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This code

var re = /(\w+)\s(\w+)/;
var str = "John Smith";
var newstr = str.replace(re, "$2, $1")

and this code

var re = /(.+)\s(.+)/;
var str = "John Smith";
var newstr = str.replace(re, "$2, $1")

does exactly the same thing.

Are there any key differences between . (dot) and \w metacharacters?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

. matches any non-newline character.

\w matches a word character, i.e. is equivalent to [A-Za-z0-9_].

Using \w might seem the right way to go, but can go a bit wrong when dealing with names, as can be seen here:

var str = "Hans-Kristian Whistler";

var re = /(\w+)\s(\w+)/;
var newstr = str.replace(re, "$2, $1");
// result: Hans-Whistler, Kristian

var re = /(.+)\s(.+)/;
var newstr = str.replace(re, "$2, $1");
// result: Whistler, Hans-Kristian

See also:

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why does it give "Hans-Whistler, Kristian"?? –  DrStrangeLove Jan 23 '12 at 14:59
    
- is neither alphanumeric nor underscore! Why is it matched?? –  DrStrangeLove Jan 23 '12 at 15:17
    
@DrStrangeLove - is not matched. It matches Kristian Whistler and corrects that, ignoring the Hans--part. –  Sebastian Paaske Tørholm Jan 23 '12 at 15:24
    
Thanks a lot!! :) –  DrStrangeLove Jan 23 '12 at 15:29

A dot matches every character except for newlines,
\w matches all alphanumeric characters, and the underscore (in JavaScript).

So, . = [^\n\r] , and \w = [a-zA-Z0-9_].

If you want a literal which matches every character, use:

  • [\S\s] (all non-whitespace (\S) and whitespace (\s) characters = all characters)
  • [\D\d] (all non-digit (\D) and all digits (\d) characters = all characters)
  • [\W\w] (all non-word characters and all word characters = all characters)
  • etc.

For more information, see MDN: Regular expressions.

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does \w match newlines?? –  DrStrangeLove Jan 23 '12 at 13:34
1  
@DrStrangeLove No. As far as I know, a newline is not an alphanumeric character or underscore. –  Rob W Jan 23 '12 at 13:35
    
Thank you!!! :)) –  DrStrangeLove Jan 23 '12 at 15:34

\w match alphanumeric characters and _ but no whitespaces

var re = /(\w+)\s(\w+)/;
var str = "John Herbert Smith";
var newstr = str.replace(re, ">$2<, >$1<");

output:

>Herbert<, >John< Smith

. match everything except the linebreak

var re = /(.+)\s(.+)/;
var str = "John Herbert Smith";
var newstr = str.replace(re, ">$2<, >$1<");

output

>Smith<, >John Herbert<
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Here you can read about dot and \w

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Check out the docs.

About \w:

Matches any alphanumeric character including the underscore. Equivalent to [A-Za-z0-9_].

About .:

Matches any single character except the newline character.

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