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In the cte select, I'm concatenating fixed-size id as a sort key:

with recursive cte(
        uno_id,
        uno_tp,
        pnt_uno_id,
        status,
        title,
        content,
        sorter,
        depth ) 
as( select
        uno.uno_id,
        uno.uno_tp,
        uno.pnt_uno_id,
        uno.status,
        uno.title,
        uno.content,
        uno.uno_id::text,
        1
from    uno
where   uno.uno_id = \$1 

union all

select  uno.uno_id,
        uno.uno_tp,
        uno.pnt_uno_id,
        uno.status,
        uno.title,
        uno.content,
        cte.sorter || '-' || uno.uno_id::text,
        cte.depth + 1 AS depth
from    uno 
join    cte ON uno.pnt_uno_id = cte.uno_id
    )
select  *
from    cte
order   by sorter;

and here is a listing showing the uno_id and the sorter column:

1152288185909250, 1152288185909250
1158885255675908, 1152288185909250-1158885255675908
1158885255675906, 1152288185909250-1158885255675906
1158885255675907, 1152288185909250-1158885255675906-1158885255675907

As you can see the second row is out of place - it should actually the the last row.

How can I fix this?


NEVER MIND. Postgres was working correctly. The transport between the server and client did not maintain correct ordering of the array.

Sorry about the unnecessary head scratching and thanks.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There must be some kind of misunderstanding. Something that is not in your question.
Consider the following demo:

WITH cte (uno_id, sorter) AS (
    VALUES
      ('1158885255675908'::text, '1152288185909250-1158885255675908'::text)
     ,('1152288185909250', '1152288185909250')
     ,('1158885255675907', '1152288185909250-1158885255675906-1158885255675907')
     ,('1158885255675906', '1152288185909250-1158885255675906')
    )
SELECT  *
FROM    cte
ORDER   BY sorter;

Result as expected:

      uno_id      |                       sorter
------------------+----------------------------------------------------
 1152288185909250 | 1152288185909250
 1158885255675906 | 1152288185909250-1158885255675906
 1158885255675907 | 1152288185909250-1158885255675906-1158885255675907
 1158885255675908 | 1152288185909250-1158885255675908

This sort order works for any version of PostgreSQL. (The CTE needs v8.4+.)

share|improve this answer
    
yes - that's what I expected. let me research more. –  cc young Jan 24 '12 at 0:58
    
when running your test case get syntax error at or near "x" - am unfamiliar with neat apparently trick of using VALUES in SELECT statement –  cc young Jan 24 '12 at 1:13
    
please ignore last comment - not enough coffee. same results for your testing. more looking needed on my part. –  cc young Jan 24 '12 at 1:19

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