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So I was following Python's Super Considered Harmful, and went to test out his examples.

However, Example 1-3, which is supposed to show the correct way of calling super when handling __init__ methods that expect different arguments, flat-out doesn't work.

This is what I get:

~ $ python example1-3.py 
MRO: ['E', 'C', 'A', 'D', 'B', 'object']
E arg= 10
C arg= 10
A
D arg= 10
B
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "Download/example1-3.py", line 27, in <module>
    E(arg=10)
  File "Download/example1-3.py", line 24, in __init__
    super(E, self).__init__(arg, *args, **kwargs)
  File "Download/example1-3.py", line 14, in __init__
    super(C, self).__init__(arg, *args, **kwargs)
  File "Download/example1-3.py", line 4, in __init__
    super(A, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
  File "Download/example1-3.py", line 19, in __init__
    super(D, self).__init__(arg, *args, **kwargs)
  File "Download/example1-3.py", line 9, in __init__
    super(B, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
TypeError: object.__init__() takes no parameters

It seems that object itself violates one of the best practices mentioned in the document, which is that methods which use super must accept *args and **kwargs.

Now, obviously Mr. Knight expected his examples to work, so is this something that was changed in recent versions of Python? I checked 2.6 and 2.7, and it fails on both.

So what is the correct way to deal with this problem?

share|improve this question
2  
My preferred way is: Flat and simple inheritance hierarchies. –  millimoose Jan 23 '12 at 14:06
8  
You should also read "Python's super() considered super" to get a balanced view :) –  Björn Pollex Jan 23 '12 at 14:06
    
@BjörnPollex: Thanks! Your link provides an answer to the question: You can write a "root class" which inherits from object, and it makes sure to call object's __init__ correctly. –  cha0site Jan 23 '12 at 14:15
1  
Note that __init__ on object silently ignores any parameters on Python 2.5. This changed in Python 2.6. –  Wilfred Hughes Apr 30 '14 at 15:40
    
@Wilfred: Hey, Thanks for answering the actual question! Now I know why the essay is out of date! –  cha0site May 4 '14 at 20:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Sometimes two classes may have some parameter names in common. In that case, you can't pop the key-value pairs off of **kwargs or remove them from *args. Instead, you can define a Base class which unlike object, absorbs/ignores arguments:

class Base(object):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs): pass

class A(Base):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print "A"
        super(A, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

class B(Base):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print "B"
        super(B, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

class C(A):
    def __init__(self, arg, *args, **kwargs):
        print "C","arg=",arg
        super(C, self).__init__(arg, *args, **kwargs)

class D(B):
    def __init__(self, arg, *args, **kwargs):
        print "D", "arg=",arg
        super(D, self).__init__(arg, *args, **kwargs)

class E(C,D):
    def __init__(self, arg, *args, **kwargs):
        print "E", "arg=",arg
        super(E, self).__init__(arg, *args, **kwargs)

print "MRO:", [x.__name__ for x in E.__mro__]
E(10)

yields

MRO: ['E', 'C', 'A', 'D', 'B', 'Base', 'object']
E arg= 10
C arg= 10
A
D arg= 10
B

Note that for this to work, Base must be the penultimate class in the MRO.

share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't Base call super(Base, self).__init__()? –  cha0site Jan 23 '12 at 14:47
    
For this to work, Base must come at the end of the MRO (except for object). Calling object.__init__ does nothing, so it is okay not to call super(Base, self).__init__(). In fact, I think it may be clearer not to include super(Base, self).__init__() to drive home the point that Base is the end of the line. –  unutbu Jan 23 '12 at 14:59

If you're going to have a lot of inheritence (that's the case here) I suggest you to pass all parameters using **kwargs, and then pop them right after you use them (unless you need them in upper classes).

class First(object):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self.first_arg = kwargs.pop('first_arg')
        super(First, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

class Second(First):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self.second_arg = kwargs.pop('second_arg')
        super(Second, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

class Third(Second):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self.third_arg = kwargs.pop('third_arg')
        super(Third, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

This is the simplest way to solve those kind of problems.

third = Third(first_arg=1, second_arg=2, third_arg=3)
share|improve this answer

As explained in Python's super() considered super, one way is to have class eat the arguments it requires, and pass the rest on. Thus, when the call-chain reaches object, all arguments have been eaten, and object.__init__ will be called without arguments (as it expects). So your code should look like this:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print "A"
        super(A, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

class B(object):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print "B"
        super(B, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

class C(A):
    def __init__(self, arg, *args, **kwargs):
        print "C","arg=",arg
        super(C, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

class D(B):
    def __init__(self, arg, *args, **kwargs):
        print "D", "arg=",arg
        super(D, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

class E(C,D):
    def __init__(self, arg, *args, **kwargs):
        print "E", "arg=",arg
        super(E, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

print "MRO:", [x.__name__ for x in E.__mro__]
E(10, 20, 30)
share|improve this answer
    
So, what about E(arg = 10)? I don't like this method, I need to know the MRO in advance in order to use it. The other method where I write a "root class" that inherits from object seems much cleaner. –  cha0site Jan 23 '12 at 14:20
    
This method is useful if the functions called do not share argument-names. I admit that I do not have much practical experience with super, so this approach might indeed be rather theoretical. –  Björn Pollex Jan 23 '12 at 14:25

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