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I've a string of words :

string = "Ruby web framework"

How can I write a regex matching all the possible word permutation ?

All the following strings have to match :

ruby web framework
web framework ruby
framework ruby web

ruby framework web
framework web ruby
web ruby framework 
share|improve this question
3  
I'm not 100% convinced your ultimate problem statement is best solved with a regex. You also don't state if a permutation must contain all words; if so, three [foo|bar|baz]+ clauses is likely enough. But is this really the end goal? Or are you trying to do fuzzy text searching/matching? –  Dave Newton Jan 23 '12 at 13:58
1  
should this regex match ruby ruby ruby and other permutations like this? –  Alex Kliuchnikau Jan 23 '12 at 13:59
    
@Dave Newton: the permutation must be ordered starting from those containing all words ..., and degrading eventually with less matches. Last resoult could match just one word –  Luca G. Soave Jan 23 '12 at 14:23
    
@Alex Kliuchnikau: "ruby ruby ruby" should not match ( or better, they have to match as they were just a word: "ruby". –  Luca G. Soave Jan 23 '12 at 14:23
    
So we also need regexes for 'ruby web' and 'web ruby', and 'ruby' etc.? –  Linuxios Jan 23 '12 at 14:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just to point out that using a regex isn't the fastest path to this goal:

pp string.split.permutation.to_a

[["Ruby", "web", "framework"],
 ["Ruby", "framework", "web"],
 ["web", "Ruby", "framework"],
 ["web", "framework", "Ruby"],
 ["framework", "Ruby", "web"],
 ["framework", "web", "Ruby"]]

Sigh... OK... here is how I'd do it:

require 'pp'

string = "Ruby web framework"
strings_to_search = string.split.permutation.map{ |p| 'Lorem, ' + p.join(' ') + ' consectetur'}

strings_to_search << 'Lorem, Ruby consectetur' 
strings_to_search << 'Lorem, Ruby web consectetur' 
strings_to_search << 'Lorem, Ruby Ruby Ruby' 

pp strings_to_search.map{ |p| p.scan(Regexp.union(string.split)) }

And what's happening:

1.9.2-p290 :001 >     require 'pp'
true
1.9.2-p290 :002 > 
1.9.2-p290 :003 >       string = "Ruby web framework"
"Ruby web framework"
1.9.2-p290 :004 >     strings_to_search = string.split.permutation.map{ |p| 'Lorem, ' + p.join(' ') + ' consectetur'}
[
    [0] "Lorem, Ruby web framework consectetur",
    [1] "Lorem, Ruby framework web consectetur",
    [2] "Lorem, web Ruby framework consectetur",
    [3] "Lorem, web framework Ruby consectetur",
    [4] "Lorem, framework Ruby web consectetur",
    [5] "Lorem, framework web Ruby consectetur"
]
1.9.2-p290 :005 > 
1.9.2-p290 :006 >       strings_to_search << 'Lorem, Ruby consectetur' 
[
    [0] "Lorem, Ruby web framework consectetur",
    [1] "Lorem, Ruby framework web consectetur",
    [2] "Lorem, web Ruby framework consectetur",
    [3] "Lorem, web framework Ruby consectetur",
    [4] "Lorem, framework Ruby web consectetur",
    [5] "Lorem, framework web Ruby consectetur",
    [6] "Lorem, Ruby consectetur"
]
1.9.2-p290 :007 >     strings_to_search << 'Lorem, Ruby web consectetur' 
[
    [0] "Lorem, Ruby web framework consectetur",
    [1] "Lorem, Ruby framework web consectetur",
    [2] "Lorem, web Ruby framework consectetur",
    [3] "Lorem, web framework Ruby consectetur",
    [4] "Lorem, framework Ruby web consectetur",
    [5] "Lorem, framework web Ruby consectetur",
    [6] "Lorem, Ruby consectetur",
    [7] "Lorem, Ruby web consectetur"
]
1.9.2-p290 :008 >     strings_to_search << 'Lorem, Ruby Ruby Ruby' 
[
    [0] "Lorem, Ruby web framework consectetur",
    [1] "Lorem, Ruby framework web consectetur",
    [2] "Lorem, web Ruby framework consectetur",
    [3] "Lorem, web framework Ruby consectetur",
    [4] "Lorem, framework Ruby web consectetur",
    [5] "Lorem, framework web Ruby consectetur",
    [6] "Lorem, Ruby consectetur",
    [7] "Lorem, Ruby web consectetur",
    [8] "Lorem, Ruby Ruby Ruby"
]
1.9.2-p290 :009 > 
1.9.2-p290 :010 >       pp strings_to_search.map{ |p| p.scan(Regexp.union(string.split)) }
[["Ruby", "web", "framework"],
 ["Ruby", "framework", "web"],
 ["web", "Ruby", "framework"],
 ["web", "framework", "Ruby"],
 ["framework", "Ruby", "web"],
 ["framework", "web", "Ruby"],
 ["Ruby"],
 ["Ruby", "web"],
 ["Ruby", "Ruby", "Ruby"]]
[
    [0] [
        [0] "Ruby",
        [1] "web",
        [2] "framework"
    ],
    [1] [
        [0] "Ruby",
        [1] "framework",
        [2] "web"
    ],
    [2] [
        [0] "web",
        [1] "Ruby",
        [2] "framework"
    ],
    [3] [
        [0] "web",
        [1] "framework",
        [2] "Ruby"
    ],
    [4] [
        [0] "framework",
        [1] "Ruby",
        [2] "web"
    ],
    [5] [
        [0] "framework",
        [1] "web",
        [2] "Ruby"
    ],
    [6] [
        [0] "Ruby"
    ],
    [7] [
        [0] "Ruby",
        [1] "web"
    ],
    [8] [
        [0] "Ruby",
        [1] "Ruby",
        [2] "Ruby"
    ]
]

Once you have the hits, THEN you filter out the ones that shouldn't be accepted. Don't try to do it all in regex, because you will make a pattern that becomes too unwieldy and is a maintenance nightmare.

share|improve this answer
    
great, but then I need something to match any array (or a part of it) with a given text. I asked for regex, to check if a combination of words exist in a given phrase or not ... –  Luca G. Soave Jan 23 '12 at 18:41
    
@LucaG.Soave, I broke it down for you. –  the Tin Man Jan 23 '12 at 18:59
    
impressive .... –  Luca G. Soave Jan 23 '12 at 19:29

This works:

   theRegex=Regexp.new("("+(Regexp.union(str.split(' ')).inspect.chop[1..-1])+"){#{str.split(' ').length}}")

The generated regex is /(ruby|web|development){3}/. Is this what you want?

share|improve this answer
    
"This (may) work"? DId you try it? Can you show results to the OP? –  the Tin Man Jan 23 '12 at 16:23
    
I did try it. I'll edit. –  Linuxios Jan 23 '12 at 23:48

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