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NOTE: This appears to be a limit in the "javac" program.

I have Java 6 code that needs to be built for a Java 5 JVM. My previous work with the javac ant target (both with the JDK compiler and with ecj) led me to believe that it would simply be a matter of setting source and target for javac. Hence this pom.xml fragment:

<plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>2.3.2</version>
    <configuration>
        <source>1.6</source>
        <target>1.5</target>
    </configuration>
</plugin>

which works as expected from within Eclipse 3.7 with Maven support. Unfortunately, running Maven directly from the command line give me

javac: source release 1.6 requires target release 1.6

which is the same as generated by javac -source 1.6 -target 1.5. To clarify, this is the official OpenJDK 6 for Ubuntu

x@JENKINS:~$ javac -version
javac 1.6.0_20
x@JENKINS:~$ javac -source 1.6 -target 1.5
javac: source release 1.6 requires target release 1.6
x@JENKINS:~$

The official Oracle Java 7 JDK for Windows show the same behavior.

Note: I do not want to build against Java 5 libraries or anything. Just that the active javac generates Java 5 compatible bytecode.

How do I get what I want while still being compatible with the Eclipse Maven plugin?

(EDIT: In addition to the @Override I also want to compile against the JAX-WS libraries in Java 6 when used, but still generated Java 5 byte code - I can then add the JAX-WS libraries deliberately in the web container when deploying to a Java 5 installation)


EDIT: It turns out that maven-compiler-plugin can be told to use another compiler, and the Eclipse compiler can do this:

        <plugin>
            <!-- Using the eclipse compiler allows for different source and target, 
                which is a good thing (outweighing that this is a rarely used combination, 
                and most people use javac) This should also allow us to run maven builds 
                on a JRE and not a JDK. -->

            <!-- Note that initial experiments with an earlier version of maven-compiler-plugin 
                showed that the eclipse compiler bundled with that gave incorrect lines in 
                the debug information. By using a newer version of the plexus-compiler-eclipse 
                plugin this is hopefully less of an issue. If not we must also bundle a newer 
                version of the eclipse compiler itself. -->

            <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
            <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
            <version>3.0</version>
            <configuration>
                <source>1.6</source>
                <target>1.5</target>
                <debug>true</debug>
                <optimize>false</optimize>
                <fork>true</fork>
                <compilerId>eclipse</compilerId>
            </configuration>
            <dependencies>
                <dependency>
                    <groupId>org.codehaus.plexus</groupId>
                    <artifactId>plexus-compiler-eclipse</artifactId>
                    <version>2.1</version>
                </dependency>
            </dependencies>
        </plugin>

which compiles the class to Java 1.5 bytecode without complaints. This is also supported "out of the box" for m2e for Eclipse Java EE 4.2.2.

share|improve this question
    
I hope this guild will give some hints maven.apache.org/guides/mini/guide-building-jdk14-on-jdk15.html –  Sergey Benner Jan 23 '12 at 11:43
    
Note: Question edited to clarify what I want, and that I still need to be Eclipse compatible. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jan 23 '12 at 11:55
    
@ThorbjørnRavnAndersen I'll give you another chance then. how was the javactask configured? According to the docs the source parameter is ignored for most of the compilers: "Value of the -source command-line switch; will be ignored by all implementations prior to javac1.4 (or modern when Ant is not running in a 1.3 VM), gcj and jikes." –  Peter Liljenberg Feb 13 '12 at 16:51
    
@PeterLiljenberg that is for ant tasks, not maven tasks. I do not know if compiling "outside" the Maven engine looses any kind of information or reporting back. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Mar 12 '12 at 9:41

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The limitation is in javac. The solution is to tell maven to use another compiler. See question for details.

share|improve this answer
2  
Note: The javadoc byte code interpreter crashes on byte code generated by the Eclipse compiler. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Nov 19 '13 at 13:12

It seems if you want to do cross compilation you need to supply a couple of extra arguments -bootclasspath and -extdirs, although I believe you only need the first. For using Javac and example can be found here with an explanation of the additional options here (Cross-Compilation Options section).

