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In this script, I'm fetching a load of data from a MySQL aray, and adding in a little favourite button on each array of returned data, the code for that is

...php while code to fetch array...
...more output...
<a class="favlink" id="'.$row['id'].'">favourite</a>
..more output...

and from that, I've used this bit of jQuery to run a PHP script:

<script>
$(function() {
    $(".favlink").bind("click", function() {
        $.ajax({
            type: "GET",
            data: "v="+$(this).attr("id"),
            url: "fav.php",
            success: function(data) {
            alert('asf');
            }
        });
    });
});
</script>

That works fine, but what I actually want to do, is change the success to something like this:

success: function(data) {
$(this).html("<font color='#ccc'><a href='#'>favourited</a></font>");
}

And, that didn't work!

Is there any way I can change the clicked favourite link to a different font color / and change the text from 'favourite' to 'favourited'?

I assume the 'this' property is no longer 'this' on success for some reason, but I'm not sure?

Thank You!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have to define the context of the ajax. See the docs from Jquery site:

contextObject This object will be made the context of all Ajax-related callbacks. By default, the context is an object that represents the ajax settings used in the call ($.ajaxSettings merged with the settings passed to $.ajax). For example specifying a DOM element as the context will make that the context for the complete callback of a request, like so:

$.ajax({
  url: "test.html",
  context: document.body,
  success: function(){
    $(this).addClass("done");
  }
});

So in your's case I think this is what you need:

  $.ajax({
  url: "test.html",
  context: this,//OR: $(".favlink")[0], // Depends on your scope.
  success: function(){
      $(this).html("<font color='#ccc'><a href='#'>favourited</a></font>");
  }
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer! Really helped! :) –  Karan K Jan 23 '12 at 14:20
2  
+1 for supporting documentation –  Chad Jan 23 '12 at 14:22
1  
@Chad. Thanks documentation for supporting... –  gdoron Jan 23 '12 at 14:24

Add the following line to the $.ajax parameters. By default the context is linked to the $.ajaxSettings of the request. Setting the below line changes the context of this in the ajax request to equal that of the calling method.

context: this,

So your new code will look like this:

<script>
$(function() {
    $(".favlink").bind("click", function() {
        $.ajax({
            type: "GET",
            data: "v="+$(this).attr("id"),
            url: "fav.php",
            context: this,
            success: function(data) {
                $(this).html("<font color='#ccc'><a href='#'>favourited</a></font>");
            }
        });
    });
});
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! :) Didn't realize there was a context parameter! –  Karan K Jan 23 '12 at 14:20
$(function() {
    $('.favlink').click(function() { // this may match more than one element
        var $this = $(this);
        $.ajax({
            'type': 'GET',
            'data': 'v=' + this.id,
            'url': 'fav.php',
            'success': function(data) {
                $this.html('whatever you want');
            }
        });
    });
});

You could also use the context parameter for jQuery.ajax, but I personally think this (hah!) is more readable.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer :) –  Karan K Jan 23 '12 at 14:20

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