '13 at 17:53
    
better than using __super__ has the underscores suggests a private member –  Marcel Falliere Jun 11 at 14:24
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This worked for me, when I was trying to inherit among my models:

MyModel.prototype.initialize.call(this, options);

Referenced from http://documentcloud.github.com/backbone/#Model-extend

Thanks.

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I think it'd be

MyModel = BaseModel.extend({
    initialize: function() {
        this.constructor.__super__.initialize.call(this);
        // Continue doing specific stuff for this child-class.
    },
});
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It's this.__super__.initialize.call(this); –  Raynos Jan 23 '12 at 11:39
    
Both this.__super__.prototype.initialize.call(this); and this.__super__.initialize.call(this); throws this.__super__ is undefined in Firebug. –  Industrial Jan 23 '12 at 13:07
    
none of them is working :( –  Umesh Patil Jan 23 '12 at 13:47
1  
As of may/2013, this is the correct answer. –  gustavohenke May 24 '13 at 12:57
2  
I wanted to pass arguments to the initialize function, and this is the only version that worked for me this.constructor.__super__.initialize.call(this,arguments); –  Khalid Dabjan Jul 6 '13 at 12:42
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this seems to be almost a duplicate of Super in Backbone, so you want something like this:

Backbone.Model.prototype.initialize.call(this);
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Similar to @wheresrhys, but I would use apply instead of call in case BaseModel.initialize is expecting arguments. I try to avoid processing the attributes map that can be passed to a Backbone Model upon initialization, but if the BaseModel were actually a View or a Collection then I might want to set options.

var MyModel = BaseModel.extend({
    initialize: function() {
        this.constructor.__super__.initialize.apply(this, arguments);
        // Continue doing specific stuff for this child-class.
    },
});
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FWIW Jeremy Ashkenas states that __super__ is not intended to be used directly. –  MikeSchinkel Jul 26 '13 at 18:02
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You might consider rewriting your code using functional inheritance.

var BackBone=function(){
    var that={};

    that.m1=function(){

   };
   return that;

};

var MyModel=function(){

 var that=BackBone();
 var original_m1=that.m1;

//overriding of m1
 that.m1=function(){
    //call original m1
 original_m1();
 //custom code for m1
  };
};
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i doubt rewriting backbone is in order here :) we got to manage with the structure backbone gives us, and there are far better solutions than rewriting all this, like the super is more than enough. –  Sander Jan 23 '12 at 12:04
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