You would then need to configure these options for your maven-compiler-plugin. From what I understand you need to set to plugin to fork so that it will use the compiler arguments rather than the built in compiler. You can find a listing of all the options here

 <build>
        <plugins>
            <plugin>
                <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
                <configuration>
                    <source>1.6</source>
                    <target>1.5</target>
                    <fork>true</fork>
                    <compilerArguments>
                        <bootclasspath>${1.5.0jdk}\lib\rt.jar</bootclasspath>
                   </compilerArguments>
               </configuration>
           </plugin>
        ....
       </plugins>
   </build>
share|improve this answer
    
It is fine to build against the Java 6 runtime library. That is not my problem. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jan 23 '12 at 12:05

I believe you need to set -bootclasspath as well so that javac compiles against JDK 1.5 bootstrap classes.

Try:

javac -source 1.6 -target 1.5 -bootclasspath /path/to/jdk1.5/lib/rt.jar -extdirs "" Foo.java

UPDATE:

Try removing the -source option, but keep the -target option.

I just tested it out:

# no source, only target => COMPILES to 1.5
$ javac -target 1.5 Foo.java
$ javap -v  Foo | grep version
  minor version: 0
  major version: 49

# no source, no target => COMPILES to 1.6
$ javac Foo.java
$ javap -v  Foo | grep version
  minor version: 0
  major version: 50

# both source and target => ERROR
$ javac -source 1.6 -target 1.5 Foo.java
javac: source release 1.6 requires target release 1.6

$ javac -version
javac 1.6.0_21
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is not that the classes are wrong, but that javac complain and do not start. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jan 23 '12 at 11:41
    
@ThorbjørnRavnAndersen I've updated my answer. –  dogbane Jan 23 '12 at 11:51
    
Your revised answer agrees with my own experiments. Now, how do I make the maven compiler plugin do this, while still be compatible with the Maven plugin in Eclipse? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jan 23 '12 at 11:52

What JDK are you using? Judging from the example here, if you were using were using JDK 1.6, then -source=1.6 -target=1.5 should work.

As an experiment, try running javac (not mvn) from the command line to see if it allows -source=1.6 -target=1.5 ...


Dogbane is correct that you should use -bootclasspath to compile against the appropriate version of rt.jar. However, that won't cause the build to fail. On the contrary, the build may succeed when it should fail; i.e. when your code depends on a Java 1.6 specific class or method. (And, it is possible that mvn will get the bootclasspath right for you.)

share|improve this answer
    
The example only shows -target. Also I do not need cross-compilation, just that the bytecode generated is valid for a Java 5 JVM. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jan 23 '12 at 11:48
    
I do not need the bootclasspath changed. Javac fails when validating the arguments. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jan 23 '12 at 12:01
    
@ThorbjørnRavnAndersen - so how are you going to be sure that you don't accidentally use a Java 1.6 class / method? –  Stephen C Jan 24 '12 at 5:57
    
this is ensured by testing later with an actual Java 5 JVM. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jan 24 '12 at 9:50

What Java 6 language features are you using that are not present in Java 5? As far as I can tell, the only "feature" that's been added to the language is the use of the @Override annotation in interfaces. Otherwise, Java 6 and Java 5 are source-compatible. What happens when you use:

<source>1.5</source>
<target>1.5</target>

in your Maven build file?

share|improve this answer
1  
The @Override annotation requirement on interface implementations is exactly the desired feature here. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jan 23 '12 at 11:55
1  
and here is more to that stackoverflow.com/questions/2335655/… –  Sergey Benner Jan 23 '12 at 12:01
    
... and also that the JAX-WS come with Java 6, and is an optional download in Java 5. I want to have code which will run under a plain Java 6 but also can run under Java 5 with extra libraries. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Mar 12 '12 at 8:36

The real question is thus to use @Override in source files that need to be compiled in Java 1.5 class files.

javac -source 1.5 -target 1.5 aFileWithOverride.java

will do just that. In jdk 7, this will lead to a warning

[options] bootstrap class path not set in conjunction with -source 1.5

which is absent in jdk 6.

To get rid of this warning a special boot class jar can be created by adding the java 6 (or higher) java.lang.annotation package to a java 5 rt.jar.

share|improve this answer

I had the same error when I upgraded my IntelliJ IDE, it was fixed with the replacement of 1.5 with 1.6 as below.

       <plugin>
            <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
            <configuration>
                <source>1.6</source>
                <target>1.6</target>
            </configuration>
        </plugin>
share|improve this answer
    
The OP needs to maintain 1.6 java code (source = 1.6) while compiling it for java 1.5 (target) - in other words -- to make his 1.6 source run on 1.5 JRE. Your solution compiles for 1.6 JRE version –  Ivaylo Slavov Feb 13 at 11:59

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