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I have a couple of classes that are singletons so I tried to create a parent BaseClass with method GetInstance(params) and derived classes, that should implement this method and return instances of theiselfs (so I dont have to cast them)... as they are singletons the method should be static, but its not allowed to override static methods. What would be the best approach to code it? sample code what i wanted:

  public class Base {

    public static virtual T GetInstance<T>() where T : class;
  }


  public class Derived {
    Derived instance;

    public static override T GetInstance<T>() where T : typeOf(this){
      if (instance == null) {
        instance = new Derived();
        }
      return instance;
    }
  }

in the code outside of this i want to call

Derived.GetInstance().SomeDerivedMethod()

not

(Derived.GetInstance() as Derived).SomeDerivedMethod() and not
new Derived().getInstance().SomeDerivedMethod()

I know this is not good, and i have lack of experience with the T type too, so any advices are welcomed. thanks

EDIT:

Or if it is possible somehow define the GetInstance() method in Base, so the derived class does not need to ovwerride it, but it will return the instance of class from where it was called... Derived.GetInstance() will return instance of Derived

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1  
What purpose should this class have? It is likely that an IoC container would be more appropriate. –  Groo Jan 23 '12 at 14:05
    
I will have more singletons, therefore i wanted to pull up the logic for creating instances in way that a static inherited method from parent could always return a instance of type from where it was called (even if it is from descendant) –  Zavael Jan 23 '12 at 14:58
    
here is similar discussion codeguru.com/forum/showthread.php?t=376943 and it looks like there is no way to force the descendant to be singletons, looks like i wanted something weird.. :( –  Zavael Jan 23 '12 at 15:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use a Dictionary<Type, Object> for your singletones. The method below requires each type to implement the constructor private. Of course you could also make a check in each of the derived classes if there is already a instance of the class in the singletones dictionary. This would even avoid somebody to use the Activator to create a instance.

Not tested:

public class Base {
    static Dictionary<Type, Object> _Singletones = new Dictionary<Type, Object>();
    public static T GetInstance<T>() where T : class {
        Type t = typeof(T);
        if (_Singletones.ContainsKey(t))
             return _Singletones[t] as T;
        else {
            // Create instance by calling private constructor and return it
            T result = Activator.CreateInstance(t, true) as T;
            _Singletones.Add(t, result);
            return result;
        }
    }
}
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This is ok, although a static method like this should be made thread safe. –  Groo Jan 23 '12 at 14:04
    
yes man! its almost it... but how could I get the type not from the parameter but from the calling class so instead of Base.GetInstance<Derived>() = Derived.GetInstance<Derived>() i should call Base.GetInstance() which returns Base and Derived.get.. which returns Derived –  Zavael Jan 23 '12 at 14:16
    
@Groo You are right, but this could nasty when you have performance critical code( e.g. when accessing the method many times ). Maybe working with 2 dictionaries( Swapping ) would improve performance then. –  Felix K. Jan 23 '12 at 14:20
    
@Zavael I don't think this is possible. You need to access it with Base.GetInstance<Dervied>(). ( Without base when working in a dervied class ) –  Felix K. Jan 23 '12 at 14:21
    
@Felix: not sure what you mean by swapping. If it needs to be accessed from different threads, it should be thread safe, unless all possible values are instantiated at startup and the dictionary is used as readonly (and nothing enforces that right now). –  Groo Jan 23 '12 at 14:41

Try the Abstract Factory design pattern. Maybe other creational design patterns may fit too.

You need to enforce the "singleton-ness" on factory level, and then the call may look like:

FooFactory.GetBarInstance().SomeDerivedMethod();
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the factory does not know, which instance to create of the derived classes... –  Zavael Jan 23 '12 at 13:10
    
@Zavael: that's why it's called abstract. If you need a Foo, you use a FooFactory. It can implement a generic interface, but each factory instantiates its own type. –  Groo Jan 23 '12 at 14:12

its not an real answer but maybe its nice to know anyway. Lazy

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1  
+1 thanks for the lazysingleton1 double check :) the lambda version i could not use as i have not one instance, but a dictionary of singletons –  Zavael Jan 24 '12 at 10:08

Why not simply declare the method as non-generic and use the derived type directly:

public class Derived {
  Derived instance;

  public static Derived GetInstance() {
    if (instance == null) {
      instance = new Derived();
    }
    return instance;
  }
}
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yes it is a way. i wanted to force any derived class to implement the singleton method GetInstance() through the parent Base.. –  Zavael Jan 23 '12 at 12:54
1  
You cannot force implementation of a static method in C# –  Jonas H Jan 23 '12 at 13:02
    
yes i know, thats why i asked for advices, if it is possible at all to achieve what i want :) –  Zavael Jan 23 '12 at 13:07
4  
@Zavael - it depends. It is not possible with the textbook implementation of singleton using a static method. But a much better way to enforce singleton-ness is to use IoC and let the container manage the lifetime of your instances. It should be trivial in most frameworks to declare that all subclasses of a given class have singleton lifetime. –  Jonas H Jan 23 '12 at 13:33
    
thanks, +1 for the ioc that was smthng new for me :) –  Zavael Jan 24 '12 at 10:05

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